Joib interview coming up sq 1 300x169 1 Job Interview Tips 10 Tricky Interviewers To Watch Out For
Job Interview Tips : 10 Tricky Interviewers To Watch Out For

No matter how many job interview tips you review in preparation, there’s no guarantee you won’t get an absolute shock in the form of an interviewer with a totally uncomfortable style about them. Sound negative? No, it’s called being realistic.

Ideally you’ll be greeted by someone who’s relaxed, friendly, professional and approachable. Following their lead will be relatively straightforward and natural. Your nerves will be put at ease early on in the meeting, leaving room for you to ace your answers and prove yourself. Unfortunately, this perfect type of interviewer doesn’t surface every time.

Instead, you might find yourself confronted with a really difficult person. They might not be the hiring manager you expected to see, or your new potential boss, but for whatever reason, getting this unknown person’s tick of approval has become a pre-requisite for winning your dream role.

Interviewer 1: Robotic Rhonda *

RR might as well be a brick wall with a brain. She asks questions in monotone and stares at you blankly while you reply, offering little conversation in return. She does not show any emotion and appears to be running through a list.

Interviewer 2: Timid Tim *

You can barely hear TT when he asks questions. He appears extremely nervous and struggles to maintain eye contact… perhaps this is his first time conducting a job interview? And you thought you were scared!

Interviewer 3: Joker Josh *

JJ has a huge personality and isn’t afraid of trying out his latest comedy routines on you. He makes several inappropriate jokes and you don’t know when he’s being sarcastic and when he’s having you on, waiting for a reaction. You can’t help but feel like you aren’t being taken seriously the whole time.

Interviewer 4: Hyperactive Holly *

HH is like a bull at a gate as soon as you walk in. She’s here, there and everywhere. Her questions are fired out of her mouth at a million miles an hour and she interrupts your questions with her own anecdotes. She nods along intensely as you talk and maintains eye contact the whole time. HH is full on!

Interviewer 5: Pressurer Paul *

PP will stare you down and make you work hard. He will ask you difficult, trick questions that don’t seem to have an obvious point, he will phrase questions in a negative way and make you feel like you’re being investigated, rather than attending the job interview.

Interviewer 6: Overly-friendly Fiona *

OFF really wants to be your best friend. They spend half of your job interview time asking you irrelevant questions about your favourite breed of dog and have a ‘oh my gosh, me too!’ response to everything you say. She doesn’t seem too interested in your skills or expertise, but more what ice cream flavour you enjoy the most.

Interviewer 7: Rushed Rob *

RR makes you feel like he has a million other things he needs to be doing. He makes you feel like his time is unbelievably precious and you’re kind of wasting it by being there. He’ll shoot questions out quickly and nod along preemptively as you speak, in an effort to speed things up.

Interviewer 8: Frowning Fanny *

FF seems really irritated. She seems offended by everything you say and wears a really sour look on her face the whole time. She makes you feel like you’re really annoying her; draining her of all energy. Your attempts at a light-hearted joke to lighten the mood go ignored.

Interviewer 9: Hurricane Henry *

HH is potentially the most unorganized person you’ve ver come across in your life. He has no idea what he’s doing there, what you’re doing there, what the role is and what he should be asking you. He has coffee stains on his shirt and his hair looks like a mad scientist’s.

He’s clearly been asked to step in for someone off sick, and he’d doing a bad job of hiding the fact he has no clue what’s going on.

Interviewer 10: Bored Bill *

BB makes you feel like he’d rather be literally anywhere else in the world. He yawns when you speak and asks questions that come out as half-finished sentences that you have to guess the end of for him.

How to deal… *

It’s important for candidates to be themselves in an interview and let their true personalities shine out, however it is also extremely important to be aware of social cues, as well as the pace and tone being used by the interviewer, and adapt accordingly.

It’s exactly the same as if someone you recognize rushes past you in the street, clearly running late to something, and so waves a quick hello to you before continuing on, barely stopping to make eye contact.

You would not then call out that person’s name, and have them stop and explain to you how they’ve been, how their day’s going, where they’re off to and so forth – it’s all about knowing when to take someone else’s lead. They want to keep moving, so let them.

If you’re confronted with one of the above interviewers, you’re going to have to follow their lead. Always remember not to say what you think they want to hear, but stay true to yourself and answer honestly. Don’t let their intensity or flippant demeanor rock you or stumble you.

Don’t take their attitude personally – they don’t even know you. Just focus on delivering the messages you’ve been preparing for and practicing.

Interview Tips 960x460 sq 1 9 Interview Tips To Help You Impress Your Interviewer
9 Interview Tips To Help You Impress Your Interviewer

Before you apply these interview tips, you must first establish rapport and small talk. Once you master the small talk, here are some interview tips that will help you impress your interviewer.

  • Work on your handshake: *

    Don’t offer up a flimsy or sweaty hand. Instead, when you meet with prospective employers or interviews, offer a firm handshake, with one or two pumps from the elbow to the hand. It’s a good way to illustrate your confidence and start the interview off on the right note.

  • Get serious: *

    If you take a casual approach to the initial interview with a company, especially with a screening interviewer from the human resources department, you may be sealing your fate. Job seekers should treat every interview as if it’s their one and only chance to sell themselves to the recruiter.

  • Get the practice: *

    If you find yourself being offered an interview for a job you are not really interested in, go on the interview anyway; you can make contacts for future job opportunities and get valuable interview practice.

  • Be enthusiastic: *

    Bring a positive attitude to your interview. Most interviewers won’t even give a second thought to someone who has a negative presence or seems like they almost need to be talked into the job. “You’re selling yourself, and part of you is the positive approach you’ll bring to the office every morning, ” says Alison Richardson, a recruiter for several New York financial firms. “That smile and friendly demeanor go a long way.”

  • Ask questions: *

    When interviewing for a new position, it’s essential to have a handful of questions to ask your potential employer. Some questions could include: What do you consider to be the ideal background for the position? What are some of the significant challenges? What’s the most important thing I can do to help within the first 90 days of my employment? Do you have any concerns that I need to clear up in order to be the top candidate?

  • Tell a story: *

    Your interviewer wants to know about your skills and experiences, but he or she also wants to know about you. Don’t fire off routine answers to questions. Instead, work your answers into stories or anecdotes about yourself. People remember the people who are interesting. Prove your value by tailoring stories that address the main concern an interviewer may have: What can you do for us?

  • Show restraint: *

    During an interview, what you don’t say may be as important as what you do say. As a rule, don’t talk about money or benefits, especially during the first interview. You should already know if you fit the parameters. Don’t badmouth about any of your past employers. Organizations don’t hire complainers. Don’t mention outside career aspirations or part-time jobs. Employers are looking for people who want to be part of their organization for the next decade and beyond.

Whatever you do, don’t mention the need for an immediate vacation. First of all, you’re making an assumption that the recruiter wants to hire you. Second, you’re essentially removing yourself from the list of potential candidates. A job candidate we once interviewed was quick to announce that she needed time off immediately for a two-week honeymoon. We hadn’t even offered her the job. Needless to say, we didn’t. Certainly, there are scenarios in which you’ll need to discuss pending scheduling conflicts, but the interview isn’t one of them.

  • Be memorable: *

Considering the number of job seekers interviewing for positions today, it’s fair to suggest that many HR workers can hardly keep track of the differences. That’s why it’s important to do or say something that will allow you to stand out in the mind of your interviewer. This could even be one of the important interview tips you put in mind. It will strike a personal note and also provide a point of reference when it’s time to recall the top candidates. Sure, the job candidate with “American Idol” experience had no real usable background for the job we were looking for, but he was memorable.

  • Among the interview tips, don’t forget to ask for the job: *

    “Tell your interviewer you want the job — period, ” says Dana Fulbright, an IT recruiter for Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. “So many people leave without ever saying they want to be hired. It sounds so simple, but it’s true. Let your employer know that you want to work there.”

So, good luck! Landing a job would be easy if you are just prepared and has followed all these vital interview tips.

Job seekers Copy Jobs In Sydney 8211 Seek Employment Trends
Jobs In Sydney – Seek Employment Trends

SEEK Employment Trends: spotlight on Jobs in Sydney, New South Wales *

The Emerald City was shining brightly in March 2016 with an increase in SEEK job ads across the majority of industries. While the inner suburbs of Sydney continue to be the employment hot spots for industries such as construction, experts are now seeing promising signs of growth in the city’s west.

Sydney’s job market has been increasingly strong over recent months. This trend is reflected across much of New South Wales, which experienced a year-on-year boost in SEEK job ads of 14.9% in March 2016 and a mild tightening of candidate availability.

“It feels like Sydney and NSW have returned to the front of the pack over the past 18 months,” says Mark Smith, director of recruitment firm People2People. “We’re not the poor cousin to WA anymore now that the resources boom is over and you can really feel that in the marketplace. Business confidence is up and that’s because, as a state, we’re back.”

Growth goes west *

Sydney’s CBD has always been its economic focus; however, Smith says the western suburbs are experiencing growth. “It’s like western Sydney is really shaping its own identity. It’s an interesting area to watch,” he says.

“When you look out the window of our Parramatta office, you can see 13 cranes in the sky because the area is really beginning to build up,” adds Smith. “Traffic is also a nightmare in Sydney so people are wanting to work close to where they live, so that may also be having an influence on growth in this area of the city. I think the market in western Sydney is bigger than Brisbane and Adelaide put together. It’s untapped.”

Dylan White, partner with recruitment firm Denovo, says the entire city has a growing influence on the global stage. “It has always been a city of influence and, as the rest of the country has caught up, we are seeing Sydney take an even greater step into the spotlight,” he says. “It’s become the first major city in Oceania to operate in similar ways to New York or London. Traditionally, if you were an American company you would go to Europe and then Singapore or Hong Kong for expansion. Now international companies are seeing a huge talent pool in Sydney.”

White says this may be contributing to the increase in SEEK job ads for sectors such as CEO and general management, which saw a year-on-year boost of 35% in March 2016.

“Companies that are coming across from the US and Europe are starting their presence with just a few people and then they build brand awareness and employ a senior management team,” he explains.

Construction on the horizon *

The Sydney skyline is a good indication of the city’s growth. “There are so many cranes out there,” says Smith. “It almost worries me because there is such a boom in construction and after a boom there is always a bust.”

Sydney’s construction sector experienced a 21% year-on-year increase in SEEK job ads in March 2016. Related industries, such as design and architecture, grew by 14% compared to the same time last year and SEEK job ads for trades and services were up by 24% year-on year. Meanwhile, Sydney’s real estate and property sector saw year-on-year growth in SEEK job ads of 9%.

White notes that the construction boom is creating a backlog of work for these related industries. “I think they will settle down when they catch up with the rate of construction,” he says.

A slip in four sectors *

Looking at March 2016 data, only four industries experienced year-on year declines in job ads in Sydney. Sales roles dipped only 1%; however, Smith says the industry remains steady. “We haven’t felt any change,” he says. “There’s still organic demand for sales roles.”

Job ads for the farming, animals and conservation sector were down by 19% and in the accounting industry they declined by 8%. Meanwhile, the banking and financial services sector saw a decrease of 4%.

Smith says the decline in job ads in banking and financial services may be the result of cost cutting. “Margins are being squeezed and when you need to cut costs, you tend to go offshore,” he says. “This sector offshored a lot of customer service roles some time ago and then did it again with transactional accounting roles. It’s happening now to some extent with analyst roles but, as far as I’m concerned, there’s still a lot of activity in the market here.”

As Sydney continues to assert itself as a global city, White says its job market will continue to shine. “Australia is now a more influential hub for technology and finance and we have a lot of resources that we can provide the global economy. As a result of that, Sydney is naturally the centre point for where we sit as a nation.”

Images 12 sq 300x185 1 5 Ways To Land Your Dream Job With These Top Interview Tips
5 Ways To Land Your Dream Job With These Top Interview Tips

Candidate

5 Ways to Land Your Dream Job with These Top Interview Tips *

26 July 2017 by Guest Author

Handshake 2056021 1920 e1500893586856 5 Ways To Land Your Dream Job With These Top Interview Tips

Hands up! Who loves the sweaty palm inducing process that is the ‘dream job interview’? So far, you have impressed them with your CV and completed a great application form. You may have aced tests and now comes the face-to-face meeting.

Now is your chance to shine and show the interview panel that you have the personality as well as the skills to do the job and fit right into their culture.

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But your mind is blank and your mouth dry. They ask you a question you weren’t expecting and you feel your dream job slipping away before your very eyes. STOP this happening with these five great ways to grab the upper hand at your next job interview.

1. Prepare for the obvious questions *

No two interviews are the same and with every business interviewing candidates differently, it is hard to come with a set formula for your pre-interview research.

However, spending some time preempting some of the possible questions is a great way to spend half an hour or so in the days before the interview. If you were on the panel, what questions would you ask?

These questions might not come up in your interview but they may be worth pondering;

  • How do you stay up to date with issues in our field? What blogs etc. do you follow?
  • What do you think are the key issues OR what problems can you foresee in the future?
  • Where do you see yourself in X years’ time?

It is also worthwhile preparing for the icebreaker question – tell us a bit more about you? – even though you are an expert on you, it is amazing how quickly your mind forgets the very basics of your life!

Top tip – interviewers and interviewing panels are not looking for the perfect answer. What they are looking for is someone who has clearly done their research and can present a reasoned argument or answer under pressure.

2. Bring backup *

This doesn’t mean bringing your mum but bringing materials that back up what you talk about in the interview. Anyone can say that they turned a business around, bringing a 50% rise in membership, for example, but bring the information to back it up – what about a colourful spreadsheet or graph – and the panel can see that again, you are the person who likes to be prepared.

Print a couple of copies, make sure your name is all over them and have a keen eye for the detail and leave them with the panel at the end of your interview.

3. Interviewers are not always experts *

Sifting through CVs and application forms, meeting and greeting candidates and interviewing people is a time-consuming process. It comes on top of all their other responsibilities and thus, the interviewer can often be less prepared than they would like.

See this as an opportunity and a means by which you can steer the conversation. This works well for you both. The interviewer or panel get a great interview with plenty of insight and you show yourself to be uber-capable of taking on the role.

BUT – and this is a big but – don’t go flying in there assuming that the interviewer is ill-prepared and that you are their saviour! Check the situation first because some companies will wheel out their most experienced interviewer to wheedle out those that say they walk the walk, and talk the talk, but don’t really deliver.

4. Ask the right questions *

You now the question is coming, “Do you have any questions?”. It is the part of the interview that most people stress out about and mess up as a result.

There are some fantastic creative questions you could ask but take care that they don’t come across as being too off the wall or rude;

  • What do see as my goals for the first 3/6/9/12 months in the post?
  • How will my success be measured?
  • What skills do you think are needed to excel in this role?
  • What are the biggest challenges the company is facing right now?

Top tip – these are just a few examples and work well but no matter what questions you ask, make sure they are not ‘yes and no’ ones. Interviews are a two-way street!

5. Look at your body language *

Some people have a practice run with a friend and have the ‘interview’ videoed and the results can be surprising. Did you know your play with your rings or wring your hands? Were you aware you constantly touch your nose or your ear when nervous? Do you lean too far forward or slouch in the chair?

Preparing for an interview is about looking at the whole picture and understanding how you come across. It could be that you are too enthusiastic if there is such a thing, or maybe you are not vibrant enough. Giving the right impression at an interview is about creating the right impression from the moment you walk into a room till the moment you leave.

Use these five tips to be better prepared and remember, make a point of slowing down your speech (we garble when we are nervous), concentrate on steadying your breathing, relax and if you can, enjoy it too.

About the author: This article was written by the team at NCC Home Learning, one of the fastest growing online learning providers in the UK. With many years’ experience in helping students to study for the qualifications and skills that propel their careers from ordinary to extraordinary, the NCC team also know the importance of interviewing well too. These tips were gathered from their own in-house team, as well as from students over the years. 

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    How to make resume stand out 5 Simple Ways To Create A Resume That Stands Out
    5 Simple Ways To Create A Resume That Stands Out
    Wondering how to Create a Resume that stands out, gets interviews, beats the competition? *

    Our Employment Advisers have compiled a list of 5 Ways to Create a Resume that will make the Cut!!!

    • Be Visually Appealing *

    Creating a visually appealing resume is a great way to stand out from the rest, most resumes follow a precise structure, using colors, and restructuring the no-nonsense structure of the traditional resume is something to explore during a resume makeover. There are an abundance of ways to get creative with your resumes. Remember that the point is to showcase your creativity, not overwhelm the recruiter. Limit the range of colors that you use, do not allow the visual to distract from content.

    • Incorporate Important Keywords *

    Understanding how to use keywords is not reserved for SEO work alone, keywords are important in the structure and wording of your resume. Identify words that will resonate in the recruiter’s mind by visiting the organization website, and doing as much research as possible through social media platforms like LinkedIn. Reread the job description and research leaders within the organization in order to understand their vision and the terms that will help you to not only get noticed but to do so in a way that your potential employer will value.

    • Make Your Resume Adaptable *

    Making your resume adaptable means ensuring that it is easier to modify for different positions, with different requirements. Sending the same resume is something that should be avoided as much as possible.
    Use formats that allow you to easily go in and to shift the focus from one skill or requirement over the other.

    • Use Social Media to Your Advantage *

    Social Media is a great way to build an amazing personal brand, which can create incredible opportunities for you, especially if you have successfully grown a large network. Using LinkedIn, Facebook or Twitter professionally is just the tip of the iceberg.
    Using a larger platform, like a blog, to provide solutions in your industry is a great way to market yourself as an expert in your industry. In order to build a powerful brand, understand what personal branding is, and learn from those who have mastered the skill.

    • Remain Focused *

    Through your resume, your mission is to convince the recruiter that you are not just a great fit for the position, you are the best option. In order to do this, make the time to understand not only the position but the capacity in which the organization has directed previous employees in the past.

    Recruitment process sq 1 Your Career Type 038 What It Means For Your Success
    Your Career Type & What It Means For Your Success

    We have moved well beyond the traditional organisational career, where individuals are hired in to an organisation that takes full accountability for providing the career pathway to suit the needs, capabilities and preferences of that individual. Traditional career pathways were very entrenched in this model of career development where the success drivers were hierarchical progression; ‘ladder climbing’ being the best expression used to describe this approach.

    However, the global organisation structure has changed and in many markets, this has been reflected in the change to different career development approaches. Specifically, it has introduced the protean career and boundaryless career. Although there are strong similarities between each of these, there is a slight differentiation in their purpose:

    The protean career is a name given to describe a career that is driven by the individual and not by the organization, however the career may remain within the organisational boundaries. The boundaryless career is similar to the protean career however, a boundaryless career focuses on external influences to deliver their objectives and is not limited by organisation, industry, culture or location.

    Each of these define a new level of complexity for organisations in talent management and recruitment practices, but it also presents new challenges in different cultures and labour markets. Importantly however, this different approach to career development has a substantial impact on your ability to achieve success if you do not align your career type to what is available or suitable to you.

    Why should you know what type of career is your preference? *

    The way you approach your career development, or in the more traditional term, the way you desire your organisation to provide you career development, will depend on your type of career preference. For some cultures, career development and employment regulations enforce a more traditional, hierarchical organisational career offering. In this circumstance, individuals that are seeking a more protean or boundaryless career may not achieve this in their current location.

    How will this impact your career success? *

    As organisations change, their talent management strategies change to reflect their growing needs and objectives. This may alter their approach to career development, talent management as well as recruitment and selection for staff. This change may suit some of the existing employees. However, if the organisation strategy seeks to move to hiring individuals looking beyond organisational, cultural and country boundaries, this may limit career success within this organisation if you are seeking to remain in a more traditional organisational career.

    There are a great number of influences that determine why an organisation may seek to employ individuals desiring different career types. Specifically, the way an individual manages their career and seeks to achieve their own career objectives influences the policies, internal culture and work environment within an organisation. Furthermore, organisations that are looking to expand themselves beyond cultural or country boundaries may see that they need to look for individuals seeking boundaryless careers to support this.

    How do you determine what career type you are? *

    Like all great advice, talking to a career coach or career development practitioner is a great place to start to understand your specific preferences. Working with a qualified professional can then support you in delving deeper in to how to align these preferences to organisations, industries, labour markets and work environments.

    However, if you feel that you wish to start with your own research, here are some questions that if you answer ‘yes’ to, can determine what type of career you are:

    Organisational career *

    • Am I keen to have someone else facilitate and define my career opportunities?
    • Do I like the stability of remaining within 1 organisation across my career?
    • Do I have limited flexibility and mobility in where I can work or where I can move my family to?
    • Am I not interested in relocation or frequent travel beyond my existing environment?

    Protean career *

    • Am I interested in defining my own career direction and identifying the required steps to take to get there?
    • Am I keen to work with my current organisation to provide the foundation for this?
    • Do I have limited flexibility and mobility in where I can work or where I can move my family to?
    • Am I not interested in relocation or frequent travel beyond my existing environment?

    Boundaryless career *

    • Do I want full ownership of my own career direction?
    • Am I motivated to achieve my career regardless of the industry sector or organisation?
    • Am I comfortable with change and the need to be mobile and flexible?
    • Am I limited in the location that I am able to move to?
    • Can I undertake frequent travel?
    • Am I excited by the opportunity to experience different cultures and lifestyles?

    Although there is a lot more planning and thought required to understand your own career pathway, these interview questions will allow you to have a greater understanding of what career type best suits you. This will change as your priorities in life change, however, having the knowledge of different career types will ensure that you can analyse what is best for you when the time comes.

    Cover ltr sq Copy 9 Tips To Writing A Graduate Cover Letter
    9 Tips To Writing A Graduate Cover Letter
    How can a graduate cover letter looks like? *

    If you are a fresh graduate, your first priority after finishing your studies is to get a full-time job. When you are looking for work, you spend a lot of time writing and polishing your resume to make it exactly right. The cover letter almost seems like an afterthought.

    It can be tempting to simply send a couple of lines to a prospective employer with the resume:

    “Please find enclosed/attached my resume for the position of [x]. Kindly contact me for an interview”

    This is not going to impress a prospective employer these days! To can be invited for a personal interview by putting a lot more thought and effort into writing your cover letter.

    Each job that you are applying for will need its own letter, and you will need to put some care into crafting your response. Taking the time to write a quality cover letter will lead to more interviews and decrease the time it will take to get a job offer:

    1. Use language that carefully mirrors the wording used in the job ad: *

    A number of employers use computer software to screen candidates for available positions. You’ll need use keyword that match the ones used in the description if you want to be matched to the opportunity. Review the ad carefully and underline the main points before you start writing your cover letter.

    If your cover letter is being reviewed by a hiring manager personally, he or she is likely going to skim over it briefly at first. You’ll increase the likelihood of getting a closer review of your qualifications if you choose language that closely matches most (if not all) the requirements listed in the ad.

    Don’t embellish your qualifications to sell yourself to an employer if you don’t fully meet the requirements the company is looking for. Do present yourself in the best possible manner, though, by covering off as many of them as you can. The employer may give more weight to some qualifications more than others, and you have no way of knowing which ones the company values most.

    2. Use an appropriate format for business letters on your cover letter: *

    Basic block style is easy to read and you won’t get confused about the proper layout. You want the reader to be able to focus on the message without being distracted by a complicated letter writing style. With this set-up, the sender and the recipient’s address are left justified. With the exception of a double space between paragraphs, the entire letter is single spaced.

    3. Stick to a font that is easy to read: *

    Now is not the time to experiment with a highly-artistic font. Even if you are applying for a job in a creative field, keep your correspondence businesslike. Select a basic font that is easy to read in a size that your reader will not have to strain to make out. You also don’t want to select one that is excessively large, since this may come across as being aggressive.

    Times New Roman and Arial are the standard font used for business correspondence. Use a 12 pitch size when composing your letter. It’s large enough to be easy to read without being overwhelming.

    4. Address your cover letter to a specific person, if possible: *

    Try to find out the name of the hiring manager. That way, you can direct your letter to him or her personally. This is a much better choice than sending your letter “To Whom it May Concern.”If you aren’t sure how to spell the person’s name, contact the company directly to confirm the spelling.

    Since some names can be used for both genders, use this opportunity to confirm whether you are directing your letter to Mr. or Ms. [Whoever] at the same time. It’s always a good idea to ask a question, rather than assuming something and being wrong. Your application may put in the rejection pile if you make a mistake like that.

    In a situation where you can’t find a name for the hiring manager or the head of the Human Resources Department, you can address your letter to “Dear Hiring Manager.” It’s still a better choice than starting off with Dear Sir/Madam.

    5. Start your cover letter by stating when and where you found the job opening: *

    The company may be trying to fill multiple position. Be specific about which job you are interested in. The hiring manager is also interested to know where you get the job postings. It helps them in their efforts to target places where quality candidates are looking to find jobs.

    6. Focus on your educational background: *

    Your diploma and degree is your area of strength as you just recently completed this. Lead with it and highlight it in the body of your letter. Tell the employer the full name of the program you have just completed, including the concentration. Don’t expect him or her to refer to your resume for this information.

    Do refer to any awards or honors you received that would make you stand out as exemplary candidate for the position. Someone who has the drive to perform well in school can transfer those skills into the workplace.

    7. Include any training or internships you have completed: *

    If you have completed any internships or on-the-job training that is relevant to the position you are applying for, be sure to mention this in your letter. However, if you think about your prior experience and it’s a stretch for you to see how it relates to the work you would be doing if you were hired for this job, the better choice is to leave it off your cover letter.

    Don’t make the reader work to have to find the connection. You want to present yourself as the clear choice for the position.

    8. List any special skills you have to offer: *

    Are you familiar with any of the specific computer programs listed in the ad? Mention them in your letter. Do you know how to set up web pages or manage a social media campaign? If these are mentioned in the advertisement or are related to the job you are looking for, do include them in your cover letter.

    Be honest about your level of expertise. Present yourself as a confident and competent person. Just don’t oversell yourself either. Do no lie about your abilities. Employers will found out. It’s the quickest way to get yourself taken out of the running for a job. You can always learn more if you have some knowledge about a subject; it’s not necessary to claim to be an expert if you aren’t at that level.

    9. Ask for an interview: *

    The purpose of writing your letter is to present yourself as the best candidate for the job and to get the employer to want to meet with you. Ask for that meeting! It’s a good idea to explain if there are any dates when you will not be available to meet due to finishing coursework or other commitments. Being honest and up front about your schedule from the outset is the best way to deal with the situation if you are not immediately available for interviews.

    10. Proof-read carefully before sending: *

    After you’re finisher with writing, go over the cover letter carefully a couple of times before you send it to a prospective employer. The little things matter when you are trying to make a good first impression. Perfectly spell the company name and address. You should also double-check the spelling of the hiring manager’s name before sending it.

    With these suggestions, you can write an effective cover letter that get you your first job after graduation. Good luck with your cover letter writing!

     

    Best font for resume sq Copy The 5 Best Fonts To Use On Your Resume
    The 5 Best Fonts To Use On Your Resume

    Times New Roman as a font for your Resume might cost you your next job.
    While resume font choice may seem trivial, experts say it’s actually pretty important. A bad font can take the focus off the accomplishments you’ve listed.

    “A reader may not arrive at the content if your font if too distracting, ” Samantha Howie, senior human resources recruiter at the New York-based Maximum Management Corp., told the Huffington Post. “The key is that we can read it with ease.”

    Drawing upon Howie’s recruiting expertise and tips from a typeface expert, we’ve composed a definitive list of the best fonts to use on your resume. Spoiler alert: The days of using Times News Roman have come to an end.

    Modern. Tasteful. Professional. Interesting. “Calibri really does it for me — it’s my personal favorite, ” Howie said. “It’s clear, readable, straightforward but not lacking in personality.” In Microsoft Office 2007, Calibri replaced Times New Roman as the default typeface in Word and replaced Arial as the default typeface in PowerPoint and Excel.

    “It’s a no-fuss typeface that has a timeless feel to it, ” Hoff said. Howie mentioned that Helvetica is popular at the recruiting firm where she works.

    “It has the same positive attributes as Garamond, but for me doesn’t feel as dated because it is less curvy, ” Howie said of this font. However, Hoff said that Georgia tends to appeal more on the Web than it does in print. So if you’re going to distribute hard copies of your resume, think twice about Georgia.

    Howie approves of this widely popular font, calling it a “safe bet.” Typeface expert Brian Hoff, creative designer at Brian Hoff Design, agrees. “It’s very neutral, ” he told Huffinton Post. “It’s clean but doesn’t have much of a way about it.”

    For an elegant feel, Garamond is the one. “Garamond is very readable, ” Howie told Huffington Post. “But for me, it feels a little bit old fashioned, or perhaps not as corporate.”

    Of course, some typefaces are absolute negatives. Comic Sans, for one, should never be considered, according to the experts we interviewed.
    “Comic Sans was literally created for comic books, ” Hoff said.

    “In the professional word, it is totally inappropriate, ” Howie added.
    Times New Roman, a font praised by high school English teachers across the country, is not so warmly received in the professional world, either.

    “It’s telegraphing that you didn’t put any thought into the typeface that you selected, ” Hoff told Bloomberg News earlier this year. “It’s like putting on sweatpants.”

    The consensus: Be interesting but not too playful. Be professional but not basic. Be modern but not extravagant. Moderation is key when it comes to resume fonts.

    Write hot cover letter sq 1 The Cover Letter Format To Use To Get Your Resume Read
    The Cover Letter Format To Use To Get Your Resume Read

    The job of the cover letter is to get you an interview, but what if your resume doesn’t even get read? *

    One way of increasing your chances is attaching a great cover letter, as the job of the cover letter is to entice the reader to learn more about you and read that resume.

    A well-written cover letter will help your resume or CV stand out from the crowd. A hiring manager, recruiter or HR person will be snowed under with applications such as yours and therefore you had better make yours be special.

    The key question/problem the cover letter should answer/solve is “Why select you?” This means you have to clearly state what you do better than others, what makes you unique and how the reader would be making a mistake by not considering you for the position. Here are a few guidelines on putting together a killer cover letter today:

    Details on the Cover Letter: *

    Make sure you put the typical details at the top of the page, get all the details right and check them a few times before sending off:

    • Your Address
    • Date
    • Mr. /Ms. (Name of Employer)
    • Title
    • Company Name
    • Their Address
    • Dear Mr./Ms. (Their Name Again)
    First paragraph: *

    We begin by starting our business, basically telling the reader what job you are applying for and why. Let’s keep this short and to about three sentences, cover these points:

    • Reason for writing and which role you are applying for.
    • Drop any names of people you know in the organization here, e.g. “John Smith in your department encouraged me to send an application as he thinks I have the required skills to succeed.”
    • Give any compelling reasons you have applied for the position or company. Keep it short and sweet, with the view to inspire the reader.
    Second paragraph: *

    Here’s your chance to tell the employer why you are the man/woman for the job. Bring out some of your most relevant skills and experiences and mention how they will be applied in the new position. Pick out three examples of major achievements and provide the story to back these up:

    • Start out with a short introduction focused on your achievements and how your skills and experience will be a good match for the new job.
    • Use the rest of the paragraph to support and back up your introduction. This is where you exhibit your evidence in terms of specific positions/roles/responsibilities and so on.
    • Keep this paragraph punchy and designed to impress, not to bore anyone. Don’t write too much about one accomplishment that you are the most proud of as you don’t know what the reader will think.
    • Wrap things up with the final sentence, repeat the job title and company to further position yourself as the right person for the job in the mind of the reader.
    Last paragraph: *
    • A short paragraph that simply mentions your attached resume, tells the employer you are looking forward to an interview and let them know you will be in contact by a specific date.
    • Don’t forget to thank the person reading your cover letter for their time and consideration.
    Sign-off *

    Sincerely,
    Your Signature (scan this)
    Your Name
    Attachment(s)

    Word of warning *

    A classic mistake is to use the same cover letter for all applications. This is counter-productive and the employer can spot it a mile away. The one-size-fits-all cover letter will result in your resume being deleted before even opened.

    Cover letter resuime sq The 7 Steps To Writing An Interview Winning Cv
    The 7 Steps To Writing An Interview-Winning Cv
    1) Research your target employers: *

    Before you start writing your CV, you should find out exactly what your target employers want to see on applicants’ CVs. Search for relevant jobs online, make a list of the most popular requirements and link them to your own skills and knowledge. Including keywords will also help your application to beat application tracking systems, as unfortunately a lot of CVs don’t actually get seen by a human if they don’t make it through the initial digital screening process.

    2) Format and structure are crucial: *

    A busy CV can be off putting and confusing! You need to ensure that recruiters and employers can navigate your CV easily and pick out the key information that they need. Divide your CV sections clearly with bold headings, use a simple font and break up text for ease of reading. Try to restrict it to a page or two, as the recruiter’s decision to progress your application will be based on the key information, not your life story!

    3) Make a big impression with your profile: *

    The profile that you include at the beginning of your CV is crucial as i is the very first thing an employer will read and it could even be the deciding factor for recruiters when they are rushed for time and scanning through dozens of CVs. Make sure that it is packed with in-demand skills and knowledge, but show some personality too, so you don’t sound like a cliche! Try to keep it short and sharp to draw readers in and encourage them to read your CV in full.

    4) Structure your role descriptions properly: *

    Job titles don’t always reveal much about what your previous roles entailed. In order to demonstrate the value that you can bring to a new potential employer, you must use your role descriptions to showcase what you’ve achieved for past employers. Start with an overall summary, then describe your responsibilities in bullet points and try to add some key achievements to prove your input.

    5) Adapt your education: *

    The amount of information that you need to give about your education really depends on the stage in your career you are at. List your education at the bottom of your CV and adapt the amount of detail depending on your experience level. Less experienced candidates should include lots of education information, whereas more experienced candidates can use a short summary.

    6) Keep interests relevant: *

    Interests are an optional section so only include interest that can add value to your job applications in terms of showing a bit of personality or demonstrating your true interest in the industry. Culture fit is a big factor that is considered when making a new hire, so some recruiters and employers may take a look at your interests to gage what kind of person you are and how they feel you would fit in at their organisation.

    7) Triple check your CV: *

    Mistakes in your CV can seriously damage your job hunting chances, so make sure you thoroughly proof read your CV before sending it out to employers. Spelling and grammar errors can look sloppy, so it’s best to get a second opinion from a family member or friend ahead of sending it off.

    .

    Resume Tips sign 6 Tips For Writing An Effective Resume
    6 Tips For Writing An Effective Resume
    6 Tips for Writing an Effective Resume *

    Hiring managers and recruiters alike say they’ve seen more poorly written resumes cross their desks more often than ever before. Attract more interview offers and ensure your resume doesn’t eliminate you from consideration by following these six key tips to writing an Effective Resume:

    1. Replace your Objective” with a “Career Summary” *

    A Career Summary is designed to give a brief overview of who you are and what you do. Most Objectives sound similar: Seeking a challenging, interesting position in X where I can use my skills of X, Y, and Z to contribute to the bottom line. Not telling at all.

    • Spend time developing a summary that immediately gets their attention, and accurately and powerfully describes you as a solution to their problems
    • Grab a hiring manager’s attention right from the beginning, remembering you have only 25 few seconds to make a good impression
    • Spend time developing a summary that immediately gets their attention, and accurately and powerfully describes you as a solution to their problems
    2. Cater Your Resume for the Industry *

    Unlike advertising and design professionals who have greater creative license in designing their resume for those fields, the mechanical engineering industry won’t be impressed and may be turned off by distinctive resume design.

    • Err on the side of being conservative stylistically
    • Your accomplishments, error-free writing, grammatically-correct, clean, crisp type and paper will make the impression for you
    3. Quantify Your Accomplishments *

    Q: What’s the most common resume mistake?

    A: Making too many general claims and using too much industry jargon that does not market the candidate. A resume is a marketing document designed to sell your skills and strengths rather than just portray a bio of the candidate.

    • Include and highlight specific achievements that present a comprehensive picture of your marketability
    • Quantify your achievements to ensure greater confidence in the hiring manager and thereby generate interest percentages, dollars, number of employees, etc.
    • Work backward to quantify your accomplishments by asking, If I had not done X, what could have happened?
    4. Identify Accomplishments not Just Job Descriptions *

    Hiring managers, especially in technical fields like engineering, seek candidates that can help them solve a problem or satisfy a need within their company. Consequently, you can’t be a solution to their problems without stating how you solved similar problems in other companies and situations.

    • Focus on what you did in the job, NOT what your job was there’s a difference
    • Include a one or two top line job description first, then list your accomplishments
    • For each point ask yourself, What was the benefit of having done what I did?
    • Accomplishments should be unique to you, not just a list of what someone else did
    • Avoid using the generic descriptions of the jobs you originally applied for or held
    5. Format Your Resume Wisely “Do the Hiring Managers” Work for Them *

    No matter how well written, your resume won’t get a thorough reading the first time through. Generally a resume gets scanned for 25 seconds. Scanning is more difficult if it is hard to read, poorly organized or exceeds two pages.

    • Use a logical format and wide margins, clean type and clear headings
    • Selectively apply bold and italic typeface that help guide the reader’s eye
    • Use bullets to call attention to important points (i.e. accomplishments)
    6. Network. Network. Network. *

    For unemployed candidates, handing out resumes should be a full-time job. The majority of mid- to senior-level positions are filled through networking, so contact absolutely everyone you know in addition to recruiters who are in a position to hire you or share insights. Networking can include

    • Personal business contacts, people you’ve worked for or who worked for you
    • Vendors and sales representatives you’ve dealt with in the past five years
    • People listed in the alumni directory of your alma mater

    With a solid resume in hand you’ll greatly increase your odds of earning a closer look and getting that interview.

    Craving for more effective resume techniques? Let Complete Staff Solutions partner with you to review and update your Resume and Application Letters to cut through the rest, just

    Sell yourself in job interview Interview Tip How To Sell Yourself At A Job Interview
    Interview Tip: How To Sell Yourself At A Job Interview

    If you are looking to get back in the workforce or feel now is the time to switch jobs, it is important to polish up your interviewing skills to put yourself in the best position possible to attain what job you want.

    When going on your interview, your appearance and means of communication with your interviewer are just as important if not more so as to what resides on your resume.

    It is important for those interviewing for a position to focus in on their non-verbal means of communication so they don’t slip up. Remember, your non-verbal communications can kill or deliver the results you want.

    Be Prepared and Focused: *

    When you first meet and greet your interviewer, do you make good eye contact and deliver a firm handshake? If not, you could lose points right off the bat, leaving you to have to play catch up over the course of the interview.

    Some other missteps that can doom an interview include not smiling, appearing unusually nervous, demonstrating bad posture, bad wardrobe or grooming and being animated when asked simple questions. Oh, this seems like a no-brainer, but don’t be late for your interview; you’d be amazed what message a little tardiness (non-emergency) can mean to an employer before you even sit down for a one-on-one chat.

    A good way to avoid many if not these mistakes is by doing a practice interview the night before in front of family, friends and/or a mirror. While you don’t want to come across as too rehearsed, a little practice never hurt anyone. This also holds true with getting to your interview on time. It never hurts to do a practice run so you know the exact location of the interview and about how long it will take to get there.

    Mind Your Body Language: *

    When it comes to starting the meeting, be sure to maintain good eye contact with the person interviewing you. By being focused on your interviewer, you’re engaged in the discussion and interested in what the company may be able to offer you; staring past the interviewer is surely not sending a good signal.

    While not talking over or continuously interrupting your interviewer, it is to be expected that you will have some questions regarding the company, so prepare them ahead of time. This allows you to come ready to learn about the position you’re applying for, how your role will impact the employer and what the company can do for you.

    Don’t Put Salary at the Forefront: *

    One question that should not be at the forefront of your list is how much money the job will pay, as nothing looks worse than if you’re only interested in the salary. While it is only natural to want to know what your income will be with your new employer, don’t be overly aggressive in getting to that issue.

    Finally, the reason you’re on an interview in the first place is that you either lost your last job or are looking to switch jobs. With either being the case, do not talk bad about your former or present employer.

    Don’t Burn any Bridges: *

    The last thing an individual should do is burn bridges with a former or present boss. Doing so can have a negative impact going forward on your career, not to mention come across to a potential employer as negative and one reason not to hire you.

    When you go on a job interview – the bottom line is simple – Sell, sell and sell yourself.

    Global Job Search – Indeed Au

    A new job is a priority for many jobseekers at the start of the year. In fact, our research shows over half of Australian workers consider a career change during this period. And this phenomena isn’t isolated to Australia. We also see a jump in job interest among other countries where Indeed has sites. This surge in jobseeker activity means that it’s a great time for all employers to post a job. And even as searches grew in January, it’s important to remember that any time of year is good for finding the perfect candidate.

    But what professions are people actually searching for? Let’s take a quick tour around Indeed’s global job search data to find out what’s trending and where. Below are some of the fastest growing searches we saw at the end of 2016:

    Australia

    Australia saw tremendous growth in searches for nurses and teachers, two professions facing serious shortages. The 627.4% growth in searches for nursing jobs is one of the largest trends we identified. Nurses are one of the top jobs listed on the Australian National Skill shortage list. It’s a promising sign to see jobseeker interest growing so rapidly in this understaffed field.

    We identified another surge in searches for data scientist. A job where we see interest on the rise, not only in AU, but in many countries. There is also new interest in transportation jobs, which may not be a surprise when you consider that in Western Australia train drivers can make over $100,000 AUD, making them among highest paid in the world.

    Belgium

    The largest spike among jobseekers (110%) in Belgium is for dietitian jobs. This is not a surprising trend coming from a country known for their chocolate, waffle, fries and beer. Many western countries experience a diet and fitness fads around the start of the new year, but Belgium is experiencing the most drastic growth in job interest for this field globally. This could be a labour market reaction to the the 172,000 tons of chocolate produced annually in Belgium.

    Belgium is also seeing similar growth in nursing, education and tech roles. However, growth in searches for “occupational therapist” is particularly strong in Belgium. This growth makes sense considering the makeup of the Belgian workforce. Over half the Belgian population works in the service industry, a sector prone to cause physical stress or exertion. Another hypothesis for this trend is driven by the aging population. Occupational therapists can help older people recover from various illnesses through activities designed to stimulate their physical cognitive processes.

    France

    France is showing strong growth in some caring professions: special education teachers and nurses in particular. However, we don’t see quite the same massive increases we are observing in some countries. Still the 174.9% jump in searches for “special education teacher” is a big trend in France. The French education system provides free education to children from preschool to high school and some college equivalent training. Recruiters from private medical clinics or individual schools should take note of this growing interest should they need to hire special education teachers.

    Financial controllers are ……………………………

    Germany

    Germany saw massive growth in English translator jobs. This surge (899.9%) is the largest global trend we’ve identified in jobseeker behaviour during the period of this analysis. Europe is experiencing unprecedented streams of refugees streaming in from Syria, North Africa and Middle East. Syria alone has sent over 300,000 refugees into Germany.  Since migrants are more likely to speak English than German as a second language, this spike in interest may represent an effort to overcome the shortage of Arabic-German translators.

    There was also a triple-digit increase in interest for engineering jobsanical and software engineering jobs…………………………….

    Ireland

    In Ireland the number of people searching for “model” saw 242.5% growth in the last quarter of 2016. Our analysis didn’t uncover anything like this spike in interest anywhere else—it’s unique to the Emerald Isle. Most of the people who search for ‘model’ click on fashion model jobs at media and marketing companies, as well as staffing agencies and talent vendors.

    There was also strong interest in process engineer jobs, which may be (slightly) less glamorous but are needed across many industries due to the widely applicable skill set. Process engineers can be found in multiple sectors ranging from agricultural to pharmaceutical to software engineering. There was also close to a 100% spike in the number of people searching for work as Spanish teachers, more than any other language or type of educator.

    United Kingdom

    Meanwhile in the U.K., one job with strong growth was related to helping other people get jobs — ”job coach.” The surge of interest in “smart metering” is also interesting. As more and more ordinary devices are connected to the internet, traditional jobs evolve to account for this technological change, and the interest from jobseekers shows that many are increasingly aware of the demand for new skills. The dark side of technology has also had an impact, as we saw more than 100% growth in searches for cybersecurity jobs, suggesting that jobseekers with the right skills are paying close attention to the headlines and know how much these skills are in demand.

    United States

    Over the past few years, we’ve observed the explosion of jobs requiring technical skills and the struggle by employer to fill those roles. Fortunately, jobseekers are showing growing interest in many tech roles. Ruby developer experienced a staggering 656.1% jump in searches by jobseekers. As is the 557.2% spike in searches for “UX designer.” These two jobs are among the fastest growing searches on Indeed.

    The 191.0% growth in search for “devops engineer” is promising for the tech industry. According to our research, that is the tech role with the 2nd worst supply vs.demand mismatch and ranked 3rd for employer demand. However, we also see some strong growth in jobs that require less technical skills. For instance, welder fabricator requires only a high school diploma and training, but pays well above minimum wage.

    It’s a great time to post a job

    These are some of the jobs that we saw trending as we entered 2017, and it will be interesting to see which professions are on the rise as the year gets underway. This surge in jobseeker activity means that it’s a good time for all employers to post a job. And even as searches grew in January, it’s important to remember that any time of year is good for finding the perfect candidate.

     

     

     

    Article Source 

    Global Spotlight: What Jobs Are Trending Across the World?

     

    Top recruiter 10 Unconventional Yet Effective Tips For Job Seekers
    10 Unconventional Yet Effective Tips For Job Seekers

    In the market for a new job? You’ve probably been given standard tips for job seekers like “pursue your passions, ” “leverage your network, ” “tailor and tidy up your resume, ” “do your homework, ” and “dress for success”—among other things.

    Here are 10 unconventional (but very effective) tips for job seekers: *
    1. Don’t apply for a job as soon as you find it. The worst part about job hunting is the dreaded scrolling of an online job board, applying for job after job, and never hearing back, Adney says. “When you find a job online that you’re really interested in, applying is the last thing you should do. Instead, research that company and the professionals who work there, and reach out to someone at the company before you apply for the job, letting them know you admire what they do and would love their advice.” Then, ask questions via e-mail or phone about what they like and find challenging at their job, and ask if they have any tips for you. “Most likely they will personally tell you about the job opening (you should not mention it) and then you can ask them about getting your application and resume into the right hands, ” she says. “It is a great way to keep your applications from getting lost in the black hole of the Internet.”
    2. Don’t focus on finding a job you love now. Don’t obsess about how much you’ll enjoy a particular job on day one, Newport says. Most entry-level positions are not glamorous. “The right question to ask when assessing an opportunity is what the job would look like in five years, assuming that you spent those years focusing like a laser on developing valuable skills. That’s the job you’re interviewing for.”
    3. Create your position. Don’t just sit around waiting for your “dream job” to open. Study the industry or field that you’re looking to move into, and determine a company or two that you’d like to work for, Hockett says. “Then figure out their challenges through relationships or public information. With this, you can craft a solution for them that you can share directly or publically through a blog, for instance. The concept here is to get noticed through offering a solution to help them with no expectation of anything in return.”
    4. Be vulnerable. It’s okay to ask people for advice! “Too often we think we have to sell ourselves as this know-it-all hot-shot to get a job, but I have found the best way to build relationships with people whom you’d like to work with (or for) is to start by being vulnerable, sharing your admiration for their work, and asking for advice, ” Adney says. “I recommend doing this with professionals at companies you’d love to work for, long before they have a job opening you apply for.”
    5. Don’t always follow your passion. “Follow your passion” is one of the most common pieces of career wisdom, says Cal Newport, author of So Good They Can’t Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love. “It’s also wrong.” If you study people who end up loving their work, most of them did not follow a pre-existing passion, he says. “Instead, their passion for the work developed over time as they got better at what they did and took more control over their career.”
    6. Start at the top and move down. We learned from Chris Gardner (played by Will Smith) in The Pursuit of Happyness (the biographical film based on Gardner’s life) that you need to start from the top and move down. “Why approach human resources in hopes that your resume makes it to the hiring authority?” Parnell says. “Just get it there yourself. Be careful to use tact, respect, and clarity during the process, but nevertheless, go straight to the decision-maker.”
    7. Learn how to listen. Job seekers are so caught up in conveying a certain message and image to the employer that they often fail to listen.  When you practicing for interviews, don’t just rehearse your answers to questions like, “can you tell me about yourself?” “why do you want this job?” and “what are your greatest strengths and weaknesses?” Practice listening carefully and closely without interrupting.
    8. Focus on body language. You’ve probably heard this before—but job candidates don’t take it seriously enough. “”Body language is incredibly important in job interviews, ” “Watching yours (posture, your hands, whether or not you’re relaxed, confidence) will help you exude confidence, ” “Meanwhile paying attention to the interviewer’s body language can let you gauge whether or not you’re on the right track.””
    9. Build a relationship with the administrative assistant. While you want to start at the top (see No. 5), you’ll eventually want to build strategic relationships with personnel at all levels.
    10. Become their greatest fan. Once you find a company you’d love to work for, become their biggest fan. ““Becoming a brand loyalist may lead to becoming an employee, ” Organizations ideally want employees to love their company and be enthusiastic about their job. Loyal fans are passionate as consumers, and often make great employees because of this.

    Seeking more job search advice? Please visit our website today.

     

    Why this job Interview Tips How To Answer 8216 Why Do You Want This Job 8217
    Interview Tips: How To Answer ‘Why Do You Want This Job?’

    “So why do you want this job?” Answering that question in an interview should be easy! Often the answers are:

    • Well, I want a job…
    • I want to work…
    • I want to pay the mortgage/rent….
    • I want a promotion, it’s a bigger job…
    • I hate the job I’m in, I need to do something different…
    • My family are moving so I need to change jobs…
    • I’m a bit bored…
    • I like the sound of it…

    I could go on.

    The difficulty with all those answers is that they may well be true and they may well explain why you have applied for a new job but they do not tell the interviewer any good reason why you should have the job. When you are going for an interview or applying for a job you need to give the interview compelling reasons for giving you the job and that starts with the basic question: Why do you want it?

    So how do you give them that compelling reason? By treating this question as an opportunity for your sales pitch. By thinking about what it is that the interviewer wants in a candidate and what it is that they need to hear.

    Ever been turned down for a job because you did not sound very enthusiastic? Been told that they were not sure if you really wanted it? It is a pathetic bit of feedback to give someone. Surely the correct logic is that they offer and if you don’t want it, you turn it down. If you are the best person for the job they should offer, but, it happens, so you need to make sure that it does not apply to you. This is your chance to sound enthusiastic, if not actually passionate, but how do you do that without sounding gushing and false?

    Here are 4 key steps to selling yourself into that job:

    When you are asked about why you have applied for this role, why you want it, etc. Start with:

    Step 1:

    ‘This is a great company /organization because…….’  Everyone likes to be flattered, so tell them why you think they are a good company, what it is you like about the company….

    Step 2:

    Describe the challenges of the role, even if it is a job that is routine. What are the issues they face in getting someone to do the role well?

    Step 3:

    Tell them the things that float your boat, the things you have just been doing, the challenges you really enjoy and give some brief examples.

    Step 4:

    Think about why they might not want to hire you and refute their logic.

    So, if I was going for a job in my local Co-op shop I might say:

    I think the Co-op is a great organization, I admire their ethical stance and I was very impressed when they had no issues over horse meat. That’s the sort of company I’d like to be in. I know you need staff who can work shifts, who are good with customers and who will make sure that the shelves are kept stocked and tidy. I really enjoy working with customers, helping them find things, explaining the difference between products and I hate untidy shops. It’s important to me to be polite and friendly, when I worked in the garage I tried to get every customer to smile before they left! It has been a while since I have done shop work but I don’t think you lose the passion to please the customer and make sure they always come back – I haven’t.

    Remember this is your sales pitch and this is where you can bring together your knowledge of them and your enthusiasm. It is all about why they are great to work for not why you need the job.

     

    Jobs in sydney market sq 1 The Sydney Suburbs With The Best Access To Jobs Shops And Services
    Interview prep sq 1 300x200 1 1 Brush Up On Your Interview Skills
    Brush Up On Your Interview Skills

    At Complete Staff you do not need to prepare for a job interview, you simply Register for Work and we match you to a suitable job, or you find a job on our website and apply:

    But we are a labour hire agency – usually in your job search journey you will need to prepare for, and sit, a job interview.

    It’s a competitive world out there, so it is important that job candidates put their best foot forward in any job interview situation.

    Brush up on your skills and have the all-important etiquette down to a tee before you meet potential employers face to face. Be ready to make a good first impression, because after all, first impressions count!

    Dressing for the interview *

    It’s often hard to know how to dress for an interview, particularly when many organisations don’t require staff to wear a uniform. The key is to dress to impress but make sure it’s suitable for the role. You may notice employees in an office environment wearing a range of clothing, from casual to smarter office attire; base your decision on what the most professional looking people are wearing. It is always best to dress up, rather than down.

    Your arrival *

    Being late will ruin any chances you have of securing a job so make sure you arrive early. This shows your employer that you have good time management skills, but also gives you time to acquaint yourself with the location of the interview and freshen up should you need to.

    Eye contact *

    Greet your interviewer by making eye contact, smiling and extending your arm with a firm handshake. Wait to be offered a seat and remember not to slouch. Body language is almost as important as what you actually say, so keep your attention fixed on the interviewer throughout. By paying attention and listening, you’ll be better able to respond.

    Ask questions *

    Remember that an interview is a two-way conversation. Whilst the hiring manager will ask you a series of questions to ascertain your experience, you need to make sure for yourself that the job is what you expect it to be. Come prepared with a few questions, leaving salary and benefits off the table for the moment.

    Concluding *

    Throughout your interview, be positive about your previous employment experiences, and don’t feel the need to embellish your achievements because your lies will ultimately come undone. At the conclusion of the interview, thank the interviewer for their time and address them by their name. Shake hands and confidently leave the room.

    Don’t fall into the trap of dressing inappropriately, seeming disinterested in the role or referring to a previous employer in a negative manner. Remember too that your mobile phone needs to be off! Do your research and mind your manners and you’ll be off to a great start when it comes to job interview skills.

    DID YOU KNOW WE OFFER COMPLETE JOBSEEKER TRAINING? *

    Including any of the following

    • Resume Preparation
    • Linked in Profile Creation and Maintenance
    • Application Letter for your Job
    • Interview Preparation and Mock Rehearsals
     
    Top 10 sq 1 Top 10 Job Interview Tips And Tricks
    Top 10 Job Interview Tips And Tricks

    Do you know how to sell yourself in an interview? Have you found yourself freezing up? Have you ever had a question where you have not been able to work out what the interviewer was asking – or you could give an answer, but didn’t know if it was the right one? Here are top 10 interview tips for this month. As someone said on Twitter, these are not rocket science, but timely reminders of the basics:

    1) Research the organization: *

    Everyone gets nervous in an interview. It’s a big occasion and you should be nervous. However, if you start with some thorough research, you start to build a case in your own mind of why you should be sitting in that interview room or in front of a panel. Having some confidence is a solid first step to overcoming nerves.

    You can tell a lot about an employer from the employment pages of their website. Things such as the values they have, how easy it is to find out about potential jobs and their responses to you when you apply, can all tell you about the way they handle their recruitment.

    This in turn may reflect what it’s like to work there. If it’s friendly and easy to apply for a job, then chances are they have given some thought to why you would want to work for them.

    The web is a such wealth of facts, but what you need to do, is turn this into information. You can look at annual reports, media releases and product and service information. Online directories have company information and Google indexes the latest media news and references from other sources.

    If a career page has an email contact for an employee, and invites contact, then do it. Often companies will use testimonials that way to attract new people. Use sites such as LinkedIn to research companies.

    When you look for this information, you are not just looking for a set of unrelated facts. You should be looking for reasons that you want to work for that employer.

    You’ll really impress the interviewer if you find some simple yet compelling reasons as to why you want to work for the employer and what appeals to you about the role.

    2) Research the role: *

    One thing that constantly surprises me is that how few people really have any understanding of the role that they are applying for. Job advertisements are partly to blame for this. They are often misleading.

    The person writing the advert is often not the person that you’ll be reporting to. Things always sound different on paper compared to what you will be doing in the role.

    One of my clients recently applied for a job in the public sector. The position description said:

    Building effective communication strategies with a variety of stakeholders and colleagues to ensure information exchanges are timely, accurate and useful.

    This is what this statement meant:

    Providing advice to staff and students on the status of their research applications.

    If you see something like the above, try to talk to someone who knows about the role. A good question to ask is “what does a typical day or week look like?” Once you know what’s expected of you, preparing for the interview is instantly easier.

    Also important is a real insight into the role and the recruitment process. Dig deeper than the advertisement. Put a call through if a contact number is provided. You can find out which of the skills that the employer requires are the priority.

    You can determine what you can do without and importantly you can start to make yourself known (in a good way) to your future employer. Even if the advertisement doesn’t invite it, you can still contact the recruiter. If there are no contact details, be scrupulously polite, it usually means the employers are expecting a deluge of applications.

    Ask them questions about the recruitment process, what the steps are, how long each step takes, and whether they’ve had many applicants. You’d be surprised at the information you’ll receive if you sound polite and interested.

    3) Research yourself: *

    Employers want you to be self-aware. Have a long hard look at what you have achieved, the way you have achieved that result and the skills you developed or demonstrated along the way.

    This type of reflection helps you understand your strengths. It gives you confidence and helps you overcome nerves.

    4) Interviewer insight: *

    No two interview processes are the same. Depending on the organization and the role, you could be interviewed by a recruitment consultant, the HR department, the line manager, all three individually, or any combination.

    Each will have a different agenda for the interview. This is important to remember as your approach with each should be slightly different.

    The recruitment consultant is always the first screener. Their role is to match you to the employer’s requirements and sell you as an applicant. The consultant establishes their credibility with each good candidate they put forward to the employer.

    Take time to woo them, even if you think they don’t know their stuff (as is a common criticism). Their role is essentially a sales one: to sell you the job and, if they believe you are right for the role, to sell you to their client. Make the consultant’s role easier by focusing on your strengths and achievements and point out why you are a good match.

    The HR consultant is usually the recruitment procedural expert. One of their jobs is to ensure the organization meets its legal requirements. They often set up the recruitment process and have a strong attachment to ensuring it is working. It’s a safe bet that you will face a more structured interview from them, than you will from a line manager.

    They are often the employer’s first screener and may need to sell you further, depending on their position and influence within the organization.

    The line manager will be the person who is most concerned about finding someone for the role. They may be a person down or not meeting their organization’s objectives by being understaffed. In the interview, it will be the line manager who has the greatest sense of urgency about filling the role.

    Focus on your workplace achievements when fielding their questions. Work hard to build rapport with them. They will be assessing your fit for their team.

    It may sound obvious but treat each interviewer as if they don’t talk to each other and know anything about you. You’d be amazed at how little communication sometimes goes on between each party.

    5) Practice: *

    Most organizations now use behavioral questions – which means they will be expecting you to provide specific examples of where you have demonstrated the skill they are seeking.

    I strongly suggest practicing for an interview and seeking professional help. A professional is skilled at drawing examples out of you and finessing the ones you already have. However never memorize your lines as you can never predict all the recruiters will ask.

    Memorizing answers will make you stressed in the interview if you can’t recall what you want to say. Worse, you may even not be answering the questions the interviewer asks.

    6) Build rapport: *

    Be friendly. People like that!

    One of the best ways to relax is to assume the interviewer is on your side. Good interviewers are not interested in tripping you up. In fact, most of them are on your side, or are at the very least they will be approaching the interview in a professional manner. It may even help to you to relax if you think of the interviewer as someone who wants you to do your best

    7) Give yourself time: *

    Leave plenty of time to get to the interview. Rushing breeds panic. No matter what excuse you have, tardiness is noted. It creates a negative impression and it puts you behind immediately. Allowing waiting time for an interview gives you time to compose yourself, gather your thoughts and be mentally prepared.

    8) Please be yourself: *

    Be yourself. You will be doing yourself no favors if you try and suppress your personality, or pretend to be something that you aren’t.

    9) Relax: *

    While you think this may be the perfect job for you, it may be not. There are other jobs out there. If you keep this in mind then you’ll remove some pressure from yourself that this is your only chance to perform.

    If you think the interview is going badly, relax and use it as practice for the next one. You never know, you could even recover if you take this approach.

    10) An insider’s tip: *

    The interview is just the formal means of assessing your suitability as a candidate. However, you are not just assessed there. Each interaction you have with your future employer feeds into the bigger picture of their impression of you.

    Use this knowledge. Be polite and friendly with whomever you meet in the process from the very first phone call to the last goodbye to the receptionist on your way out.

    Interviews can be daunting. Here’s another blatant plug. When it comes to interviewing skills, practice with a professional does make perfect. These are just a few interview tips that can help you land the job you want.

    Online research Interview Tips The Online Research Candidates Must Do Before An Interview
    Interview Tips: The Online Research Candidates Must Do Before An Interview

    Here are a few interview tips that candidates must do before an interview. There’s nothing worse than the feeling of walking into an interview room and being thrown questions to answer without fully understanding the company and whether it’s the right organization for you. While it’s great to ask questions during your interview,

    it’s best to get an unbiased view (after all the interviewee will want to sell the company to you). Once you get to the interview stage, things can move along quickly and once you leave the interview it’s not unusual for offers to be made within 24 hours.

    If things do go well you want to make sure that you have a realistic expectation of what it would be like to work at the organization before accepting a new role with them, which means doing your homework before going in for interview.

    With all the information readily available at your fingertips through the medium of the internet, cover your own back by checking out these crucial bits of information before setting foot in the interview room:

    Inside scoop *

    I’d always recommend checking out Glassdoor before any interview! Due to the fact that it’s anonymous you tend to get honest feedback from current / previous employees on what it’s like to work for the organization day to day.

    Take some extreme reviews with a pinch of salt but it’s always good to get an insight from people who have actually experienced working there! If they have a very low Glassdoor rating make sure you question them in the interview around their welfare departmental hierarchy and about various policies and procedures (things like expected hours and duties, over time, escalation, SLA stuff, benefits, training, etc.).

    The company will like it because you’re showing interest in the company… but it will also help you detect the kind of expectations that come from internal managers.

    Financial state  *

    Every company goes through ups and downs when it comes to financials, while start-ups are notoriously associated with high risk (make sure you consider this when contemplating salary requirements etc).

    Larger companies are also susceptible to financial instability which could affect your job, make sure that you’ve done your due diligence online. A good (free site) to start with would be Duedil. If you’re interviewing with a startup make sure you ask about funding (are they going through any other rounds/are they self-sufficient, etc.).

    Be mindful if a start-up is over zealous when it comes to ramping up headcount, if they run out of funding, this is when they may have to cut back down.

    Competitors *

    Understand the industry and what’s out there in the market place, not only will it help you to understand the product / services on offer but it’s also a great talking point in an interview. Maybe you’ve seen another company is creating a similar product (what’s this company’s USP and what’s their plan to overtake them in the marketplace?)

    Culture *

    During an interview often the interviewee will want to paint the company in a positive light and you might find yourself asking what it would actually be like working for the organization.

    Make sure you have a realistic understanding of what the company culture is like by checking out their social media. A lot of organizations have a tag (a life at) and current employees will post content of what they’ve been getting up to at work.

    Media Coverage *

    A quick Google search can be priceless, recent newsworthy stories can help you discover the companies’ successes but also offers an insight into their challenges. In particular.

    Keep an eye out for structural change within the company (maybe a CEO has recently been dismissed) which could lead you to questioning what this could mean about the company’s structure (if you’re feeling brave it could be a good talking point during an interview).

    Opportunity *

    Personally, I wouldn’t want to take a role without the offer of opportunity in the future (nobody likes the idea of a stagnant role) so make sure you check out what’s going on in the company (what other roles are they currently hiring for / how many open vacancies do they have?) Couple this with some killer questions about their expansion plans and project roadmap during the interview to get the overall picture.

    Your future boss *

    A no brainer – make sure you check out any interviewers and your future boss on LinkedIn (you might have more in common than you thought). It’s also worth checking out their individual profiles on the organization’s website.

    Ace interview Interview Tips How To Ace Your Interview And Land The Job
    Interview Tips: How To Ace Your Interview And Land The Job

    The interview is your opportunity to make an unforgettable impression on the company you want to work for and get the job you want. Here are some hints and pointers that will help you make that positive impression:

    Preparation: *

    Always be fully prepared – often it is the one thing that an otherwise very competent candidate is lacking. DO YOUR HOMEWORK! Some of you are wondering what does that mean? Some tips for that include:

    1. Drive to the location before the interview so that you know how to get there, where the parking is, etc.
    2. Know the full name and title of the individual you are to meet with.
    3. Learn as much as you can about the company.
    4. Find out as much as you can about the interviewer and what they look for in a good candidate.
    5. Know what your goals and objectives are for the future so that you can measure these against what is being offered.
    6. Prepare questions that are specific to that position and that company.
    7. Always be professionally dressed. Even in business casual environments, a business suit is required for the interview process.
    8. Arrive on time.
    9. Bring hard copies of your resume. Often the interviewer will have printed it for themselves but it is always good practice to have it on hand just in case.
    • Bring a pen and a note pad in case you want to or need to make any notes.
    The Interview: *
    1. Remember this is your opportunity to shine. When greeting the interviewer make eye contact, extend a firm handshake and address your interviewer by last name.
    2. The interview is your chance to bring forth your strengths and to point out areas of your expertise that are applicable to this position. If you think you might forget some of these at the time, because of nerves, then be sure to list them on your note pad and, with your interviewer’s permission, refer to them.
    3. It would be best if you could remember them in case you do not get the opportunity to refer to your notes. Practice your answers; it will help in your memory.
    4. If you are interested in the opportunity, indicate that to the prospective employer.
    Do’s and Don’ts: *
    1. Be on time or a few minutes ahead of the scheduled time.
    2. If an application is necessary; fill it out in its entirety. Nothing is more annoying to an interviewer than looking at a blank application if it is part of their process. This, ladies and gentlemen, applies equally to interviews with companies and recruitment firms.
    3. Remember to smile and present yourself in an energetic and professional manner always.
    4. Never speak negatively about past employers or peers.
    5. Always maintain eye contact.
    6. Ask questions that are pertinent to the position and company.
    7. Point out areas that are a match between your skills and the requirements of the position.
    8. Be prepared to discuss ways in which you have excelled or situations where you have demonstrated your initiative and ability to be proactive.
    9. Be enthusiastic and positive.
    • Bring an original copy of your resume. *
    • Always answer with a complete sentence. No “yes” or “no” answers. *
    • Never smoke or chew gum in an interview. *
    Questions: *
    Arrive prepared to answer questions about: *
    1. Your strengths and weaknesses.
    2. Why you are interested in that company.
    3. What you know about the company.
    4. Why they should hire you.
    Arrive prepared to ask questions, such as: *
    1. What would be my day to day responsibilities?
    2. What is the career path from this position?
    3. What is the company policy on promoting from within?
    4. How do I fit this role?
    Do not ask questions like: *
    1. How much vacation do you offer?
    2. Never initiate the salary question. Let your interviewer bring it up at the appropriate time.
    3. How many sick days are offered?

    Questions such as these only leave the impression that you are only interested in how this role and company will serve your needs rather than a give and take of rights, expectations and responsibilities.

    When Interviewing with a Recruiting Firm: *

    This step in the process is often underestimated and mistreated. In the current market, more than 70% of available opportunities are handled by recruitment firms.

    This includes permanent, contract, temporary and project. Please remember when you have a meeting with a recruiter whatever side of your personality you choose to display is the side your recruiter will tell their client about.

    If you mistreat your recruiter by being late, not completing their internal forms, being surly and uncooperative in the interview with them or in the time you spend in their reception area they WILL NOT REFER YOUR RESUME to their client.

    This is not because they want to be mean to you but because you are their reputation. Give this some thought…recruiters do not manufacture anything. Their product is their customer service and YOU.

    If you, the candidate, mistreat the recruiter they can only assume you will also mistreat their client. They have worked long and hard to get that client and they will not risk sending someone in who will potentially damage that relationship. Make sure to keep in mind these interview tips so you can get the job you’ve been eyeing for.

    Interview Tips 960x460 sq 1 Top 10 Tips Succeed Telephone Interviews
    Top-10-Tips-Succeed-Telephone-Interviews

    Been invited to a telephone interview? Here’s our top tops on how to ace it. *

    So you’ve applied for your dream job and been invited back for the second stage: the telephone interview. Congratulations – getting to the first stage is often the hardest part. But whether you’re a natural on phone calls or they fill you with fear, the telephone interview should not be overlooked.

    We asked career coach and ex-recruiter Michelle Baker for her top insider tips on how to succeed in the telephone interview, and maximise your chances of getting through to the next interview stage…

    What is a telephone interview?

    Telephone interviews are a way to filter out candidates who recruiters feel are unsuitable based upon the job description, personality fit and experience required. It can be carried out by HR and recruitment teams, or it might be with your potential new line-manager.

    It can be as short as 15 minutes, or take up to an hour, and it’s essentially a way for your potential new employer to ensure that your CV sticks to the facts, before they bring you in for a face to face interview.

    Image: Adobe Stock

    How do you prepare for a telephone interview? *

    First and foremost, have a snappy elevator pitch in the bank, that sums up who you are and your experience in a concise way.

    Start with your current position, and lay out your key responsibilities there. Then, summarise the key educational and professional steps you’ve taken to get there.

    Top Tip: Remember to keep it brief – three to four sentences will do. You’ve got the whole interview to go into further detail on your key achievements and skills.

    Make sure you know your CV and cover letter inside out. This is what you’ll be questioned on, after all, so make sure you’re prepared for questions about your employment and education experience. The best part of a telephone interview is that you can keep your CV in front of you, so you can refer to it if you get tongue tied.

    Top Tip: In the call, they’re going to be fact checking your CV and cover letter, so make sure you go over these and think of anecdotal evidence of your previous experience that you can share on the phone.

    It’s also important to show your enthusiasm for the job on a telephone interview. Drawing from her experience, Michelle says:

    “The one factor that influenced me above all others was that they expressed a sense of occasion; that this was important, they really wanted the job, they were enthusiastic and even if they didn’t have all the qualifications or experience, they sold themselves to me. In doing so they gave me confidence that they would do a great job of representing not only themselves, but also myself and my company.”

    How do you conduct a phone interview? *

    While the interviewer can’t see you, it’s still a good idea to dress smart. This will help you feel more professional, and you’ll carry out the phone interview more confidently. Plus, if your phone signal cuts out and you have to resort to video interview, at least you’ll look the part!

    Next up, when you answer the phone make sure you sound professional – not like you’re greeting your mates!

    “Be sure to smile too, as this naturally ensures you sound enthusiastic. You could even try standing up, as this will make you feel more assertive” says Michelle.

    When it comes to answering competency-based telephone interview questions, try to use the STAR technique, where you lay out the situation you were facing, the task you had to do, the action you took and what the result was.

    • Situation: Start by outlining the situation you were in.
    • Task: Talk about the task at hand. What was required of you?
    • Action: What did you do? What action/s did you take and why?
    • Result: Summarise the results of your actions.

    This will help you to show your experience for the position, and to formulate your answers in a clear, concise and confident manner.

    Image: Adobe Stock

    Typical Telephone Interview Questions *

    Each telephone interview is different, but according to Michelle:

    “Questions are used in a way to confirm the details on the CV were correct, gaps in the CV can be accounted for, that the experience matches the language used by the individual, the confidence matches the level of experience, and the candidate can demonstrate their work in a variety of ways.”

    Job interview questions will be varied, but you’re likely to be asked questions in line with the below, so it’s a good idea to prepare for them using the STAR technique.

    • Tell me about yourself and your experience
    • Why do you want to work in this industry?
    • Why do you want this role?
    • Why do you want to work at this company in particular?
    • What is your greatest achievement?
    • Can you share any experience of when you managed a team?
    • Tell me about a challenge you have faced and how you solved it
    • Where do you see your career heading in the next five years?
    • Why should we hire you?
    • What do you do in your personal time?

    Of course, some interviewers have been known to put some curveball questions out there, but these are more of a test of the way you cope in the face of pressure.

    Common telephone interview mistakes *

    A common mistake people make when on a telephone interview is that they start to waffle. It’s easy to do, when you can’t see the recruiter’s face it’s tricky to gauge what they’re thinking! But don’t worry about silences on the call, it’s not your job to fill them, feel comfortable to stop talking when you have made your point.

    People can make the common mistake of thinking that the interview is less formal when it takes place on the phone, but it’s important that you treat it in the exact same way that you would a face-to-face interview. Dress smart, keep it professional, and make sure you’re fully prepared.

    What should you ask your interviewer? *

    Asking questions during a telephone interview is a good idea, and shows your aptitude to the job in question. This is not the time to ask about holiday entitlement, or company bonuses; you should use this as an opportunity to find out about what the day to day entails, how big your potential team will be, and what opportunities for career progression are.

    As long as you prepare, act confident and show your enthusiasm for the role, you’ll do brilliantly. Remember to write down your feedback after the phone interview too, such as questions you weren’t prepared for, or questions you wish you’d asked, so that you can prepare better for next time.

    Top tips for keeping calm during a phone interview *

    –          Plan ahead

    –          Find a quiet place with no distractions

    –          Count to ten before the call

    –          Control your breathing

    –          Have your CV to hand

    –          Stay positive

    –         Have water at the ready

    If you’ve been invited through to the next stage, read our top tips to nailing your first face to face interview.

    Related articles *

    Dress for Success: What to wear to a job interview?

    6 questions to ask at an interview

    Tips to help you prepare for a second interview

    This content is created from https://www.https://www.completestaff.com.au//worklife/top-10-tips-succeed-telephone-interviews-10080/ with Octolooks Scrapes

    Resume Tips sign Copy 11 Cv Factors You Shouldn 8217 t Forget
    11 Cv Factors You Shouldn’t Forget

    If time spent writing your CV is really just time spent staring at a blank screen, you’re not alone, we’ve been there too.

    There are no two ways about it – condensing all of your skills and experience into one slick document can be challenging. We aren’t born knowing how to write a great CV, so it’s up to you to find out for yourself how to get the basics right. From font size and format to photos and filling in the gaps, there is a certain etiquette that should rarely be broken. Recruiters and employers receive constant streams of applications – don’t let a basic mistake send yours straight to the bottom of the pack.

    Here are the answers to 11 crucial questions regarding your CV.

    1. How long should a CV be?

    When it comes to length, try to think of your CV as a tasty appetizer that will get people coming back for more. It should be around 2 pages long to ensure that you get your message across quickly, without dragging on like an old encyclopedia, boring employers and recruiters.

    If you feel your experience is as good as gold (and listing it all will make you a shoe-in for the job), don’t worry too much about going over. Just be sure to keep it at 3 pages or less.

    1. What do employers look for in a CV?

    They want someone who has the right skills and knowledge to do the job at hand, so these need to come across in your CV. If you have the exact experience they are looking for, make sure it is clear – don’t make them have to read between the lines or join the dots. Spell everything out for them. If you don’t have the perfect profile for the role but know you can do it, highlight your transferrable skills. It’s always important to research your target roles beforehand to find out exactly what they are looking for in an applicant.

    1. What font should I use in my CV?

    The saying ‘keep it simple stupid’ exists for a reason and is definitely a principle that applies here. Forget cursive text that makes your CV look like an excerpt from Tom Riddle’s diary, and best you steer clear of Webdings altogether. Nice symbols, though. Use a simple font that looks professional and is easy for recruiters and employers to read. Size matters too – you can’t go wrong if you stick around the 10/12pt mark.

    1. Should I include a photo on my CV?

    Generally speaking, your best Blue Steel needn’t grace its presence on your CV. Unless you are applying for an acting or modelling job (which would most likely specifically request photographs), there is no need to include one on your CV. It will take up space that could be better used with text that demonstrates the value of hiring you. Show them how you’re so much more than just a pretty face.

    1. Do I include all of my experience on my CV?

    You should include all of your experience on your CV for transparency, but older or irrelevant roles can be shortened down to brief summaries. All of your previous roles were NOT created equal. It is important to bring out the most relevant points and let other bits take the backseat.

    1. Should I include my date of birth on my CV?

    Age is only a number, right? Employers do not make recruitment decisions based on a candidate’s age, so there’s no need to include your date of birth.

    1. Should I hide employment gaps on my CV?

    Take the guesswork out of your CV. You don’t want recruiters or employers scratching their heads trying to fill the gaps themselves, so if you have long periods of unemployment you should be up front and explain them. Keep this short and sweet. After all, it’s just to let them know what was keeping you occupied during that time. Ideally use constructive reasons such as personal projects, study or travelling.

    1. Should I include interests on my CV?

    As a general rule, only include interests if they are relevant to the roles you are applying for and will make a positive impact on your applications. If you feel including your passions or pastimes adds to the profile you want to show your employer, put them in, but don’t get too carried away. Always keep it as professional as possible.

    1. Do I need a cover letter?

    Typing a persuasive, personalized cover letter shows you are serious about your career and the opportunity. It should paint a clear picture of who you are and what you are looking for, and why you want to engage in further conversation.

    1. Should I include references in my CV?

    Employers won’t contact references until they have intentions of potentially offering you the job. You don’t need to list them on your CV. Instead, a one-liner like ‘references available upon request’ will do the trick.

    1. What if I have no experience?

    Everyone has to start somewhere, so no need to worry if this sounds like you. This is where you need to bring out everything you have done, that will set you up for success in the working world. Think training, education, high school pursuits, extra projects, charity or volunteer work, etc.

     

    Interview prep sq 1 Interview Tips You Should Never Miss
    Interview Tips You Should Never Miss

    Someone said on Twitter, these are not rocket science, but really timely interview tips of the basics.

    Do you know how to sell yourself in an interview? Have you found yourself freezing up? Have you ever had a question where you have not been able to work out what the interviewer was asking – or you could give an answer, but didn't know if it was the right one? Here are my top 10 interview tips for this month.

    1) Research the organization:

    Everyone gets nervous in interview. It's a big occasion and you should be nervous. However if you start with some thorough research, you start to build a case in your own mind of why you should be sitting in that interview room or in front of a panel. Having some confidence is a solid first step to overcoming nerves.

    You can actually tell a lot about an employer from the employment pages of their website. Things such as the values they have, how easy it is to find out about potential jobs and their responses to you when you apply, can all tell you about the way they handle their recruitment. This in turn may be a reflection of what it's like to work there. If it's friendly and easy to apply for a job, then chances are they have given some thought to why you would want to work for them.

    The web is a such wealth of facts, but what you need to do, is turn this into information. You can look at annual reports, media releases and product and service information. Online directories have company information and Google indexes the latest media news and references from other sources. If a career page has an email contact for an employee, and invites contact, then do it. Often companies will use testimonials that way to attract new people. Use sites such as linked in to research companies.

    When you look for this information, you are not just looking for a set of unrelated facts. You should be looking for reasons that you want to work for that employer. You'll really impress the interviewer if you find some simple yet compelling reasons as to why you want to work for the employer and what appeals to you about the role.

    2) Research the role:

    One thing that constantly surprises me is that how few people really have any understanding of the role that they are applying for. Job advertisements are partly to blame for this. They are often misleading. The person writing the advert is often not the person that you'll be reporting to. Things always sound different on paper compared to what you will actually be doing in the role.

    One of my clients recently applied for a job in the public sector. The position description said:

    Building effective communication strategies with a variety of stakeholders and colleagues to ensure information exchanges are timely, accurate and useful.

    This is what this statement meant:

    Providing advice to staff and students on the status of their research applications.

    If you see something like the above, try to talk to someone who knows about the role. A good question to ask is "what does a typical day/week look like?" Once you know what's expected of you, preparing for the interview is instantly easier.

    Also important is a real insight into the role and the recruitment process. Dig deeper than the advertisement. Put a call through if a contact number is provided. You can find out which of the skills that the employer requires are actually the priority. You can determine what you can do without and importantly you can start to make yourself known (in a good way) to your future employer. Even if the advertisement doesn't invite it, you can still contact the recruiter. If there are no contact details, be scrupulously polite, it usually means the employers are expecting a deluge of applications.

    Ask them questions about the recruitment process, what the steps are, how long each step takes, and whether they've had many applicants. You'd be surprised at the information you'll receive if you sound polite and interested.

    3) Research yourself:

    Employers want you to be self-aware. Have a long hard look at what you have achieved, the way you have achieved that result and the skills you developed or demonstrated along the way.

    This type of reflection helps you understand your strengths. It gives you confidence and helps you overcome nerves.

    4) Interviewer insight:

    No two interview processes are the same. Depending on the organization and the role, you could be interviewed by a recruitment consultant, the HR department, the line manager, all three individually, or any combination. Each will have a different agenda for the interview. This is important to remember as your approach with each should be slightly different.

    The recruitment consultant is always the first screener.

    Their role is to match you to the employer's requirements and sell you as an applicant. The consultant establishes their credibility with each good candidate they put forward to the employer. Take time to woo them, even if you think they don't know their stuff (as is a common criticism). Their role is essentially a sales one: to sell you the job and, if they believe you are right for the role, to sell you to their client. Make the consultant's role easier by focussing on your strengths and achievements and point out why you are a good match.

    The HR consultant is usually the recruitment procedural expert. One of their jobs is to ensure the organization meets its legal requirements. They often set up the recruitment process and have a strong attachment to ensuring it is working. It's a safe bet that you will face a more structured interview from them, than you will from a line manager. They are often the employer's first screener and may need to sell you further, depending on their position and influence within the organisation.

    The line manager will be the person who is most concerned about finding someone for the role. They may be a person down or not meeting their organisation's objectives by being understaffed. In the interview it will be the line manager who has the greatest sense of urgency about filling the role. Focus on your workplace achievements when fielding their questions. Work hard to build a rapport with them. They will be assessing your fit for their team.

    It may sound obvious but treat each interviewer as if they don't talk to each other and know anything about you. You'd be amazed at how little communication sometimes goes on between each party.

    5) Practice:

    Most organizations now use behavioural questions – which means they will be expecting you to provide specific examples of where you have demonstrated the skill they are seeking.

    I strongly suggest practicing for an interview and seeking professional help. A professional is skilled at drawing examples out of you and finessing the ones you already have. However never rote learn your lines as you can never predict all the recruiter will ask. Memorizing answers will make you stressed in the interview if you can't recall what you want to say. You may even be not be answering the questions the interviewer asks.

    6) Build rapport:

    Be friendly. People like that!

    One of the best ways to relax is to assume the interviewer is on your side. Good interviewers are not interested in tripping you up. In fact, most of them are on your side, or are at the very least they will be approaching the interview in a professional manner. It may even help to you to relax if you think of the interviewer as someone who wants you to do your best

    7) Give yourself time:

    Leave plenty of time to get to the interview. Rushing breeds panic. No matter what excuse you have, lateness is noted. It creates a negative impression and it puts you behind immediately. Allowing waiting time for an interview gives you time to compose yourself, gather your thoughts and be mentally prepared.

    8) Please be yourself:

    That is please be yourself. You will be doing yourself no favours if you try and suppress your personality, or pretend to be something that you aren't.

    9) Relax:

    While you think this may be the perfect job for you, it may be that it's not. There are other jobs out there. If you keep this in mind then you'll remove some pressure from yourself that this is your only chance to perform.

    If you think the interview is going badly, relax and use it as practice for the next one. You never know, you could even recover if you take this approach.

    10) An insider's tip is one of the best interview tips:

    The interview is just the formal means of assessing your suitability as a candidate. However you are not just assessed there. Each interaction you have with your future employer feeds into the bigger picture of their impression of you. Use this knowledge. Be polite and friendly with whomever you meet in the process from the very first phone call to the last goodbye to the receptionist on your way out.

    Interviews can be daunting. Please contact me if you need some help putting it all into practice or just some extra advice. Here's another blatant plug. Explore more job interview tips with professionals to enhance your interview skills.

    Recruitment process sq 1 How To Make Career Success Your New Year 8217 s Resolution
    How To Make Career Success Your New Year’s Resolution

    Every year around this time, many people approach the new year with a sense of optimism and determination, vowing to make a number of life changes and self-improvements. Healthy food is consumed, gym parking lots are full and everyone is at their best. Unfortunately, by late January, most have already fallen off the wagon and abandoned their new year’s resolutions.

    According to a study by the University of Sydney, 92 percent of all new year’s resolutions fail. How is it possible that so many good intentions can fall through the cracks? Psychology professor Paul Herman describes this as the “false hope syndrome.” Herman points out that most people fail because their resolutions aren’t realistic. They underestimate the difficulty of the task and the time required to accomplish it. There are a number of approaches one can take that may not guarantee success, but can certainly increase the odds. Let’s look at a few tips that will help you achieve your resolutions and set you up for career success in the new year.

    Don’t make resolutions you can’t control *

    Perhaps your new year’s resolution is to get a promotion at work. You’ve been with the company for several years, gained the necessary skills and experience, and proven your interest and determination. Unfortunately, a part of this resolution is beyond your control. Maybe there are no current job openings. Maybe there’s another candidate who is equally qualified, or perhaps more so. Maybe they’ll be offered the position, but they won’t be a good fit and it will be offered to you the following year. While it’s good to have career goals and continue to work toward them, hinging your resolution on something that is ultimately someone else’s decision can leave you feeling a sense of failure, even though you did everything required to succeed.

    Don’t bite off more than you can chew *

    Just because it’s a new year and you’re looking to make some positive changes, presumably your everyday responsibilities won’t change. You’ll still have the same commitments you had last year – to your wife or husband, to your kids, to your employer, to your friends. Therefore, keep these commitments in mind when making your resolutions, and try to keep them realistic. Instead of vowing to get a degree or a certification, start by just taking one class. Each small step will move you closer to your larger goal. Celebrate your success by reaching small goals – don’t regret your failure by not reaching big ones.

    Take baby steps *

    Whatever your resolution may be, look at it with a micro view, not a macro one. Work small steps into your daily or weekly routine, and don’t expect to knock out large portions at once. If your goal is to read a book about a new subject or for a course you’re taking, focus on reading one or two pages a night, not on finishing the book in a week or two. There’s nothing wrong with starting small, and if you find you have more time in your schedule than you anticipated, you can always increase your efforts. On the other hand, taking on too much to begin with will only cause stress and frustration, and will most likely leave you feeling overwhelmed and defeated.

    Set a realistic timeframe *

    A common reason that new year’s resolutions fail is the lack of an appropriate timeframe. Not setting a target date invites procrastination, and while there may be several months left in the year, an “I’ll get to it when I have time” attitude can easily lead to unmet goals and feelings of failure. Likewise, setting a target date that’s too soon can lead to similar frustration. Choose a date that’s realistic for completing your resolution, and that will allow you to balance the extra work with your daily schedule. Once it’s set, hold yourself accountable. Ensure you’re taking the necessary steps on a regular basis to achieve your goal on the chosen date. While some resolutions may benefit from a partner who can hold you accountable (like a workout buddy), in the end, no one will celebrate your success or regret your failure more than you.

    Only choose goals that are important *

    This sounds like a no-brainer, but some people feel they MUST have a new year’s resolution or they just aren’t improving. There’s really no shame in not having a resolution. Most resolutions fail simply because people just don’t care enough to follow through. If it’s not something that’s important to you, skip it this year and start thinking of a resolution for next year that you’re truly passionate about. Without willpower, determination and a meaningful goal, you’re setting yourself up for failure, which will only have a negative psychological effect on other aspects of your life.

    Any gambler will tell you that it’s better not to gamble when the odds aren’t in your favor than to gamble and lose. Such is the case with new year’s resolutions and candidate interview questions. While we can all learn from certain failures, there’s nothing to be gained from talking about resolutions of years past that you weren’t committed enough to see through. If you’re part of the nearly 50 percent of the population who typically makes new year’s resolutions, choose a goal that’s meaningful and attainable, with a realistic target date of completion. Then above all, hold yourself accountable for achieving it so you don’t become one of the 92 percent who fail. By this time next year, you’ll be looking to repeat this year’s success instead of hoping to avoid another failed resolution attempt.

    Job search tips from our recruiters 1 774x400 sq 1 1 10 Awesome Interview Tips From Actual Hiring Managers
    10 Awesome Interview Tips From Actual Hiring Managers

    When you’re aggressively searching for a job, don’t you wish you had some interview tips from the interviewer? Do you wonder what does he really wants from you – and doesn’t want? We’ve found pure, unadulterated comments, complaints and advice from actual recruiters, hiring managers, and HR professionals that they wish job seekers knew.

    Take a look at what they had to say, and pay attention. These interview tips may help you land that job! *

    Caveat: all hiring managers are different, and what works for one may not work for another. If you can learn from their LinkedIn profile about the person you’ll be meeting with, you may be able to judge which of these interview tips may work best for them.

    1) Know when to be quiet are just one of the interview tips you must bear in mind! *

    • “It’s OK to stop talking. I’ve interviewed far too many people who just don’t know when to shut up. Some people are nervous. Others are unsure. Some people don’t think for a second before they start blabbing, and they’re STILL trying to talk over the interviewer as they try steer them towards the next question.” – Reddit
    • One recruiter concurred, saying an otherwise-qualified candidate may dash their chances by being too long-winded during an interview as it may indicate he or she may not be good at picking up on conversational cues and may raise doubts ability the candidate’s ability to organize their thoughts. – US News
    • Another recruiter said that a candidate who kept silent after being asked a difficult question scored bonus points for not answering too quickly. The interviewer said that the silence indicated that the candidate was mature and confident enough to deal with the pressure appropriately. Silence may indeed be golden. – Pongo Resume

    2) Write a unique, well-prepared cover letter! *

    • “Cover letters really are important. Oh my god they are so important. Yes, you are repeating much of the same information as your resume, but it’s your chance to show me why it’s relevant to this opportunity. Selling yourself in this manner is a great skill. And so much easier to read than a list. And so much easier to dismiss you if you call the company or the job by the wrong name.” – Reddit
    • A recruiter stated that a small fraction of applicants take the time to produce a unique cover letter, allowing that candidate to stand out and worthy of consideration even when the resume may not be the best. – US News
    • Another was blunt in saying that most cover letter “stink, ” and that candidates should endeavor to create a brilliant one. When a great cover letter crosses this recruiter’s desk, it influences his or her interest in the author. – The Muse

    3) Yes, good manners count! *

    • “Don’t interrupt the question being asked, by trying to finish it off yourself as if you and I are on the same wavelength. It’s rude, downright annoying, and honestly it’s pretty cheesy thinking that you are finishing my sentences.” – Reddit
    • “Always be nice to the receptionist/anyone you come in contact with when you show up for the interview. If you’re a jerk to the person at the front desk, there’s a good chance they’ll say something to the person you’re there to see. Plus, it’s never too early to start making friends with support staff.” – Reddit

    4) Be punctual – but don’t arrive too early! *

    • One recruiter suggests that a candidate arrive no more than five or ten minutes early. Showing up too long before a scheduled appointment may make an interviewer feel rushed, creating an unfavorable impression even before they’ve set eyes on each other. – US News
    • “Don’t be late either. And if you are, ‘I couldn’t find the building’ or ‘I didn’t think it would take so long to get here’ are terrible excuses. Makes me think you have no research skills and can’t plan ahead.” – Reddit

    5) Be prepared! *

    • “For goodness sake, do a little research beforehand and have a few questions about the job and or employer lined up. At the end of an interview if I ask the candidate if they have any questions for me (which I always do) and they just sit there slack jawed, it really feels like they don’t really want the job. The interview process is your opportunity to figure out if the job is right for you, use it.” – Reddit

    6) Prove you’re unique! *

    • “The most important thing to remember in an interview is that you are competing with other applicants and want to set yourself apart from them. Everyone is qualified for the position, the entire point of the interview is to find out if you can present yourself in real life as well as you do on paper. (And to see if your personality is a good fit for the office.) Your entire job is making them remember you.” – Reddit

    7) Be honest! *

    • “Don’t lie…just don’t do it. You will be found out. It might not happen immediately but the truth will come out and what might seem like a small lie will snowball into something out of control.”– Reddit
    • Another recruiter recommended avoiding using “perfectionism” as the answer to the question, “what’s you greatest weakness?” You may come off as disingenuous and may even look like you’re avoiding the question. Not being realistic may make the interviewer think you can’t or won’t come up with a realistic assessment of areas for improvement. – US News

    8) Speak up! *

    • “It seems so basic, but it never ceases to amaze me how many people – even at senior level – don’t bother to do their homework properly about the companies and people they are being interviewed by. There really is no excuse for it in the age of the internet, and it makes us think ‘why should we employ you when you can’t even be bothered to find out how we work?'” – Career Structure
    • “For goodness sake, do a little research beforehand and have a few questions about the job and or employer lined up. At the end of an interview if I ask the candidate if they have any questions for me (which I always do) and they just sit there slack jawed, it really feels like they don’t really want the job. The interview process is your opportunity to figure out if the job is right for you, use it.” – Reddit

    9) Follow up! *

    • An interviewer stated that a thank-you note sent as a follow-up to a meeting isn’t just good manners. More than one in five hiring managers surveyed by CareerBuilder say they are less likely to hire a candidate who didn’t send a thank-you note. – Career Builder
    • “Follow up is huge, in my experience. I don’t see this enough from candidates I interview. Getting an email or a letter from someone I interviewed would make them stand out from the other people applying for the job – both because it’s rare, and because it shows they are actually interested in the position. The follow up shows you’re actually interested in the employer, and that they’re not just one of a hundred employers you’re sending resumes to.” – Reddit
    • “Even if you think an offer is in the bag, you can always improve your chances of getting the job if you send a thank-you letter.” – Fast Company

    10) But be patient! *

    • “Please don’t follow up every day. It doesn’t show that you’re more dedicated or enthusiastic. At best it will come off as annoying, at worst it will feel like you don’t respect the person’s time. You have to remember that the hiring managers/interview team are making these decisions on top of their regular responsibilities, so don’t get too discouraged if you don’t hear back right away.” – Reddit
    • “My advice? Send thank you emails after each interview and then wait. If you get another offer in the interim and are going to accept, inform the recruiter. I think every recruiter on the planet wants to give their candidates a first-class experience, but we have limited resources. If you’re too aggressive or unpolished during the interview process, companies will think, ‘Wow, this person is going to be really high maintenance if we do hire them. Pass!'” – Brazen

    Again, every interviewer is different and not all will agree with every single one of the above interview tips. But we found many hiring professionals each of whom expressed the same opinion on the above topics. Paying attention to these interview tips may help distinguish you from your competitors and help you get the job.

     

    I need job 300x206 1 I Need A Job
    I Need A Job

    I need a job!

    Sick of saying it? The coming year looks positive for job seekers, with the rise of the services economy shifting away from manufacturing and providing more job opportunities for contractors and work-from-home roles making up the list of Available Jobs for 2019.

    According to the latest SEEK Job Growth Report, some of Australia’s fastest-growing jobs can be found in education, government and defense, design, and farming and conservation, offering a variety of opportunities across the country.

    Education & Training *

    The rate of population growth within Australia is higher now than it was for the Baby Boomers, putting pressure on Australia’s education system and driving demand for additional teachers across multiple disciplines. This growth, combined with an influx of parents striving to set their children up for academic success, is also impacting the tutoring industry in a positive manner.

    The education and training industry is projected to:

    • Grow 13.3 percent by 2018 – nearly doubling last year’s projection (Industry Projections to November 2019, Department of Employment)
    • Create 58,900 more jobs within five years
    • See 222,000 university undergraduate degrees completed in 2019/2020 (up 25,000), according to the Department of Education

    Hot jobs & the courses to help get you there:

    • Teacher Aides & Special Needs Teachers: The latest SEEK Job Growth Report shows the demand for these roles has grown by 112%, with the average salary also increasing slightly (8.8%) over the past year. Get prepared to provide individual support to students with a certificate III in Education Support (CHC30213) – no prerequisites required.
    • Primary School Teachers: The SEEK Report also states that the number of job advertisements for teachers in the primary school sector has increased by 96%. If you’re interested in working as a primary school teacher in Australia, you will be required to have a bachelor degree in Primary Education or a postgraduate degree in Primary Education.
    Healthcare and Medical *

    The demand for healthcare and medical workers is being boosted across the country as a result of the aging population and advanced medical treatment technologies.

    Consequently, the healthcare and medical industry will see:

    • Job numbers grow 16.3 percent by November 2019, as predicted by the NSW Government
    • Australia faces a shortfall of 109,000 nurses by 2025 (Health Workforce Australia)
    • The trend towards more specialised nursing continues, as experienced nurses approach retirement age and technology makes its mark on the sector
    Government & Defence *

    Jobs in the government and defence sector were in hot demand in 2019, with public service employment in the air force, police and corrections, and policy analysis expected to grow substantially in the New Year.

    Hot jobs & the courses to help get you there:

    • Government workers: Job ads for local government workers saw an increase of 77% over the past year across Australia, with federal government roles doubling in Victoria. Looking forward, employment for Intelligence and Policy Analysts to November 2019 is expected to also experience very strong growth (Department of Employment). These Government and Defence courses are a sample of the kinds of courses that can lead to work with the local, state, or federal government, or a role in the navy, army, or air force.
    Design & Architecture *

    The demand for design professionals sky-rocketed in 2019, with the need for architects and interior designers to increase across the country.

    In a promising outlook for both sectors:

    • The Housing Industry Association now forecasts over 183,000 new dwellings will be built in 2019
    • Federally funded programs such as Generate Design are seeing innovation and growth brought into Australia’s $33 billion creative industries, fuelling demand for services

    Hot jobs & the courses to help get you there:

    • Interior Designers: In 2019, the interior design industry experienced job growth of 62%, with the average salary of an Interior Designer sitting at $76,203. Aspiring Interior Designers have the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of interior design with a Diploma of Interior Design & Decoration (MSF50213).
    • Architects: Demand for architects has escalated over the past few years making the profession one of the most sought after in Australia. To work as an architect, key skills include strong design capabilities, an aptitude for business, engineering knowledge, and an understanding of the relevant laws.
    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) *

    ICT professionals play a vital role across almost every industry in Australia as technology becomes more integral to every facet of our lives. As an enabler of productivity and innovation in the economy, ICT is unmatched with an increased need for more specialist skills.

    • The Department of Employment is predicting strong growth in the demand for technology professions of 12.8 percent by the end of 2019 (Occupation Projections to November 2019, Department of Employment)
    • The highest growth nationwide is expected for computer network professionals, with a 20.5 percent increase projected (Industry Projections to November 2019, Department of Employment)
    Building Trades *

    It’s a great time to be in the building trades, with the construction industry expected to grow 8 percent by November 2019 (Industry Employment Projections 2019 Report, Department of Employment). Building trades jobs are in demand across the country (and not just in urban areas), while technicians and trade workers make up more than half of the industry.

    Significant demand is evidenced by:

    • The National Skills Needs List including a number of building trades: bricklayer, cabinetmaker, carpenter, joiner, drainer, electrician, fibrous plasterer, floor finisher, gasfitter, painting trades worker, roof tiler, solid plasterer and stonemason

    Building trades expected to rise by 83,500 jobs by the end of 2019 (Industry Employment Projections 2019 Report, Department of Employment)

    Joib interview coming up sq 1 300x169 1 Interview Tips 10 Tricky Interviewers To Watch Out For
    Interview Tips: 10 Tricky Interviewers To Watch Out For

    No matter how much preparation you do for your job interview, there’s no guarantee you won’t get an absolute shock in the form of an interviewer with a totally uncomfortable style about them. Sound negative? No, it’s called being realistic. *

    Ideally you’ll be greeted by someone who’s relaxed, friendly, professional and approachable. Following their lead will be relatively straightforward and natural. Your nerves will be put at ease early on in the meeting, leaving room for you to ace your answers and prove yourself. Unfortunately, this perfect type of interviewer doesn’t surface every time. Instead, you might find yourself confronted with a really difficult person. They might not be the hiring manager you expected to see, or your new potential boss, but for whatever reason, getting this unknown person’s tick of approval has become a pre-requisite for winning your dream role.

    Interviewer 1: Robotic Rhonda

    RR might as well be a brick wall with a brain. She asks questions in monotone and stares at you blankly while you reply, offering little conversation in return. She does not show any emotion and appears to be running through a list.

    Interviewer 2: Timid Tim

    You can barely hear TT when he asks questions. He appears extremely nervous, and struggles to maintain eye contact, perhaps this is his first time interviewing someone? And you thought you were scared!

    Interviewer 3: Joker Josh

    JJ has a huge personality, and isn’t afraid of trying out his latest comedy routines on you. He makes several inappropriate jokes and you don’t know when he’s being sarcastic and when he’s having you on, waiting for a reaction. You can’t help but feel like you aren’t being taken seriously the whole time.

    Interviewer 4: Hyperactive Holly

    HH is like a bull at a gate as soon as you walk in. She’s here, there and everywhere. Her questions are fired out of her mouth at a million miles an hour and she interrupts your questions with her own anecdotes. She nods along intensely as you talk and maintains eye contact the whole time. HH is full on!

    Interviewer 5: Pressurer Paul

    PP will stare you down and make you work hard. He will ask you difficult, trick questions that don’t seem to have an obvious point, he will phrase questions in a negative way and make you feel like you’re being investigated, rather than interviewed.

    Interviewer 6: Overly-friendly Fiona

    OFF really wants to be your best friend. They spend half of your interview time asking you irrelevant questions about your favorite breed of dog and have a “oh my gosh, me too!” response to everything you say. She doesn’t seem too interested in your skills or expertise, but more what ice cream flavor you enjoy the most.

    Interviewer 7: Rushed Rob

    RR makes you feel like he has a million other things he needs to be doing. He makes you feel like his time is unbelievably precious and you’re kind of wasting it by being there. He’ll shoot questions out quickly and nod along preemptively as you speak, in an effort to speed things up.

    Interviewer 8: Frowning Fanny

    FF seems really irritated. She seems offended by everything you say and wears a really sour look on her face the whole time. She makes you feel like you’re really annoying her; draining her of all energy. Your attempts at a light-hearted joke to lighten the mood go ignored.

    Interviewer 9: Hurricane Henry

    HH is potentially the most unorganized person you’ve ever come across in your life. He has no idea what he’s doing there, what you’re doing there, what the role is and what he should be asking you. He has coffee stains on his shirt and his hair looks like a mad scientist’s. He’s clearly been asked to step in for someone off sick, and he’d doing a bad job of hiding the fact he has no clue what’s going on.

    Interviewer 10: Bored Bill

    BB makes you feel like he’d rather be literally anywhere else in the world. He yawns when you speak and asks questions that come out as half-finished sentences that you have to guess the end of for him.

    How to deal…

    It’s important for candidates to be themselves in an interview and let their true personalities shine out, however it is also extremely important to be aware of social cues, as well as the pace and tone being used by the interviewer, and adapt accordingly. It’s exactly the same as if someone you recognize rushes past you in the street, clearly running late to something, and so waves a quick hello to you before continuing on, barely stopping to make eye contact. You would not then call out that person’s name, and have them stop and explain to you how they’ve been, how their day’s going, where they’re off to and so forth – it’s all about knowing when to take someone else’s lead. They want to keep moving, so let them.

    If you’re confronted with one of the above interviewers, you’re going to have to follow their lead. Always remember not to say what you think they want to hear, but stay true to yourself and answer honestly. Don’t let their intensity or flippant demeanor rock you or stumble you. Don’t take their attitude personally – they don’t even know you. Just focus on delivering the messages you’ve been preparing for and practicing.

     

    Cover Letter sq 300x200 1 Nail Your Cover Letter
    Nail Your Cover Letter

    If you really want the job you’ve been dreaming about, you’ll need to put forth a little more effort and nail your cover letter.

    Most employers expect to see a cover letter with every submitted resume. They are no longer optional. Even if they were, why would you pass up an opportunity to explain why you’re perfect for the job? This is your chance to showcase your personality and convince the employer to call you as opposed to any other applicant.

    The last thing you want to do is lie on your resume or cover letter. Hiring managers want to hire you, not a representation of what you think they want. All lies will eventually come out. The cover letter is a chance to explain everything that won’t fit on your resume and present yourself as the perfect candidate. Now that you realize how important it is, here are some tips to boost the quality of your cover letter and get your dream job!

    Address your cover letter to the right person *

    This may take a little research on your part, but if it’s at all possible, address your cover letter to a specific person. “To Whom It May Concern” is not only overused, but it shows a lack of effort. It’s especially embarrassing if you use this and the name of the manager is in the job ad. It shows you just don’t care. That’s not the impression you want to give.

    Call the company and get the name of the person the application is going to. Taking this extra step will not only show that you are sincere about getting the job, but you respect the manager enough to find out his or her name. Doing your research also help avoid embarrassing mistakes such as addressing your letter to a Mr. Chris Smith, when Chris is actually a woman.

    Put emphasis on what you can do for them — not what they can do for you *

    The cover letter is time for you to highlight your skills and what makes you the perfect candidate. The interview will be the time for more of an exchange and to convey your enthusiasm for the job. Right now, you’re trying to convince them of why they should call you in. If they get a feeling that you only want the job for superficial reasons (pay, prestige, etc.), they’ll think that you’re only trying to take. A good employee recognizes that to be successful, you have to give and take.

    The hiring manager wants to see what you can bring to the company to help them grow and succeed. It’s fine to show a little enthusiasm in your cover letter, but spin it to how it will benefit the company. Think something like, “I’ve been following your company since it’s start up and I’ve love to bring my skills to the team.” Then give some suggestions on how you can do that.

    Don’t just summarize your resume *

    The hiring manager already has a copy of your resume. Don’t use your cover letter to rewrite your job history in paragraph form. Elaborate on certain jobs and emphasize what skills you used and achievements you made there.

    If you’re new to the employment field, use experiences from school. You can talk about how you’re always chosen to be the group leader in class and it gave you ample opportunity to develop management skills needed to bring to your future position. The cover letter is the place for you to talk about experiences that won’t fit on your resume.

    Customize your cover letter for every position you apply for *

    Hiring managers can smell a stock letter from a mile away. Also, if you’re using the same letter and just changing small details such as the job title or the manager’s name, you’ll eventually slip up and send the wrong letter to a job. There’s no faster way to get your application in the trash.

    Every new application should have a new cover letter. It’s work to rewrite your cover letter, but it’ll payout. It shows the hiring manager that you’ve done your research and you desire the position you’re applying for. Include a specific fact that only pertains to the company you’re applying for such as “I enjoyed the post on your company blog about…It helped me to…”

    Call to action *

    Now that you have some tips, take the time to research your dream job. Visit the company’s website and take some notes. Take key points from your resume and tell a story about them. Discuss your enthusiasm for the job, but put your emphasis on what you can bring to the company. It’s not hard to write a cover letter, just takes a little bit of thought!

    Resume Tip sign 15 Resume Writing Mistakes Costing You Interviews
    15 Resume Writing Mistakes Costing You Interviews

    Your Resume is an important part of your armory when looking for a job.Avoid these 15 Resume Writing Mistakes to ensure you snare you next position.

    Your Resume has to look good and be as close as possible to the job description to get you through to the next stage. As one of the first documents that someone will ask for to represent your capabilities, your Resume should be completed with focus, time and care. Resume Writing can often be the difference between securing an interview for your jobs applied, and not making the initial cut.

    If you’re guilty of any of the Resume Writing mistakes below, you’re probably costing yourself some great interviews:

    1. Bad formatting *

    Your Resume should be formatted perfectly. It should be consistent throughout in terms of bullets, text and margins. Your Resume should be readable on a mobile device as well as on a computer screen; so ensure it displays perfectly for both. Saving it as a PDF is a great way to ensure it is easy to read on tablets and phones. There is no excuse for untidy, inconsistent formatting. Check once, and then double-check this!

    2. No contact details *

    These should be clear, correct and visible. Perhaps they could be in a header to ensure they are easy to find if the pages are not kept together.

    3. Too many pages *

    The ideal length of a Resume is two pages.

    4. Jam-packed paragraphs *

    Your Resume should be split up clearly with bullet points. HR professionals and recruiters want to read the relevant information quickly and easily, and will not waste hours reading through long scripts.

    5. Hidden information *

    Your Resume needs to match as closely as possible to the job description or job requirements. Often Resume’s are selected via key words so the words that appear on your ideal job description should also (if you have the experience) appear on your Resume.

    6. A rush-job *

    Rushing to produce a Resume without really thinking through and analyzing what it is that you want to do next. Take your time to analyse yourself; self-awareness and knowing what you want and are suited to should be your first step before producing your Resume.

    Real freedom to choose and some control over what you now want must involve some self-awareness work first. My book What to do next? is a practical exercise book which can help you with this (available on Amazon).

    7. Wordy profile statement *

    Your profile statement needs to be short, strong, snappy and not generic. They need to be objective. In one or two sentences summarise and emphasise your key attributes, experience and your intended future career path.

    8. No summary of skills *

    These should be clearly visible, don’t hide them. Some people like the top part of their Resume to look like a snap shot of your experience. Your skills should be bulleted and separated and can appear under your profile statement so the reader can quickly see them.

    9. Inconsistent, incorrect tenses *

    I often see Resumes where the starting word is in the wrong tense. If you are currently working there, it should read, for example: Reviewing, Liaising etc. If, however, it is a previous role, it should read: Reviewed, Liaised. It’s an obvious one, but I see it on almost every Resume that crosses my desk.

    Perhaps this is because people update their CV as they go, and don’t necessarily go back to change old roles.

    10. Overuse of one particular word *

    Again a regular mistake that I see. People often have one word that they repeat over and over again watch out for this, it is often the first word of your responsibility bullet points. Ask a couple of people to read through and check your Resume for you.

    11. Omitting relevant qualifications/training/courses *

    Often people miss internal training or courses that they have done in the past. List all of them.

    12. Failure to quantify things *

    A great way to add strength to your bullet points is to add numbers and percentages. What did you do, what was the outcome, can you quantify it?

    13. Unorganised bullet points *

    I prefer Resume’s that have clear bullet points for each position. They can be easily read and are clear. Even within those bullet points think about which ones are at the top. The first two bullet points position you. Think about which are most impressive or most relevant to the job you are applying to and put them first.

    14. Lack of tailoring *

    For those good important jobs that you really want make sure you tweak your Resume and pull out the most relevant experience and information that you can. Change the order of bullets, add figures. Go through the job specification and match your CV as closely as you can to it. Take time over this.

    15. No references *

    Have them. Either references on request or list the names of two individuals you have asked at the bottom of your Resume.

    Fixing these problems in your Resume will help a great deal with your job search, however, you should also make sure your social media profiles match the calibre of your Resume. Make sure your Linked In profile gets just as much attention.

    The two will work together and these days both need to be strong. Also, be careful not to use too much jargon and simplify your language where possible. Some industry jargon is necessary for keyword searches, but try to stay away from inter-company jargon all over your Resume it will only alienate the reader.

    Finally, don’t forget to do your research. Find out as much as you can about the company you’re applying for; the culture, job description, their social media presence. Try to gain a true understanding of what they are looking for before you apply.

    Decide then if that is what you want and if the answer is yes, tailor your Resume with your relevant experience and attributes to match that. Avoiding these Resume Writing Mistakes will no doubt increase your success in securing an interview for more of the jobs you want.

    Want some advice? Click to obtain a free Resume Review from one of our Recruitment Advisors and see how your Resume stacks up to our 15 Resume Writing Mistakes.

    Interviews tips The Ultimate Guide To A Successful Interview
    The Ultimate Guide To A Successful Interview

    If you haven’t attended an interview for a little while, things have changed while you were away. It’s now the equivalent of going out on a blind date and expecting that gorgeous person from the ad, but finding a multi-headed hydra answering the door to you. As you’re lured into the room, you have no idea what will attempt to savage you. Today, you need to raise your whole game by going in equipped with a strategy and tooled up tactically.

    What can bite you in an interview? *

    Things used to be so easy. “Tell me about something yourself” was the work-horse question from the traditional ‘standard’ interview stable. This allowed everyone to settle down and, for the interviewee, things were very easy to handle in advance – imagine questions, practice answers, calm the nerves. Unfortunately, only about four in ten hires proved fully successful.

    Competency-based interviews were born when employers began to match a candidate’s experience to the capabilities required for the role. “Tell me about a situation/time when you …” is a characteristic question, and thankfully recognizable in an interview.

    Whereas competency-based questions look back, scenario questions were then designed to get candidates to project forward into situations they’ve not yet encountered, but might do. “What would you do in a situation where …” is typical.

    It was harder for candidates to rehearse for interviews, but by no means impossible. So, to step up the game, strength-based interviews were born. Questions are often shorter, sharper and can be more random. They’re designed to gain an insight into a candidate’s genuine likes and dislikes, on the grounds that they’ll perform and deliver at their strongest if they work on things they enjoy.

    Next up were value-based interviews. Employers realized that candidates who actually care at a deep level about the ethics and morals surrounding their job, and see the worth, will be far more effective.

    Assessment days raise the game further. A whole range of tasks, interviews and tests are used while candidates are pitched head to head en masse, to identify the stand-out ones. Sub-optimal candidates are quietly bayoneted during the day and buried at the end.

    Sprinkle in ‘creativity’ questions, presentations, testing, off-the-cuff summaries, profiling, round-the-table intros and the best question category of all: the literally unanswerable question – “Pink is bigger than dark blue?” and you’ve got a monster even Baron von Frankenstein couldn’t stitch together.

    The armory of the average interviewer is now well-stocked but the latest research confirms that hiring times have become longer, to the detriment of everyone. Faced with such complexity, how can you be sure of doing well on the day?

    Plan a strategy, execute your tactics *

    It’s obvious, that to be selected for the role, you need to be the stand-out candidate. Nothing new there, but just that’s an aspiration. Strategically, you need to show that while every interviewee is in the frame. You deliver in spades on three separate fronts: you tick all of the boxes; you’re the one bringing more to the party by way of added value and you’re demonstrably the lowest risk. Your tactics then become the specific actions you can prepare and take.

    Get hard information *

    Ring up and ask who’ll be present and the style of interview that will be used. Knowing will strongly increase your chances of hitting the mark on the day. If other candidates aren’t as well informed, you’re set to shine.

    Use all your experience *

    Dig deep through your wider experience to cover any odd weakness. The fact you have an interview booked means that this isn’t yet a show-stopper, but if you’re pressed on weakness at interview and you can plug the hole, you take away an easy cause for rejection.

    Re-research… *

    … to a much deeper level. Take in the people you’ll meet, new developments, the economic climate, competitors and the prospects for the whole sector. Develop an insight into the challenges the department or organization faces and use that to inform your preparation.

    Prepare for the style of interview *

    Draw up and rehearse a range of questions that link into the competencies, strengths, and values required for the role. Whilst those exact questions won’t arise, recognizing the style of a question, knowing a technique to deal with it, and being familiar with relevant areas of your own experience will enable you to perform at the very highest level.

    Determine your added-value *

    This is very hard to do, but that’s the point and therein lies the value. The deeper the insight you gain about the organization, the more opportunity you’ll have to show something about your background, qualifications or personality that offers a valuable bonus. Remember, better meeting the listed role or person specification is not added value, look beyond.

    Demonstrate capability *

    Aim at being the no-risk candidate. In your preparation, don’t just find one example of a competency, strength or value, dredge up every example you can. Distil down for the best and, on the day, keep the backups in reserve so that you can seamlessly show depth, if probed.

    Win before you arrive *

    Look at that hydra, smile confidently and know that you have the weapons to deal with it. You can’t control what comes at you, but you can control how you react to it. No one expects you to know everything, be everything and deliver utter perfection, (if they do, I suggest you don’t want to work for them), but if you’ve planned and prepared to the point where you can deal with the unexpected in the right way, you will get the recognition you deserve and that job offer you want.

    Cover letter resuime sq 300x300 1 10 Rules In Writing A Compelling Cover Letter
    10 Rules In Writing A Compelling Cover Letter
    Does your resume go better with a cover letter? *

    Some people say no, because nobody reads them. I agree to a point. Not all recruiters read resume cover letter. But I think many recruiters don’t because so many they see are a bit “blah blah blah.”

    That’s when the resume cover letter says nothing new or exciting, nor does it say anything about why the candidate wants the job. In a sea of such banality, one way to make your resume cover letter stand out, is just to do a good one. You can do more than that, though.

    Here are 10 rules to help you in making a compelling cover letter. *

    Rule # 1 *

    Even if the job is advertised through a recruitment consultant you can still do your research. Call them and connect with them. They will probably not give you their client’s name but they may give you an outline of the challenges of the role as they see them. Your resume cover letter becomes far more engaging if you can tell the recruiter how they’ve inspired you to want to take this opportunity further.

    Rule # 2 *

    If you know who the company is, then there is no excuse for not looking up the website, doing thorough research and reading the LinkedIn profile of their company executives. And that’s just as a start.

    The aim of this research is for you to find some compelling reasons to work for that organization and some ways that you can add value. So many people forget to say this on their cover letters.

    Rule # 3 *

    Your cover letter should clearly show you have read the job advertisement. The way you do this is to pick the key criteria in the advertisement and point out how you meet this in your letter.

    Also use keywords from the advertisement, throughout your resume cover letter. That way it has a better chance of being picked up in screening software.

    Rule # 4 *

    Try to keep your cover letter to one page and three or four paragraphs.

    The only real exception to this rule is if you are asked to respond to an “expression of interest.” An expression of interest is a mini-government selection criterion where you outline how you meet job criteria. Then your letter may run to two to three pages.

    Rule # 5 *

    Don’t be boring. Try to keep your own voice.

    Rule # 6 *

    Keep a logical format. I use “hook, ” “book, ” and “took.”

    “hook” :- specific and memorable reasons as to why you want the role
    “book” :- a coherent argument as to why you should be hired
    “took” :- what you want to happen as a result of an employer reading your letter

    Rule # 7 *

    Be personal. If you have someone’s name use it. Ideally, a cover letter should start with a title Ms, Mr or Mrs.

    The exception to this is when informality is invited. A first name is more acceptable in an informal email, perhaps if you already have had a conversation with the contact person.

    Rule # 8 *

    Type it. This sounds so basic. But I have to say this next bit because I have been asked this question.

    Yes.

    An application in writing generally means typed.

    Rule # 9 *

    Plain white paper please. Pretty pink perfumed pages or something similar are never a good idea. Your letter will be unique, but for the wrong reasons.

    Rule # 10 *

    OK I’ve crammed a few things here into one rule. A cover letter should not be:

    – a repeat of your resume
    – a standard letter that you send out to everyone
    – hard to read
    – full of spelling and grammar mistakes

    There you are! You got those rules. Make a wow impression from your recruiters and employers with your compelling resume cover letter.

    Hired Qualifications Will Get You An Interview But They Won 8217 t Get You Hired
    Qualifications Will Get You An Interview, But They Won’t Get You Hired

    Anyone who has ever gone through job search will likely be able to tell you about at least one interview they aced, only to find that the company “went in another direction” when it came time to select their new employee.

    This phenomenon is quite common – dark horse candidates get chosen all the time – but those who get the short straw in this situation nevertheless continue to be amazed and bewildered by the experience.

    Why did they hire him??? I’m far more qualified than he is!”

    Evidently, the manager saw him as a better fit for their organization.

    But I’ve got everything they asked for in the job posting! The other guy doesn’t!”

    There’s more to it than that.

    He doesn’t have the industry experience that I have, either! I don’t get it!”

    It isn’t that simple.

    It doesn’t need to be so perplexing. If you clearly understand the various phases of the interview process and their corresponding focus, you can close the deal successfully. With each phase you mis-read, on the other hand, the likelihood increases of your ultimately being rejected.

    Overview of the process: *

     

     

     

     

     Many job seekers grasp the fact that the interview is in fact a sales pitch. For any sales meeting to end successfully, the salesman must know intimately all the features and functions of the product he is selling. In this case, you are both the salesman and the product. Simply stated, then, you must be able to articulate your value as an employee.

    Of course, it doesn’t stop there. No matter how good it is, the customer isn’t going to buy your product if they don’t need it. That means that you must also know the needs of the buyer (in this case, the hiring manager). Research, then (via the company website, web searches, networking connections, etc), is invaluable. Anything which gives insight into identifying pain points for the company can provide you with an opportunity to sell a solution.

    The final step is to connect the dots. Show the interviewer how your skills match with their needs. Don’t make them work to see the connection, but spell it out for them through an impactful and compelling narrative. That’s when the buyer will be motivated to make the purchase (or to hire you).

    But I did all of that!”

    Wait, that’s just the overview. You may not have done this as effectively as you think. There are distinctly different phases to this process.

    Phase 1 – Qualifications: *

    In order for you to get the interview in the first place, you had to convince the pre-screener that you possess the skills for the job. You likely spent significant time working on your resume, crafting engaging accomplishment stories to highlight the moments in your work history when you really made a difference. No doubt your networking conversations also highlighted these skills.

    In most cases, the opening phase of the interview process will similarly be focused on these same qualifications. That means that the interviewer’s questions are likely going to deal with your education, work experience and hard skills.

    In simple terms, they want to know that you can do the job. The better you can demonstrate your abilities, the more impressed the hiring manager will be. This is where all the work you did on those accomplishment stories will pay off: the details (and especially the measurable results you achieved) are critically important, so share them confidently.

    You’re preaching to the choir. I did that, and did it very well. Why didn’t I get the job?”

    Because that was only phase I.

    Phase 2 – Passion: *

    The hiring manager wants more than your abilities; they want your passion, too. If all you want is a paycheck, you’re not likely to inspire confidence that you’ll be truly engaged and productive on the job. Thus, the interviewer is looking for assurances that you love what you do.

    The manager wants an employee who wants to work for their company, so you can expect a change in the type of questions you’ll be asked. You’ll hear things like “Why did you get into this line of work?”, “Why do you want to work for our company?”, “What do you like most about your job?”and so on.

    Did you notice the change in focus reflected in those questions?

    Umm …”

    When asked about your passion, if you answer by citing your skillset, education and work experience, you may miss the mark completely. Although you could still be quite diligent in connecting conversational dots, you’re likely not connecting the right ones. Another great accomplishment story here isn’t going to impress if it doesn’t address the question which was posed to you.

    Oh. So if I make sure that I sell my passion, I’ll get the job?”

    It’s a step in the right direction, but we’re not quite there yet. There’s still one phase left.

    Phase 3 – Cultural fit: *

    No matter how qualified and passionate you are, you won’t get hired if you don’t fit in with the team. Someone who’s disruptive to departmental cohesion isn’t worth bringing into the fold, even if he’s excellent at his job.No problem. I’m a nice guy. This should be easy.”

    Hang on. We’re not talking about something so simple as whether or not you’re a jerk. Team chemistry is more complex than that. People who are otherwise good employees often “just don’t fit in” to a particular departmental or company culture. And there could just as easily be friction between your style and your manager’s, too. No one is necessarily the bad guy when that happens; it’s just not a good match.

    The manager will want to know that you’ll be a good complement to the team before making the decision to hire you, so selling the fit is critically important. Most managers have experienced, first hand, what happens when a disruptive employee is brought on board, and they’re accordingly cautious about avoiding a repeat of the experience.

    Before you can sell a good fit, though, you’ll first need to identify whether or not one exists. That means engaging in a dialogue about the manager’s style and the departmental culture. Asking the manager questions like “How do things get done around here?”, “What soft skills are valued?”, “How would you describe your leadership style?” and “Can you describe a typical day and how you and I would interact?” will help to uncover elements of fit. Once the chemistry is thus clearly defined, showing genuine enthusiasm for the team culture is a great way to convince the manager that you’d be a great addition.

    See the Big Picture: In order to truly ace the interview, you must be sensitive to the change in focus as reflected in the type of questions you’ll be asked. Be alert to whether you’re being asked about your qualifications, your passion or the matter of fit, and target your responses accordingly.

    It all boils down to this: the hiring manager wants to know that you can do the job, but he also needs to be able to picture himself having coffee with you on Monday morning. He’s going to be spending 40 or more hours with you each week, and he doesn’t want to do that with someone he doesn’t like. Qualifications, then, are what will get you the interview, but it’s rapport that will get you hired.

    Worst cover letter mistakes 300x300 1 Resume Writing 6 Frequently Asked Questions To Take Note
    Resume Writing: 6 Frequently Asked Questions To Take Note

    What is the best practice for Resume Writing? *

    There are lots of common questions that arise when it comes to resume writing, so we thought we’d provide you with the answers to some of the most frequently asked questions to do with it. Hopefully these can be of some help!

    1) How long should my resume be? *

    Recruiters receive a high volume of resumes for each role.It’s important that yours is scannable. They can make their mind up about whether they are interested in yours quickly.

    Limiting yours to 1-2 pages is probably best. Make sure you include all of the information that you feel will be relevant to your job hunt. It is important that you do not feel restricted when you do resume writing.

    Bullet points and subheadings can help to cut down the length. This makes it easier for recruiters to identify the information they are after.

    2) What should be included in resume writing? *

    Your resume needs to provide employers with a well-rounded idea of your professional experience and career to date, highlighting all of your relevant skills and achievements.

    Some choose to write a short personal summary introducing who they are, where their experience lies and what kind of career step they are looking to make next, which is great for giving your resume a personal touch.

    The key information that should be noted on resume writing are contact information, previous work experience, education, your top accomplishments and relevant skills. Including keywords that have been used in the job description will help to ensure your resume is flagged up when resume scanning software is used.

    3) Should resume writing needs to be chronologically or functionally? *

    The format that you use for resume writing really depends on where you are in your career and the relevance of your past experience for the role you are applying for.

    A reverse Chronological Resume Writing Style is the most popular format to use and lists your previous work experience from the most recent, to the oldest, along with information about your responsibilities and achievements within each role.

    This format works well for people who have already established their career and are looking to progress in the same sector; rather than people who are looking for their first job or changing careers.

    A Functional Resume Writing is much more skills-based and places focus on the information that is most relevant to the particular role. The main substance of your resume should be a list of your top achievements and experience that is most pertinent to the job.

    You should still provide a summary of your work experience. However, this can be placed lower down on your resume; allowing you to be a bit more discreet about any employment gaps or a lack of professional experience.

    4) How should I handle employment gaps in resume writing? *

    The likelihood of an employment gap damaging your chances of landing a new job really depends on two things. One, how long ago it was. Second, how long it was for. If the period of time was years ago and you’ve been back in work for some time, it really isn’t anything to worry about and will probably go unnoticed.

    On the other hand, if your break in employment has happened more recently, which has spanned over several months or even years, then you may want to think about how you can explain this in a way that won’t hinder your job hunt.

    So before resume writing, think about what activities you’ve got involved in during that time and any unpaid experience such as volunteering or community projects that you can use to fill the gaps. You may also wish to provide a brief explanation about any gaps in your cover letter when you apply for a role.

    5) What if I have no experience? *

    If you’ve only just graduated or are looking for your first job, you may feel like you don’t have any work experience to list. You end up confused in resume writing. The key to this is showing passion. You may want to elaborate on the skills that you have developed throughout education and other non-professional experiences.

    So in resume writing, you make an enthusiastic personal summary. You can demonstrate that you are driven. Try to show that you are focused on building a career within a certain area.

    You should then provide a list of all of your qualifications, hobbies and past projects. Highlight all these that have allowed you to develop transferable skills that make you equipped for the job.

    Even if you have no formal work experience, volunteer work and undertaking projects at school/uni allow you to develop skills. You can explore areas such as customer service, time management and team work that will benefit you professionally.

    6) Should I tailor my resume? *

    Yes. What works for one role may not work for another. Thus, making alterations in resume writing for particular roles can boost your chances of being considered for the job.

    Reorder information on your resume. Position the most relevant experience in the highest part of your resume. Feature keywords used in the job descriptions by rewording information on your resume. When doing this, read the job description thoroughly. Then, match up the requirements with the experience that you possess.

    A great resume writing skill is as important as our great personality during job interviews. A well-presented resume can get us nearer to job success. So we better improve our resume writing style and ask ourselves those 6 frequently asked questions, too. So, start your job search now. Try Complete Staff Solutions. And, wow them with your good resume writing skills.

    Cover letter sq 300x199 1 1 Is Cover Letter Redundant
    Is Cover Letter Redundant?

    Not too long ago, the use of a cover letter was considered an essential component in the job application process, giving individuals the opportunity to highlight and elaborate on their relevant skills and experience in a more tailored way than on your resumé. Though in recent years, there has been a significant shift to online application systems. Cover letters are becoming less and less of a necessity.

    Obviously if a company specifies that they would like you to include a cover letter, it wouldn’t reflect particularly well on you if you weren’t to supply them with one. Definitely, you should write it to the best of your ability. If there is no reference to a cover letter, it may not actually be worth your time writing one. It is likely that they assess candidates in alternative ways . Your cover letter may not be considered.

    Recruiters don’t have the time to read a cover letter: *

    Recruiters will receive hundreds, even thousands of resumés in a working week. Frankly, they just don’t have the time to sift their way through all of them. Let alone hundreds of letters that accompany them. A large part of the time a cover letter just consists of a more elaborately worded version of your resumé anyway. You’re probably better off just making sure that all the important information is on your resume.

    Automated online systems have taken over: *

    In the past, writing a tailored letter to an employer may be popular. Companies now have specific websites. Some used forms and fields to fill out regarding the job openings and your suitability. The systems will identify exactly which job you would like to apply for and will ask specific questions regarding your qualifications, skills and aptitude, cutting straight to the point and it is likely that this is the only information that recruiters will read, rendering cover letters obsolete.

    Focus on what’s important: *

    It’s your resumé that does most of the talking when applying for a job. The way you present yourself on here will determine whether you are invited for an interview or not. It’s best to focus your energy on making it as strong and streamlined as possible. Centre your attention on customizing your resumé. Make useful connections, or building a portfolio of your work to exhibit your abilities.

    All things considered, cover letters have most likely lost the significance that they once had. Time is valuable when you are on the job hunt. You can focus on producing a polished resumé. Do not waste your time writing them. You can make a CV that’s highlighting your strengths and career achievements. Try to do a resumé that can represent you in your best light.

    Seek Job Trends Sydney Jobs Seek Employment
    Sydney Jobs Seek Employment
    SYDNEY JOBS SPOTLIGHT *

    THE EMERALD CITY WAS SHINING BRIGHTLY IN MARCH 2016 WITH AN INCREASE IN SEEK ADS FOR SYDNEY JOBS ACROSS THE MAJORITY OF INDUSTRIES.

    WHILE THE INNER SUBURBS OF SYDNEY CONTINUE TO BE THE EMPLOYMENT HOTSPOTS FOR INDUSTRIES SUCH AS CONSTRUCTION, EXPERTS ARE NOW SEEING PROMISING SIGNS OF GROWTH IN THE CITY’S WEST.

    SYDNEYJOBS MARKET HAS BEEN INCREASINGLY STRONG OVER RECENT MONTHS. THIS TREND IS REFLECTED ACROSS MUCH OF NEW SOUTH WALES, WHICH EXPERIENCED A YEAR-ON-YEAR BOOST IN SEEK JOB ADS OF 14.9% IN MARCH 2019 AND A MILD TIGHTENING OF CANDIDATE AVAILABILITY.

    “IT FEELS LIKE SYDNEY AND NSW HAVE RETURNED TO THE FRONT OF THE PACK OVER THE PAST 18 MONTHS,” SAYS MARK SMITH, DIRECTOR OF RECRUITMENT FIRM PEOPLE2PEOPLE.

    “WE’RE NOT THE POOR COUSIN TO WA ANYMORE NOW THAT THE RESOURCES BOOM IS OVER AND YOU CAN REALLY FEEL THAT IN THE MARKETPLACE. BUSINESS CONFIDENCE IS UP AND THAT’S BECAUSE, AS A STATE, WE’RE BACK.”

    GROWTH GOES WEST *

    Sydney’s CBD has always been its economic focus; however, Smith says the western suburbs are experiencing growth. “It’s like western Sydney is really shaping its own identity. It’s an interesting area to watch,” he says.

    “When you look out the window of our Parramatta office, you can see 13 cranes in the sky because the area is really beginning to build up,” adds Smith. “Traffic is also a nightmare in Sydney so people are wanting to work close to where they live, so that may also be having an influence on growth in this area of the city.

    I think the market in western Sydney is bigger than Brisbane and Adelaide put together. It’s untapped.”

    Dylan White, the partner with recruitment firm Denovo, says the entire city has a growing influence on the global stage. “It has always been a city of influence and, as the rest of the country has caught up, we are seeing Sydney take an even greater step into the spotlight,” he says. “It’s become the first major city in Oceania to operate in similar ways to New York or London.

    Traditionally, if you were an American company you would go to Europe and then Singapore or Hong Kong for expansion. Now international companies are seeing a huge talent pool in Sydney.”

    White says this may be contributing to the increase in SEEK job ads for sectors such as CEO and general management, which saw a year-on-year boost of 35% in March 2019.

    “Companies that are coming across from the US and Europe are starting their presence with just a few people and then they build brand awareness and employ a senior management team,” he explains.

    CONSTRUCTION ON THE HORIZON *

    The Sydney skyline is a good indication of the city’s growth. “There are so many cranes out there,” says Smith. “It almost worries me because there is such a boom in construction and after a boom, there is always a bust.”

    Sydney Jobs in the construction sector experienced a 21% year-on-year increase in SEEK job ads in March 2019. Related industries, such as design and architecture, grew by 14% compared to the same time last year, and SEEK job ads for trades and services were up by 24% year-on-year. Meanwhile, Sydney’s real estate and property sector saw year-on-year growth in SEEK SYDNEY job ads of 9%.

    White notes that the construction boom is creating a backlog of work for these related industries. “I think they will settle down when they catch up with the rate of construction,” he says.

    A SLIP IN FOUR SECTORS *

    Looking at the March 2016 data, only four industries experienced year-on-year declines in job ads in Sydney. Sales roles dipped only 1%; however, Smith says the industry remains steady. “We haven’t felt any change,” he says. “There’s still organic demand for sales roles.”

    Sydney Job ads for the farming, animals, and conservation sector were down by 19% and in the accounting industry, they declined by 8%. Meanwhile, the banking and financial services sector saw a decrease of 4%.

    Smith says the decline in job ads in banking and financial services may be the result of cost-cutting. “Margins are being squeezed and when you need to cut costs, you tend to go offshore,” he says. “

    This sector offshored a lot of customer service roles some time ago and then did it again with transactional accounting roles. It’s happening now to some extent with analyst roles but, as far as I’m concerned, there’s still a lot of activity in the market here.”

    As Sydney continues to assert itself as a global city, White says its job market will continue to shine. “Australia is now a more influential hub for technology and finance and we have a lot of resources that we can provide the global economy. As a result of that, Sydney is naturally the centre point for where we sit as a nation.”

    Body language video interview 1024x512 sq 300x150 1 Body Language For Interviews
    Body Language For Interviews

    I felt butterflies in my stomach, checked my watch every few minutes and reviewed answers to potential interview questions in my mind until I was invited into the room. 

    In short, I was grossly anxious, feeling like Shy Ronnie:

    Then I discovered, through first-hand experience, that your mind doesn’t just control your body; it’s reciprocal – your body can control your mind. 

    You can actually trick your mind to project confidence, calmness and happiness through the actions of your body, even if you feel like throwing up inside. Regardless your subject of work, ranging from marketing to engineering, the stress from important interviews can be overwhelming.

    Imagine this scenario  *

    For the duration of a 1-hour interview, you have one chance to make it or break it with them.You’ve just been offered an interview with your dream ompany. This isn’t just some random joe-schmo business you found on Craiglist, but the one you’ve pored everything you have into getting this interview. Countless hours of researching exactly what to ask, what to say and how to get an interview. Now the time has come and you’re interview is tomorrow.

    There is a lot riding on this. Needless to say, you’re a little nervous. 

    The good news? 

    You can use body language tactics to project calmness and confidence internally and externally. These tactics, taken directly from from a Harvard social psychologist and FBI agent with 25 years experience, make you feel more confident on the inside, which in turn radiate outward to your interviewer. In other words, your body can trick your mind.

    Before the Interview *

    Let’s say your interview is at 2pm and you show up 10 minutes early. When you arrive ask the secretary if she can show you where the restroom is located. Take 3 minutes in the restroom, ideally in a private stall, while she notifies the hiring manager you’ve arrived. Set the timer on your phone and implement this 3 minute confidence booster:

    1. Smile for 30 seconds
    2. Do the superwoman for 2.5 minutes
    1. Smile *

    Dale Carnegie, notorious communication expert, once talked about the power of smiling, either forced or genuine, in his book How to Win Friends and Influence People: 

    You don’t feel like smiling? Then what? Two things. First, force yourself to smile. If you are alone, force yourself to whistle or hum a tune or sing. Act as if you were already happy, and that will tend to make you happy. Here is the way the psychologist and philosopher William James put it: “Action seems to follow feeling, but really action and feeling go together; and by regulating the action, which is under the more direct control of the will, we can indirectly regulate the feeling, which is not.”

    So if you’re feeling nervous and can’t genuinely smile, force it. It will still work. Hold your teeth together and pull your cheeks back into a forced smile for 30 seconds. It was proven in the Journal of Psychological Science that even the most forced of smiles can genuinely decrease your stress and make you happier.

    2. Do the superwoman/SUPERMAN *

    Social Psychologist Amy Cuddy ran a study, which turned into one of the most-watched TED talks ever, showing how “power posing” can significantly boost your confidence and decrease stress. Power posing raises testosterone levels (i.e. increases confidence) and lowers cortisol levels (i.e. reduces stress), allowing you feel more powerful, even if you really don’t feel powerful inside initially. 

    It’s scientifically proven your body can control your mind.

    She defines this power-pose as the “superwoman pose, ” but also includes samples of a female political leader and, of course, Beyonce:

    Simply spread your legs shoulder-width apart, place your hands on your hips, keep your chin up and look straight ahead. Do this for 2.5 minutes and you’ll feel (oddly) much more powerful. It’s odd that this actually works, as I’ve tried it, so feel free to stand up and give it a test run.

    This position is proven to lower your cortisol and increase your testosterone, making you feel more confident and calm.

    During the Interview *

    Now that you’re happy, calm and confident on the inside, you’ll want to project that confidence on the outside. Here are a few neat tricks to not only display confidence to your interviewer, but allow you to feel more confident inside, just like the previous exercise. 

    The body can control the mind. *

    1. Steeple your hands *

    Hand steepling, when you spread your fingertips, pressing them together in a prayer-like gesture, is a very high-confidence display of the hands. It signifies you’re confident in your thoughts and dedicated to your point of view. Individuals in high-authority positions, including Donald Trump, use hand steepling to show dominance.

    2. Keep your thumbs up *

    Thumbs up or down is another gesture indicative of high confidence versus low confidence. So should you give an awkward thumbs up after you tell a positive story from your previous job? Or scream, “ARE YOU NOT ENTERTAINED?!?!” with thumbs up after answering an interview question? Not exactly. To project confidence and calm, keep your thumbs up, with fingers interlaced. This is a body language sign, frequented by authoritative people such as Vladimir Putin, that you are confident in your thoughts. Best used while illustrating a point in a story.

    3. Feet pointed toward the interviewer *

    The feet, believe it or not, are the most honest part of your body. Not your eyes, not your mouth, not your hands… your feet. Why? Because they’re the most reactive to your limbic brain. Your brain is separated into three parts:

    1. Reptilian (or stem) – controls basic intuition like eating, drinking fluids, reproduction, peeing, sleep, etc
    2. Mammalian (or limbic) – reacts to subconscious thoughts and emotions; the “honest” part of your brain
    3. Neocortex (or human) – critical thought, allows us to develop software, fly to the moon and cook a gourmet meal

    It’s critical to understand your brain controls all behaviors; whether going to the bathroom (reptilian), covering your ears when you hear a loud noise (mammalian), or hacking your Linkedin profile to get more endorsements (neocortex). 

    Critical thought separates the mammalian brain from the neocortex. For example, a suicide bomber may sweat profusely while being interrogated by a customs officer, because of the Mammalian brain, yet the neocortex allows him to lie with a straight face. Your limbic brain controls physiological functions, such as sweating or heavy breathing when scared, while your neocortex controls the ability to deceive and lie, pretending you’re not afraid or nervous. 

    Similarly, when people are introduced, their feet naturally don’t face each other. One foot usually faces the person, while the other points in another direction. Or if they’re very uncomfortable, both feet are facing away from the person, while their torso and eyes face toward the person. Try observing this when you see people meet for the first time. More than likely, their feet won’t be facing each other.

    Thus, when you face someone completely, both feet pointed toward them, it projects confidence and openness.

    4. Sit up straight, shoulders back, lean in *

    When you sit up straight and open up your chest, thus pulling your shoulders back, it’s scientifically proven to raise your confidence, proven by a study conducted by Amy Cuddy at Harvard. They separated people into two groups – those sitting in a dominant positions (i.e. sitting up straight) against those sitting with poor posture (i.e. slouching), then let them gamble. People placed in a dominant position were 45% more likely to make a riskier bet. By sitting up straight, you’ll naturally be more likely to take risks, due to your increased testosterone and confidence.

    Similarly, when asked a question, lean in toward your interviewer. This shows you’re listening closely to the question, are comfortable with the interviewer and conveys engagement. The process of leaning in is a subset of ventral fronting, where your torso faces the direction you favor. This is the opposite of ventral denial, where you turn away from something you don’t like. This is why we slightly turn to the side when someone approaches us at a party we don’t like and lean in toward those we’re interested in.

    Thus, show your interviewer you are comfortable with them by sitting up straight, keeping your shoulders back and leaning in.

    Body language to avoid *

    Now that we’ve covered body language tricks to convey during the interview, these are 5 critical body language tips you should avoid.

    1. Neck or face touching *

    Neck or face touching is the adult equivalent of toddlers sucking their thumb. When wanting to feel comfortable, adults assume pacifying behaviors – such as neck or face touching. Pacifying behaviors are the limbic brains response when we experience something unpleasant.

    They all accomplish the same thing – the brain requires the body to stimulate nerve endings, releasing calming endorphins in the brain, so that the brain can be soothed. These stroking behaviors when asked a difficult interview question don’t help us solve problems, rather, they help us remain calm while we do.

    Men touch their faces. Women touch their necks, clothing, jewelry, arms and hair. Neck touching is arguably the most powerful and universal pacifying behavior. This demonstrates insecurity and limited confidence. Here are some examples: In other words, keep your hands off your face and neck!

    2. Leg cleansing *

    Leg cleansing is another pacifying behavior, where you rub down from upper quad to knees, with knees and feet close together. This gesture accomplishes two things at once – it dries sweaty palms and pacifies through tactile rubbing. Similar to touching your face, rubbing your hands down your legs is a pacifying behavior that displays anxiety. Don’t do it.

    3. Interlocking your ankles *

    Locking your feet suddenly after being asked a tough question may suggest discomfort or insecurity. Interlocking the ankles is the limbic brains response to the “freeze, fight or flight” intuition to threats. When your uncomfortable with a question or situation, you naturally lock your ankles together in a “freeze” position. Again, the feet are the most “honest” part of the body, so when people are comfortable, they tend to unlock their ankles.

    4. Crossing your arms *

    When it’s socially unacceptable to lean away or distance ourselves from something we dislike, we subconsciously cross our arms. It’s the limbic brain’s response to “blocking” individuals away from you. Unfortunately, it also shows insecurity and anxiousness to your interviewer when asked a tough question. Think of when you’re in public. You often cross your arms while in line somewhere or waiting at a crosswalk. However, you’ll rarely sit this way while waiting around the house or watching TV. Why? Because you’re never uncomfortable merely sitting around your house.

    5. Pressing lips together *

    When we press our lips together, to the point they almost seem to disappear, the limbic brain is telling you to not let anything inside your body, because you’re so consumed with a stressful situation. Pressing your lips together, also known as lip compression, is a very clear sign someone is troubled or something is wrong. Such as congressman Anthony Weiner caught doing something he shouldn’t have:

    Tricks? Or internal belief? *

    Although these body language tactics can influence your interviewer, they should truly be used to influence only one person – you.

    Implementing these tactics will allow you to not only portray confidence on the outside, but feel more confident on the inside. Control your body, control your mind. Because internal confidence is what separates a good interview, from a great one.

     

    Careers job 5 Ways To Get Ahead When Your Job 8217 s At Risk
    5 Ways To Get Ahead When Your Job’s At Risk

    Being told your job is under review and that there’s a possibility of redundancy is like a dagger to the chest. Years of loyal service, late nights and early mornings only to be told, ‘we probably won’t need you anymore’! It’s like a Shakespearian betrayal. Okay, maybe not quite a Shakespearian betrayal… at least there will be some kind of compensation package to soften the blow. However, once you’ve accepted that your job is on the line, it’s important to be proactive.

    Individuals who are the least proactive and unprepared, both practically and mentally, are the ones who suffer the most. For this reason I have developed 5 smart strategies. If redundancy does take place, you’ll already be in a position to move in to a new job and importantly a job which meets your professional ambition and fulfils your financial expectations.

    1. Understand your CV *

    Do this to see the type of response you receive. Are recruitment agencies contacting you? How many jobs are you applying for before you are invited to interview? This will give you a clearer idea of market conditions. If you find that the response isn’t reflective of your expectations, which from my experience is usually the case, you can use that period to improve your CV/Résumé ahead of time. By having a better understanding of the market and already having an effective CV/Résumé will put you one step ahead of the competition.

    2. Assess your own job *

    Think about where you see yourself in the next 5 years, and whether realistically you will be able to achieve that target within your current organisation. This applies especially if you’ve been at the company for a short time and you know that your redundancy package is going to be an insignificant amount. Therefore if you receive a job offer, you can accept it knowing that it’s a job you want and for a company that can progress your career.

    3. Set boundaries *

    Due to financial circumstances many people are forced in to accepting a job that they wouldn’t normally consider. Despite providing the stability needed in the short term, it can sometimes have a detrimental impact on your long term career progression. The realities of this situation only come to light once you’re in the job and the anxiety of how you’re going to pay the bills are no longer an issue. By having a clearer understanding of market conditions and the types of jobs you are willing and unwilling to do will give you greater control of the process. This will allow you to make more informed decisions. Furthermore, make it clear to recruitment agencies the type of positions you are looking for.

    4. Focus on your network *

    If you’re not on LinkedIn; sign up and start increasing your network. Focus on connecting with people that could potentially be valuable when it comes to hitting the job market, such as HR Managers & other advisors, and potential line managers. So if you are told that you’re going to be made redundant, you already have a wide network of people that you can contact instantly about possible opportunities.

    5. Attend interviews *

    Whether you want the job or not, you have to remember that interview questions are a two way process and there is no compulsion for you to take the job (just like there is no compulsion them to offer you the job). This is a great way to familiarise yourself with the interviews process, as well as polishing your interview skills. If you find that your interview performances are not reflective of your true ability, than I would recommend getting some professional help.

    Being proactive is the key and by following these 5 simple strategies, you can confront the possibility of redundancy head on and most importantly come out of the other side stronger and better!

    “A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity, an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty”- Winston Churchill

    How to resume sq 1 1 7 Tips For Writing A Killer Resume
    7 Tips For Writing A Killer Resume

    When you’re looking for a job and writing a resume to help you land that dream position, you should not just be asking “How do I write a resume?” You should be asking “How do I write a great resume?” Or, “How do I write a resume that stands out—and stands out for the right reasons?” To get an interview, and to get a job offer, you need to get the attention of a hiring manager or recruiter.

    As a hiring manager, I review thousands of resumes a month. There are certain things I look for in a resume that make me pay closer attention, and encourage me to learn more about an applicant’s experience rather than just set it aside and move on to the next one. If you’re struggling with getting a callback, you should consider incorporating some of these elements when you’re writing your resume. These seven secrets of an effective resume that I share below will help you write an effective resume and get your resume to the top of the stack every time.

    1. Keywords, Keywords, Keywords. *

    Just like location, location, location in real estate, keywords and key phrases are the base for any great resume and they are how you can create a resume that will get you noticed. This is especially important for an online resume. To use keywords to create your effective resume, start by picking job-specific keywords that are relevant to your prior work experience, achievements, and career goals. When a hiring manager or recruiter does a search in their candidate database or on a job board, the keywords they search for need to be in your resume. Personality descriptors and vague soft skills are not what a recruiter or potential employer searches by. Examples of these words that you should leave out are: effective communicator, self-motivated, amiable. Better keywords to use when writing your resume are technical skills and actual position titles like: cost accountant, contract negotiation, and profit and loss management.

    2. Tailor your resume to the position you are trying to pursue. *

    On the work history section of your resume don’t list all your duties at your previous job. This is a common resume mistake—too many job seekers create a resume that tries to impress an employer by saying “look at all the responsibilities I had!” They don’t care about the ones that won’t help them. Instead, for an effective resume, list the duties from your work experience that are MOST APPLICABLE to the position you are trying to obtain. These are your actual qualifications for the position, and this is what an employer cares about. Even better is to choose accomplishments and contributions that are related and list those as well. Which brings me to my next point.

    3. List accomplishments and contributions, not just duties. *

    Employers want to see what you can do for them, what value-added service or skill set you are going to bring to the table. When I review a resume, I want to know what you actually accomplished at your last job and how that translates into what my company needs. Pick accomplishments that are specific to the job you are trying to get. To help you write a resume that specifically addresses a company’s needs, look beyond the job description to the company’s website or LinkedIn page to learn more about their culture, goals, and mission. An effective resume is as much about the company you are trying to impress as it is about you.

    4. Market your knowledge, skills, and abilities. *

    Resume writing is marketing. I always tell my clients the first one-third of their resume is the most important. If the top third of the page catches my eye, then I will take the time to read the rest. You can make your resume stand out by creating a powerful career summary at the top and then adding a core strengths section right underneath.

    5. Create a powerful introductory summary statement. *

    Your introductory statement needs to be related to the position you want to obtain, sell your best attributes, and be POWERFUL. When I read an introductory statement I’m looking for that WOW factor. I want it to grab my attention, tell me you’re the best candidate for my position, and make me want to read the rest of your resume. Don’t make it just a resume objective statement—in case I haven’t been clear enough already, you need to address what the employer wants and needs, not just what you want from them.

    6. Highlight your strengths in a core knowledge section.

    This is a great place for keywords. Use industry-specific keywords in this section. If you put your keywords here and disperse them throughout the resume, your chances of getting through an applicant tracking system—or being first to show in a potential employer’s search on a job board—dramatically increases.

    7. Create an eye-catching resume. *

    With the tools available in even basic programs like Microsoft Word, there’s no reason for you to not have a modern resume that is visually appealing. Formatting matters and you need to design your resume layout to be reader-friendly and attention-grabbing. Pick an easy-to-read font, and use plenty of white space. Don’t try to cram everything into a one-page resume. A two-page resume is perfectly appropriate, and expected even, especially if it is an executive resume. If hiring managers open your resume and it is a crowded, jumbled mess they are not going to spend more of their time searching through it to find the information they need. A messy resume will likely be the end of my interest in hiring you. However, if your resume format, style, and layout are attractive and easy to read I will be more inclined to read through the rest of the document and learn about your work experience, achievements, and skill set.

    Are you tired of your resume being rejected by applicant tracking systems? I know how frustrating it is to submit your resume and receive no response. I hate seeing qualified people never break through the screening process. It shouldn’t be that way. That’s why our local Labour Hire Consultants offer a Resume Review Service so you can start seeing better resume response rates! Just contact us to find out more.

    Interview sq 1 Jobseeker Tips 8211 More Employable Common Interview Question Responses
    Jobseeker Tips – More Employable Common Interview Question Responses

    BACK TO BASICS: HOW TO MAKE YOURSELF MORE EMPLOYABLE

    When you are looking for employment one of the best ways to ensure that you get the job you seek is to actively work towards making yourself more employable. Nailing Common Interview Questions is a great place to start.

    This involves a variety of things; some of them are easy while others take some time and effort. These are things that make you more desirable by an employer, and help you to stand out from the competition. Some people will have these qualities already, and others must work to get a few or all of them.

    Skills

    Make sure that you have all of the skills that are needed for you to apply for a specific job. Carpenters, welders, equipment operators, cement finishers and other trades all have specialist skills that are required. Make sure your skills and qualifications match the requirements

    Experience

    It can be a bit of a catch-22 where you need more experience to secure employment in a better job, but you can’t get that experience without working on the job. So what can you do?

    Try volunteering your time with a company on the understanding that you will be gaining much needed experience. They may even pay you a portion of what those with experience are earning, or the voluntary work may lead into aid work with that company.

    Attitude

    A positive attitude is one of the best things that you can have. Make sure that you put a positive spin on your answer to the questions asked of you in an interview. If you are not sure how you can do this, it is a good idea to practice with a friend to see how you might answer certain questions.

    A potential employer is more likely to remember a person who has a positive outlook.

    Here is an excellent list of common interview questions:https://www.forbes.com/sites/jacquelynsmith/2013/01/11/how-to-ace-the-50-most-common-interview-questions/

    Resume (CV)

    Make sure your resume (CV) is up to date with important relevant work experience and/or volunteer positions. Employers want to see that you have either worked in the field or you have been attempting to get your name out in the field among those employers who will be looking for your particular skill set.

    Use a professional format for your resume with a list of education, work experience and relative skills. If you are not sure about what that looks like, look at examples of resumes online until you see a format that catches your eye.

    For Job Seekers

    Labour Hire firms like Complete Staff Solutions make the process of finding work easy: one interview with us so we can learn all about your skills and past experience and no fuss.

    After seeing us we will be actively looking for work for you that match your skills, experience and the types of work that you prefer doing, or you can find a specific job with us that appeals to you and apply

    Look for jobs here: https://www.completestaff.com.au/employee-services/available-jobs-looking-for-work

    Jobs Jobseeker Tips 8211 Find A Job
    Jobseeker Tips – Find A Job

    NEED TO FIND JOB? TOP TIPS FOR JOB SEEKERS *

    Looking for an Available Job? Labour Hire Agencies are likely your key!!! Whether you are a seasoned worker looking for a career change or trying to find a job for the first time, there are a number of things you can do to improve your prospects. Read on to find out how to put your best foot forward in your search for employment!

    Know your industry *

    In today’s competitive workplace, it’s important to know exactly what a potential employer is looking for when hiring so that you can stand out among the other job seekers. What skills are they looking for, for example? Are your skills current and up to date or could it be wise to do a refresher course? Courses through registered training organisations are always looked upon favorably, and can be a great way for those entering a new industry to gain practical experience so they are ready to hit the ground running in a new placement. Of course, some trades involve specific on the job training instead, which is why it’s so important to do your research before putting in an application.

    For Job Seekers

    A resume for success *

    When you are job searching, first impressions count. Your resume, and accompanying cover letter, will be your introduction to any potential employer and it’s imperative to get it right. A poorly edited resume tells your potential employer that you lack attention to detail. You may consider using a professional resume company, or simply ask someone to proofread your work for you before submission. Good spelling and grammar, along with a clear, readable format are a great start.

    If you are required to address selection criteria, make sure it is specific to the job. A generic resume handed out to multiple businesses is not going to impress your future employer. They want to hear why you are the perfect candidate for the specific position advertised, and how your skills match what they are looking for in an employee.

    Importantly, be genuine. Consider what traits make you an asset to your current position and how they can be utilised in your new role.

    Register Online

    Applying for jobs *

    There is a multitude of platforms available to assist you in your search to find a job. Newspapers, community boards, online job seeker websites, and even social media groups advertise regularly for a range of different industries on behalf of businesses.

    Another avenue to consider is a labour hire services company. Specialising in both short and long term employment solutions, the labour hire firm employs people who are looking for work directly and sends them out on regular assignments with clients looking for a trained worker to fill an employment vacancy. The benefits for job seekers is regular work in a variety of industries, with training, wages, insurance, and support offered by the labour company rather than the business.

    If you’re trying to find a job, you need to put your best foot forward by researching your industry, keeping your skills current, and utilising the services of professionals to help you move forward to your dream career!

    Like this post? Share it on Facebook! Refer to a friend who registers and get a Free RESUME review.

    Resume interview 5 Ways To Simplify A Long Cv While Maintaining Sophistication And Nuance
    5 Ways To Simplify A Long Cv While Maintaining Sophistication And Nuance

    Confession time: recruitment is as much about quantity as it is about quality, and most recruiters work in a permanent state of overdrive to hit volume and placement targets.

    As a result, successful recruiters are efficient recruiters: those who are able to quickly get through the huge stack of CVs sitting on their desks.

    What does this mean for you? There’s no surer way to make a recruiter run screaming in the other direction than to hand over a multi-page monstrosity of a CV.

    If your CV is more than 4 pages long or doesn’t follow a simple, easy-to-read format, you’d be well served by taking some time to simplify. The good news is: simple doesn’t equal plain, and it’s possible to have a sophisticated and nuanced CV without causing recruiters’ eyes to glaze over, beginning with these 5 strategies.

    1. Use Grouping to your Advantage.

    While reverse chronological CVs are certainly the most common – and preferred – CV style, you shouldn’t be afraid to tweak this tried and true format if you have a legitimate reason.

    Professionals with significant project experience, consultants or sole traders with multiple clients, and people who’ve switched positions frequently within the same company are most likely to benefit from this technique, as it allows for a succinct summary of multiple roles.

    The trick is to group responsibilities together whilst still highlighting individual projects and accomplishments.

    My team does this by describing role mandates and common responsibilities in 5 or 6 bullet points, and creating a ‘Key Engagements’ or ‘Projects’ section with 1 to 2 bullet points per project to describe your role and highlight results.

    1. Use the Russian Doll Approach.

    I swear by this approach, because it allows me to subtly direct the readers’ attention to the most important experience, which is typically also the most recent.*

    Think of your current role as the largest in a set of nesting Russian matryoshka dolls: because it’s the most important, it should take up the most amount of space – around 5 to 7 ‘responsibilities’ bullet points and 3 to 5 ‘accomplishments’ bullet points.

    As you move further back in your career history, imagine each role as a smaller doll, and give it less space on the page. This will keep the overall length in check, while allowing you to give the most important information the detailed approach it deserves.

    *Of course, this approach only works if your most recent experience is indeed the most relevant.

    1. Master the Mandate.

    If I’m honest, most long and complex CVs don’t have to be; the writer simply didn’t do a great job at presenting the information briefly.

    Considering you only have 6 seconds to capture a recruiters’ attention, its crucial you make the time you have count. That means putting the most important information for each role up-front, so even recruiters that stop reading past the first bullet point get a good idea of what you did.

    Make the first bullet point for each role a ‘super bullet’ that includes:

    1. a high-level overview of the role,
    2. the mandate,
    3. and the main target.

    Here’s an example: Divisional leadership role [overview] driving market expansion across 5 APAC markets[mandate] to turn around financial performance and restore divisional profitability [target].

    1. What-Why Writing.

    Many people have difficulty summarizing a role using less than 10 bullet points, and as a result, role descriptions spiral out of control and take up way more space than they need to.

    The solution is to create fewer, but more complex, bullet points, using What-Why writing.

    For each ‘responsibility’ bullet point, express what you did, leading with an action verb, and why you did it, showing the positive impact your actions had.

    For example: Forged cross-functional partnerships with senior client stakeholders (what) to identify business requirements and ensure the project plan aligned with organizational priorities (why).

    1. Be Selective.

    It always baffles me when clients list every job and short course they’ve ever completed on their CV.

    It’s hugely distracting, and often has the opposite effect to that intended, detracting from the experience and qualifications you really want the recruiter to notice, or making you look unfocused or out-of-touch.

    While deleting irrelevant qualifications and experience is a must, sometimes it’s not enough. If that’s the case, use grouping and formatting to your advantage:

    • Create a ‘Selected Qualifications’ section on the first page to draw attention to 3 or 4 of your most impressive credentials. Move all other relevant qualifications to an ‘Additional Qualifications’ section on the back page.
    • Group similar qualifications together rather than listing them out separately:
      • Australian Marketing Institute Short Courses: Public Relations Writing Tactics (2015), Event Promotions & Sponsorship (2013), Social Media Marketing (2012).
    • List your most recent career experience in a ‘Professional Summary’ section on the first page, providing details for each role in the ‘Career Experience’ section. Create an ‘Additional Experience’ section to list, but not detail, roles prior to the past 10 years.

    Before you hit “SEND” on a job application, ask yourself if the recruiter has to go digging for the good stuff. If they require a Rosetta stone to decipher your CV, chances are they’ll move on to the next candidate.

    Remember that the best CVs are both sophisticated and easy to read. Do yourself a favor and take a few hours to simplify – in a smart way – and enjoy the results.

    Cover Letter sq 300x200 1 How To Write An Honest Cover Letter To Avoid The Wrong Job
    How To Write An Honest Cover Letter To Avoid The Wrong Job
    Your cover letter is your introduction to your entire purpose of applying for a certain job post. *

    When there’s an opening for your dream job but you’re not qualified for it yet, what should you do? A lot of people will look at the qualifications specified for the job and think of ways to embellish their actual skills and experiences to make it seem like they’re a good fit. But where’s the line between embellishment and fraud and how do you know when you’ve gone too far?

    Embellishing the qualifications on resume: *

    I know what you’re thinking: “I will work so hard and be so enthusiastic and grow into the job so quickly that they won’t even notice I’m not qualified for it.” If you do manage to fool the hiring manager and actually get your foot in the door, what’s more likely to happen is that instead of growing into the job, you’ll become overwhelmed with the daily demands that you don’t have the ability to meet.

    Instead of catapulting yourself to the top, you’ll only manage to ruin your reputation and waste everyone’s time. You could’ve spent that amount of time building your skillset and gaining the experience that would make you qualified for the dream job that has now turned into a nightmare.

    When crafting your cover letter, you should undoubtedly demonstrate your confidence and abilities. There are likely many milestones you’ve achieved throughout your career that you can be proud to display. But blatantly embellishing important skills required to fulfill a specific role is not only unprofessional, but it’s also unethical. Here’s a list of some commonly required qualifications that job-seekers lie about:

    Foreign languages: *

    If a job requires foreign language skills – as many international business companies require these days – and you don’t have those, be aware that learning a new language is not something you can easily pick up on the side while performing your job. It takes months and even years of study and dedication to reach business level fluency.

    By attempting to fake this, you’ll put yourself in a very embarrassing position when the time comes for you to actually speak Intermediate Japanese you claimed to know. Instead of lying, enroll in a class, and let them know that you’re currently studying Japanese in your cover letter.

    Also as Teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) market has boomed, many companies are looking for native speakers, usually from the UK, Canada or the US to fill their ranks. Trying to pass yourself off as a native English speaker when you aren’t just isn’t realistic.

    Technological skills: *

    The same goes for technological skills. If you aren’t tech-savvy and the job you’re looking at requires you to know how to write code when you’re barely able to operate the latest version of Microsoft Office, you’re setting yourself up for failure. Not only that but your incompetence in this area will quickly become obvious.

    Acquire the skills before applying. Take some classes and get certified. Or enroll in a class and let the employer know in your cover letter that you’re working on acquiring that skill. Maybe they’ll hire you or at least keep your resume on file for future openings.

    Managerial/leadership skills: *

    Many people embellish their job titles from previous jobs. But, there’s a huge gap between being an employee and a manager. If you’re applying for a job as a manager and have limited to no managing or leadership skills, be prepared for a lot of frustration. Managing people requires diplomacy, patience and often difficult decision-making skills. If you’re not up to the task, you won’t be able to earn the respect of your employees.

    Other lies that often show up on resumes and cover letters are education level, dates of employment, and salary. Today there are a number of services that perform professional background checks and your lies will likely be discovered. Best to tell the truth- at least then you’ll know the reason you didn’t get the job was that you weren’t qualified rather than having been caught in a lie.

    The other side of the coin is making yourself sound too desperate in your cover letter. If you’ve been out of work for a while or were recently fired, you may be vulnerable to accepting any job out there, no matter what the conditions or pay. Do you really want your workweek to include Saturdays? What about no medical insurance and unpaid vacations? Or a job that requires you to move to another state? Or a job that will start as an unpaid internship with the “possibility” of promotion to a paid position?

    Being flexible is a strength. But bending over backward for a company that doesn’t reward you adequately for your work is abuse. Display confidence in your skills in your cover letter and stick it out until the right job comes along rather than making yourself miserable in the wrong job.

    Cover letter do’s and don’ts: *
    • Do highlight skills and experiences that are relevant to the job you’re applying for. Don’t lie about skills you don’t possess or responsibilities you didn’t perform.
    • Do enroll in classes to acquire the skills required for the job and communicate that in your cover letter. Don’t say you already have a required level of skill that you don’t.
    • Do display confidence and positivity about career milestones and accomplishments. Don’t inflate job titles, salaries, or education levels.
    • Do indicate that you are flexible and interested in building a new career. Don’t settle for a job that you’re overqualified for or that doesn’t offer what you need
    Ace your interview prepare yourself Interview Tips 101 How To Ace Your Interview And Land The Job
    Interview Tips 101: How To Ace Your Interview And Land The Job?

    There are actually no interview tips that can get us a job that easily, but at least we have guide to help us land a job.

    The interview is your opportunity to make an unforgettable impression on the company you want to work for and get the job you want. Here are some interview tips and pointers that will help you make that positive impression:

    Preparation: *

    Always be fully prepared – often it is the one thing that an otherwise very competent candidate is lacking. DO YOUR HOMEWORK! Some of you are wondering what does that mean? Some tips for that include:

    • Drive to the location before the interview so that you know how to get there, where there is parking etc
    • Know the full name and title of the individual you are to meet with.
    • Learn as much as you can about the company.
    • Find out as much as you can about the interviewer and what they look for in a good candidate.
    • Know what your goals and objectives are for the future so that you can measure these against what is being offered.
    • Prepare questions that are specific to that position and that company.
    • Always be professionally dressed. Even in business casual environments a business suit is required for the interview process.
    • Arrive on time.
    • Bring hard copies of your resume. Often the interviewer will have printed it for themselves but it is always good practice to have it on hand just in case.
    • Bring a pen and a note pad in case you want to or need to make any notes
    The Interview: *

    Remember this is your opportunity to shine.

    • When greeting the interviewer make eye contact, extend a firm handshake and address your interviewer by last name.
    • The interview is your chance to bring forth your strengths and to point out areas of your expertise that are applicable to this position. If you think you might forget some of these at the time, because of nerves, then be sure to list them on your note pad and, with your interviewer’s permission, refer to them. It would be best if you could remember them in case you do not get the opportunity to refer to your notes.
    • Practice your answers; it will help in your memory.
    • If you are interested in the opportunity, indicate that to the prospective employer.
    Do’s and Don’ts: *
    • Be on time or a few minutes ahead of the scheduled time.
    • If an application is necessary; fill it out in its entirety. Nothing is more annoying to an interviewer than looking at a blank application if it is part of their process. This, ladies and gentlemen, applies equally to interviews with companies and recruitment firms.
    • Remember to smile and present yourself in an energetic and professional manner at all times.
    • Never speak negatively about past employers or peers.
    • Always maintain eye contact.
    • Ask questions that are pertinent to the position and company.
    • Point out areas that are a match between your skills and the requirements of the position.
    • Be prepared to discuss ways in which you have excelled or situations where you have demonstrated your initiative and ability to be proactive.
    • Be enthusiastic and positive.
    • Bring an original copy of your resume.
    • Always answer with a complete sentence. No “yes” or “no” answers.
    • Never smoke or chew gum in an interview.
    Questions: *
    Arrive prepared to answer questions about: *
    • Your strengths and weaknesses.
    • Why you are interested in that company.
    • What you know about the company.
    • Why they should hire you
    Arrive prepared to ask questions, such as: *
    • What would be my day to day responsibilities?
    • Then, what is the career path from this position?
    • What is the company policy on promoting from within?
    • How do I fit this role?
    Do not ask questions like: *
    • How much vacation do you offer?
    • Never initiate the salary question. Let your interviewer bring it up at the appropriate time.
    • How many sick days are offered?
    • Interview tips such as these only leave the impression that you are only interested in how this role and company will serve your needs rather than a give and take of rights, expectations and responsibilities.
    When Interviewing with a Recruiting Firm: *

    This step in the process is often underestimated and mistreated. In the current market, more than 70% of available opportunities are handled by recruitment firms. This includes permanent, contract, temporary, and project. Please remember when you have a meeting with a recruiter whatever side of your personality you choose to display is the side your recruiter will tell their client about.

    If you mistreat your recruiter by being late, not completing their internal forms, being surly and uncooperative in the interview with them or in the time you spend in their reception area they WILL NOT REFER YOUR RESUME to their client. This is not because they want to be mean to you but because you are their reputation. Give this some thought…recruiters do not manufacture anything, Their product is their customer service and YOU.

    If you, the candidate, mistreat the recruiter they can only assume you will also mistreat their client. They have worked long and hard to get that client and they will not risk sending someone in who will potentially damage that relationship.

    Jobs Jobsearch Australia 8 Ways To Measure Job Search Success
    Jobsearch Australia 8 Ways To Measure Job Search Success

    Whether you’ve been job searching for one month or over nine months, now is the time to diagnose what’s working and what isn’t working in your job search. As the saying goes, if your phone isn’t ringing, what you are doing isn’t working.

    Jobsearch Australia 8 Ways To Measure Job Search Success The ultimate measure of your success in a job search is a job offer. However, in order to reach this goal, you have to take the right actions and track your outcomes. It’s hard to know how to adjust your job search if you don’t know what works for you. So why aren’t you landing a job when you’ve been applying to hundreds of them online?

    Try asking yourself these questions and begin tracking your job search metrics.

    Where are you finding job leads? Job boards seem the most likely spot to find job leads, but by the time a job is posted on a job board, it has been circulating inside the company. Internal candidates have thrown their resumes in the pile and employees have been telling friends and family about the job. If you only use job boards, you’re arriving in the party too late. To proactively search for a job, create a list of 20 or more potential employers. These are companies who hire for the types of jobs you are interested in. Use your list and monitor the company career pages for similar jobs.

    How many jobs did you apply to? Sending the same resume and generic cover letter to job postings is so 1980s. Your job search strategy is going to require planning and communicating a clear and customized message for every job or company you are interested in. It is a blend of quantity and quality which means you will need to develop a system for personalizing each and every application.

    How many jobs did you think you would be a great fit for? Employers are selecting the best candidates, meaning candidates that match most of the job requirements. Do you? A general rule of thumb is to apply when you meet more than 60 percent of the requirements.

    Did you follow up after you applied? When you made follow up calls, did you make contact with a live person or did you just leave a voicemail message? Or did you take the easy route and send an email? You want to make the extra effort and do everything possible to make live contact with the hiring manager, not human resources. The hiring manager has the power to hire you, so you want your qualifications and interest to come across.

    How many people do you know inside your target companies? Referred candidates are far more likely to receive an interview and are also more likely to receive a job offer. You want to be the first one to know about a new job opportunity. Company insiders can provide you with this intelligence. The more people you know inside companies you want to work for, the more likely you can submit your qualifications early when there isn’t as much competition. This is why networking is so important. When you find a job you are interested in, reach out to everyone in your network and ask if they know anyone who works at that company. But it isn’t uncommon to find you don’t know anyone. Don’t give up. Use LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook to find a contact to reach out to.

    How many new people did you meet last week? It would be great if you knew everyone you needed to. But the truth is, you need to meet new people every week and expand your network. Focus your attention and effort in meeting people who work inside your target companies. Keep in mind, you’ll have better success doing this if you use a common connection to help facilitate the introduction. Once you’ve met someone, always follow up with a thank you message. Another way to meet new people is to attend professional association meetings, conferences or meetups. And remember to stay in touch.

    How many people did you re-connect with last week? Your network requires attention. In order to sustain the relationships you’ve made, both in the past and recently, you want to keep in touch with past colleagues and people you’ve met. Develop a system for reaching out every one to two months with people in your network, especially those inside target companies.

    How many phone screening calls have you had as a result of submitting for a job? Not every application will convert into a phone screen. However, if no one is calling and you’ve applied to many jobs, the problem is with your resume. Make sure you address as many of the job requirements as truthfully possible.

    At Complete Staff Solution’s our Recruitment Specialists are not only local but we all take a genuine interest in your physical and mental fit for our client, securing you years of comfort and success in your new role.

    Register here 300x266 Jobsearch Australia 8 Ways To Measure Job Search Success

    Cover letter resuime sq 300x300 1 The Do 8217 s And Don 8217 ts To An Effective Cv
    The Do’s And Don’ts To An Effective Cv

    You see the perfect job, know you can do it, apply and anxiously await feedback. In the back of your mind you are thinking what do we look for?

    I thought I would take some time to guide you through what a successful CV looks like from an internal recruitment perspective and give you tips and hints for success when applying directly.

    Your CV is one part of the recruitment process that is entirely in your control. Get it right and you significantly increase your chances of being selected for interview. Get it wrong and you run the risk of your application being overlooked.

    Section 1 – Header *

    No CV should be more than three sides of A4. It should be a synopsis of your suitability for the role in question, not a full itemization of your career history – and its presentation speaks volumes about your communication skills.

    Make it as concise and compelling as possible, starting with the header. Save space elsewhere by putting your personal and contact details here and leaving out extraneous details such as date of birth, marital status or any photos.

    Section 2 – Personal Statement *

    Your CV is your selling document. Open your pitch with your personal profile – a short paragraph that captures your key skills, core offer and career aspirations. This needn’t be more than 50 words – it should pithily sum up what makes you the ideal person for the job.

    Section 3 – Career History *

    Give this section the attention it deserves. As the showcase for your relevant experience, it’s undoubtedly the most important part of your CV.

    List your jobs in reverse order, starting with the most recent and giving basic details for each: company name; dates; job title. Write a quick summary of the role, followed by bullet points of your core activities and key achievements. If you have a lot of experience, stick to more recent jobs and projects.

    Your summary shouldn’t read like a job description. Provide context by focusing on the tangible results of your work. For example, rather than ‘responsible for implementing SaaS project’, say ‘successfully implemented SaaS project on time, to budget, with excellent client rating and projected revenue increases of 15%’.

    Use key phrases that will resonate with the reviewer (‘design’, ‘architecture’, ‘stakeholder management’ etc.) and clear, directive action words (e.g. ‘implemented’, ‘achieved’, ‘directed’, ‘recommended’).

    Section 4 – Qualifications *

    List your degree, professional qualifications and relevant technology certifications in reverse chronological order. There’s no need to include every single technology you’ve worked with; only the ones relevant to the job you’re applying for.

    CV Dos and Don’ts time! *

    Do: *
    • Consider using the structure outlined above
    • Keep it concise – realistically, you only have 60 seconds to impress!
    • Keep it simple and easy to read
    • Organize it well – keep sentences short and use bullet points
    • Make it relevant – it should only include information pertinent to the job you’re applying for
    • Go into more detail about recent roles (summarize key tasks for older jobs and only elaborate if it’s relevant)
    • Use facts not opinions to describe your achievements – ‘consultancy revenues rose by 20%’ says far more than ‘highly successful consultant’
    • Detail your personal input into team accomplishments
    • Explain any gaps in your work history
    • Be honest and accurate – our recruiters need to verify the information you give to progress your application, so any anomalies will be picked up
    • Review your CV at least twice before you send it – critically assess whether it best reflects your suitability for the role, scour it for mistakes and if possible ask someone else to proofread it too.
    Don’t: *
    • Go over three sides of A4
    • Use humor or attention-grabbing gimmicks
    • Include photos or pictures
    • Over-complicate things – with so little time to make an impression, it’s far better to use plain English and a clear format
    • Repeat yourself
    • Use the word ‘I’ any more than is necessary – you’d be surprised how easily a single letter can dominate a document
    • Make your career summary read like a series of job descriptions – keep the focus on your achievements within each role
    • Understate your case – this is the place to take full credit for your achievements
    • Include hobbies or interests – you’re just wasting precious space
    • Submit your CV until you are 100% convinced it doesn’t contain any spelling or grammar errors
    Cover Letters2 sq 1 Does Your Employer Actually Read A Cover Letter
    Does Your Employer Actually Read A Cover Letter?

    So, does an employer actually read a cover letter? *

    In a word – yes! In fact, cover letters may actually be more important and more necessary than even the attached resume.

    Cover letters can move candidates to the front of the line if they are highly focused and highly objective. They can help a recruiter or employer see why it is that you contacted their organization. This also helps what you are looking for (not to mention how you can help the company itself!).

    Cover letter, then, is important to have. You just have to make sure that you understand how and why employers read them. With that, then, it’s critical that you create the perfect cover letter than an employer will be happy and glad to read, as they make sure they are getting the most out of your contact while they try to fill out their job descriptions.

    Here’s the rundown on writing a cover letter that employers will love:

    Cover letter need to be tight and focused: *

    First and foremost, make sure your cover letters are incredibly tight and focused. Make it brief and short. Highlight your experience. The cover letter should tell how you can help the company. It should express what you can do to get the most out of their job description. But never forget that it should highlight your experience and the successes in the past. In turn, make sure they are no longer than several paragraphs. Definitely, it should not be longer than a single page in length!

    Link it to a specific job or opportunity: *

    Second, link the letters to a specific job or opportunity. Never send a cover letter to a company that isn’t highly focused to a direct job opportunity, and never make your cover letters aimless and worthless. Employers only have so much time to read cover letters, so it’s critical that they are brief, to the point, and highly specific.

    Make it brief and provide value: *

    When you make them brief, make sure you highlight how exactly you can provide value to the company, and how you have provided value to companies in the past. Experience is great to highlight, but connect it to providing overall value (and revenue!) to corporations, since the bottom line is what drives profits, hiring, and the growth of the business.

    Proofread, proofread, and proofread! *

    Finally, don’t make any grammatical mistakes or spelling errors! Nothing will get your cover letter thrown out quicker than a dumb grammatical mistake, or a spelling error that could have easily been corrected in time. Constantly make sure that you are double checking your cover letters – even to the point of having other people around you proofread them – so that you don’t run into stupid mistakes or other dumb problems that may lose you respect and opportunities with different companies and corporations.

    Interview prep sq 1 300x200 1 1 8 Essential Interview Tips By A Recruiter
    8 Essential Interview Tips By A Recruiter

    As a recruitment company, we feel we can offer job seekers some well needed interview tips into the mind-set of recruiters and our decision making processes. *

    We see so many worthy candidates that we have to trust our instincts when it comes to choosing the cream of the crop. So here are the interview tips to make you a stronger candidate for the job outside of your CV.

    1. Personality *

    Robots might be intriguing to watch but that doesn’t mean companies want one working for them. Someone who comes across as genuine and confident about themselves and their opinions will prove far more popular than a candidate wearing a polite mask of agreement. Building a rapport with an interviewer means that you will be more memorable, and have more chance of standing out from the crowd. And let’s face it – in a group of potential candidates, all with impressive backgrounds, the best way to get noticed is to connect with the interviewer on a more personal level.

    2. Vibe *

    That indescribable feeling that someone gives you – it can either put you at ease around them or do the opposite. Us humans make snap judgments – it’s pure instinct – so being positive, smiling and greeting the interviewer confidently can help them feel positive about you in return.

    3. Sociability *

    Long office hours and working as part of a team requires the ability to interact well with a number of different people. As biased as it might be, the recruiter will want someone who fits in with the team on more than just a work level. Companies are increasingly focusing on the culture and community of the work place. Usually, the most efficient employees are those happy employees.

    4. Natural ability *

    If you are able to pick things up quickly this will lessen the amount of hand-holding needed in training – a huge benefit for companies. These days, employers are particularly worried about graduates; their lack of real work experience can mean they take more time to adapt to a work environment. Unless it’s a job that comes with training, companies will want a smooth change over between employees.

    5. Appearance *

    A well-groomed appearance shows you understand the level of dress that’s generally expected in professional environments. Heed the saying ‘it is better to be over dressed than under dressed’. At the same time don’t let worrying about your outfit make you late for the actual interview – aim to arrive 10-15 minutes before the scheduled time.

    6. Body language *

    Recruiters register body language – crossing your legs or arms might be a subconscious move, but remember to check yourself every once in a while and think about how your body language might be coming across. And yes, constant eye contact might feel a tad awkward in a small interview room, but it looks a lot better than staring at the desk the whole time.

    7. Duration of roles *

    Websites and companies often under-rate certain aspects that recruiters will actually pay more attention to. For example, someone with 3 or 4 internships might, on paper, look better than someone with only 1 or 2. But consider the strength of each individual placement. Recruiters will note the length of time spent at each company and will get references about the candidate.

    The candidate with only 1 internship may have spent 6 months there and have a glowing reference. If the other candidate’s internships are for shorter periods of time, with only standard references, the recruiter will choose the first candidate. A recruiter is searching for a strong candidate that will take to the task immediately. He will become a fixed member of the team.

    8. Homework *

    Doing your research on the company is one of the essential interview tips! It means when they come to asking you tricky questions you can deflect them by relating it back to the company. You also use them as an example. Showing an understanding of the company and giving your own insight will tell the interviewer a great deal about your work ethic and ability. It also gives you the opportunity to ask your own questions and take control over the interview so it is not all one-sided. You can avoid making it feel more like a discussion.

    Of course, looking good on paper is imperative, especially for securing those all-important interviews. However, during the interview, it’s those little extras that help the interviewer decide which candidate to go with.

    How do we know that this process works? We follow up on each and every candidate that we’ve recommended. We wouldn’t be successful in the recruitment industry if we didn’t to put the right people forward for the right positions. For companies to confidently invest in us, we make it our business to get to know each and every candidate. All these are interview tips I can share as a recruiter.

    Why hire you Copy Interview Question How To Answer 8216 Why Should We Hire You 8217
    Interview Question How To Answer ‘Why Should We Hire You?’

    This common interview question can feel like a smack in the face. It can catch you off guard, put you on the spot and make you feel exceedingly uncomfortable. Think about why the recruiter is asking this interview question. Essentially, he is saying: “Why should we choose you over other candidates?” Or: “What do you bring to the table that other applicants do not?”

    These questions are not easy questions to answer. After all, you probably don’t know who the competing candidates are or what their qualifications are. You have to make your best guess based on current and past experiences and what you know of colleagues in your field.

    Whichever approach you use to answer this question, keep your response positive. There is no need to even mention other candidates and what you imagine their backgrounds to be. That can be a major turnoff to an employer, because you’re making assumptions, and it makes you sound negative.

    Given that, how can you move away from dumbstruck to deliver a clever response? *

    Focus on a problem you know or imagine the employer has. You only want to do this if you’re pretty certain you can help with it if you were to be hired. For example, if you know the company is trying to sell products within a new market segment – health care, for example – and you have experience in that industry, emphasize your expert knowledge of the industry, key players and that you can leverage your contacts to help them grow this part of their business.

    You can also be more general if you have trouble coming up with something that tangible. If you created a spreadsheet or database to log information at one of your jobs, and it saved colleagues a lot of time, this shows you have an ability to recognize issues and solve them.

    Beyond giving the example, tell them why you enjoy and are good at devising creative solutions to business problems. Don’t make them infer that you’d do that at their office too – tell them they would benefit from this skill!

    Describe what makes you unique. Think about what your colleagues say about you. Maybe you’re the go-to person for certain types of work or seen as an expert in a particular area. Share this information with confidence, and offer a specific example to demonstrate why you are viewed this way.

    When you give them an example, you’re showing employers how you could apply this characteristic to a similar situation in their firms. It gives them situational context rather than just a statement to go on.

    Discuss your track record. If you choose this route, you don’t want to pose as a braggart. The goal here is to relate how a specific thing you’ve done proves that you can achieve the company’s goals.

    Perhaps you’ve improved customer service levels and enabled your current company to retain and build its customer base. Tell the interviewer about this accomplishment in detail, and add that you can do the same for his company. Make sure the example you choose relates to a goal the prospective employer might have.

    Showcase your qualifications. While specific examples from the workplace are best, emphasizing qualifications can help you stand out if you are in a market where you know the qualifications they seek are lacking.

    For example, the company may have listed in the job description or stated during the interview that it prefers someone with a master’s degree for the role. Don’t just say you have a master’s and that you know it’s hard to find in this geographical area. Tell them how you’ve applied knowledge from your degree in a work setting or how you will be able to do so in this specific role. This shows you are forward-thinking and focused on contributing your knowledge to improve the company’s operations.

    Prepping for this question ahead of time will help you be less surprised when it pops up in an interview. Remember to focus on specific examples and emphasize how you’d use your background or qualifications in this new setting to help the company achieve its goals.

    Avoid comparing yourself to others, and focus on what benefits you offer. This will help keep your answer positive. You want to present yourself as a confident, motivated candidate, and the way to do that is to share what you can do, rather than what you think your competition can or cannot do. That, after all, is why they should hire you.

    Hopefully these interview tips helpful in your career.

    Job search How To Speed Up 038 Enhance Your Job Search
    How To Speed Up & Enhance Your Job Search

    Doing a job search can also be a full-time job in itself. It is time-consuming and often hard work.

    1. Know what you want before you start a job search *

    Spend some focused time working out exactly what you want to do. Self-analysis work is a key before you put your effort in. Knowing what you want and what you are good at and enjoy will save you time, ensure you come across as focused and self-assured and it will also be helpful when asking others as they will then know to think of you when a particular opportunity arises.

    1. You do a job search in a network *

    First, build your network by reaching out to relevant people within your network. Then, learn from your network. You can seek out others within your networks’ network that you could be introduced to/speak to. Ensure that you contact senior people too; they may be more likely to have hiring power. Once people are aware of your area/needs, doors should open. Speak to people who have done well in your chosen field. Most often, people who have done well in their area and enjoy it are very happy to talk to those who are equally passionate and considering entering their area. Learn from others, speak to them about how they did it or look at their bios. If you are considering a course/some development in your area of interest, get recommendations from people who know.

    1. LinkedIn *

    Use this to its full advantage in your job search. Whilst looking for a position, you could consider joining linked in premium facility which is free for the first 30 days or look into their job seeker app. LinkedIn is a hugely powerful tool when it comes to recruiting and job change – spend time on perfecting your profile. Recruiters, headhunters and decision-makers are using it to recruit so you are missing a trick if you are not using it to its full.

    1. Agencies *

    Join them. Identify three or four recognized agencies, headhunters or job search firms that recruit the types of positions that you are looking for at the correct level of seniority. A tip on finding them…. Ask your network, think of good agencies you have used in the past for recruiting and join them. Call a few of the companies you would like to work for and see if you can find out which agencies they use – then join them. Another key tip is to build a relationship with your key recruiter and their team. If they like you they will fight for you. The relationship with them is the key in a successful job search! Like Complete Staff Solutions

    1. Build your experience *

    Once you have identified what you want build your experience in that area. This could be internally within your company, by volunteering outside of work or offering on projects. Also pick out and highlight the relevant experience that you have on your CV or LinkedIn profile.

    1. Be visible *

    Whether this is in person networking or at events and conferences or ‘on line’ joining in on discussions and in groups be visible and get out there! Explore your options and choices in doing a job search.

    1. Work on preSenting yourself *

    Interview well, have an elevator pitch, look good in person and on paper. Make sure your online presence, CV and LinkedIn profiles are impressive. Spend time on this.

    1. Match *

    Be attentive and smart in doing a job search. Match your CV and LinkedIn profile as closely as you can to the job specifications that you are looking at. Pull out the key words and relevant experience that you have.

    1. Research *

    Once you have identified a position, research and do more job research. Research the company hiring process, the person interviewing you, others who work there, the market, their presence within the market, any articles related to them. Go beyond with the job search.

    1. Follow up – Ask and re ask if you need to *

    Reach out and ask others when you do a job search. Can you help them out too in some way? Don’t be afraid to ask and talk to people. Why not approach that person at that company you have always wanted to work for and send your CV. They can always say no but they may say yes!

    1. Testimonials and recommendations *

    Ask people to write these for you on LinkedIn. People generally have to be approached and asked to do this. If you can ask for a testimonials from a 360 perspective – a boss, a colleague, a client, customer etc. Have at least six.

    1. Courses *

    Are there any courses you could complete whilst you are still working at your current company or relevant ones you could do alongside?

    1. Keep up-to-date *

    Join groups on LinkedIn, sign up to blogs relevant to your field, and prescribe for an industry relevant magazine, sign up to newsletters. Go to conferences and any relevant meet ups. Learn, read and absorb any relevant information. Sign up to Google alerts. These alerts (based on single words or phrases) will generate news articles that contain them emailed directly to your in box every day and will flag newsworthy content. Perhaps sign up with three or four relevant words. Set up Google alerts for the companies you are interested in and interviewing for. All of the above will result in you coming across more knowledgeable and up to date with market changes and they may flag information on openings competitors or help you think about the specific areas you are most interested in. Read a daily newspaper to keep you informed and up to date.

    1. Keep going and try to keep positive in your job search *

    You will be more attractive as a candidate and others will want to help you. If you feel you need it and require assistance to get from where you are to where you want to be hire a career coach. Similar to asking for personal training if you have fitness goals a career coach could provide the extra support you need in your job search.

    Cover letter sq Make Your Cover Letter Grab The Employer 8217 s Attention
    Make Your Cover Letter Grab The Employer’s Attention
    So, how to make your cover letter grab your employer’s attention? *

    Companies and recruiting agencies can get thousands of responses for job openings. Under such circumstances, they will be able to give each letter a few moments to get the gist of the candidate’s proficiency, qualification and experience before moving on to the next one. If you are making a serious bid for that job, your cover letter must have that unique element to hold the recruiter’s attention and make them go through the entire content.

    How do I make my cover letter stand out? *

    Making your cover letter noticeable requires skill and creativity. Some type of customization such as a motto, creative catchphrase or a unique title can help you get noticed. There is no doubt that they are not to be used as a rule and are entirely optional. Yet, it is necessary to give these elements a try just to make your letter look exceptional and different from others.

    Where should you put your creative bits? *

    The creative tag can figure at the top of the letter so that they can catch attention immediately. It should not be mere words but must reflect your value to the organization. You can visit the website of the company to get an idea of how you can word your slogan to sync them with company’s objective. If the job is for a school teacher for instance, the slogan should reflect something about caring for students or helping them learn better. Similarly a candidate for a marketing position can have a slogan that talks about dealing with challenges, creating more closures and meeting obstacles head-on.

    What about testimonials and cover letters? *

    Testimonials are another way of getting your cover letter to be different than that of others. Testimonials can be in the form of lines from recommendation letters, vendor appreciation notes and by way of performance evaluations, memos issued to staff or other types of acclamations. When compiled creatively, they can create a powerful impact on your recruiter or interviewer. It can send a clear message to the company that they can do better by getting you on their side.

    Should you include goals and objectives? *

    If you want to make a statement about goals and objectives in your cover letter, make sure they are specific to the opening or your professional objectives. It should be able to convince the employer about your commitment and the difference it can make to your potential employers. It must amply reflect the value that your skills and talent will bring to the company.

    Bottom line to make a cover letter: *

    Cover letters are serious business. It can be a game changer in a situation where competition for a particular opening is tough. It is an identifier when talent pool available is more or less of the same standards. A great cover letter can help you get that winning edge over others and help you land that coveted job. Just remember to incorporate the above stated elements effectively and judiciously on your cover letter.

    Cover Letter Mistakes sq 1 5 Mistakes You Should Never Make On A Cover Letter
    5 Mistakes You Should Never Make On A Cover Letter

    When it comes to applying for a job your cover letter is usually the first thing most employers will see. This is your chance to say “Hi, I’m here and you should really hire me”. Any error will be the written equivalent of tripping over as you enter the room or spilling tea all over the boss.

    It says everything about you right from the start. That could be the bad as well as the good. It’s true that we can learn from our mistakes, but you really don’t want the application for the job of your dreams being the place to make them, do you? So ensure you don’t make them in the first place. Enhance your chances of being invited for an interview by making sure your initial application stage is spot on!

    Here are some of the most common – yet avoidable – cover letter mistakes that you need to guarantee you don’t make when applying for your dream job: *

    1) Getting the basics wrong: *

    You’ve sent off an application for the job you’ve been waiting for all your life, and just as you press SEND! you realize you’ve misspelled the name of the hiring manager wrong. Well it’s too late to do anything about it then. You probably won’t be hearing from that company again in all honesty.

    If you can’t be bothered to proofread your own cover letter, what does that tell a company about the kind of employee you’ll be? It’s so important to make sure all your basic details are correct and you’ve taken the time to ensure information is correct – and that doesn’t just mean running a spell check.

    Check and check again to make sure ALL of the details are correct and there are NO spelling or grammatical errors before you submit your cover letter.

    2) Being too formal in your cover letter: *

    There’s no shame in being enthusiastic about a job you want. So why should you feel you have to bottle up that enthusiasm when you are telling a prospective employer how much you want to work for them?

    Experience and qualifications are one thing. However, at this stage it’s all about getting the attention of the person who is hiring. Don’t go too heavy on the technical speak (your CV will show what you have done before). Just explain why you want the job. Tell them why you think you’re the best person for the position in the same way that you would if you were talking to someone personally.

    3) Not writing enough: *

    The secret to a great cover letter is getting the balance just right. Too long and you will lose the attention of the person writing it (they might receive hundreds of letters for just one job). Too short and it won’t say enough about you to really catch their eye. Aim for around 200-250 words maximum and pick out some of the key reasons you feel you are the ideal candidate for the job, trying to focus on one major success story you are particularly proud of. “I successfully increased revenue by 200% during my time at the company”, for example.

    If your letter is good enough then you’ll have the opportunity to tell them more about yourself at the interview stage.

    4) Using generic text in your cover letter (To Whom It May Concern): *

    Whatever you do never use these five little words to address a cover letter. And come to think of it, Dear Sir/Madam isn’t much better either.

    Do whatever you can to find out the hiring manager’s name, and address your letter to that person directly. Anything else will make you appear lazy and less than bothered if you get the job anyway.

    Don’t be afraid to pick up the phone and ask who it is that’s hiring for this position. You might get passed from pillar to post initially but remember, it’s a real person you are trying to impress here. Little details like this can make a huge difference.

    5) Not selling yourself enough: *

    One of the most common mistakes applicants make when writing a covering letter is to simply repeat what is already on your CV.

    What’s the point of that? *

    Don’t hold back. Especially when it comes to telling your potential employer why it is you want to work for them. What it is you like about the company, as well as changes you would make that might improve the business. Also, mention awards and achievements that might enhance your chances of securing an interview at the very least. This is your chance to really shout from the rooftops about what you can offer this company – so don’t sell yourself short. Never make these mistakes on your cover letter.

     

    Interview in progress Candidate May The Feedback Be With You
    Candidate, May The Feedback Be With You

    Interviewing for a new job is a stressful process; one that requires multitasking, concentration and commitment. It is also like a long and drawn-out battle; competitive and full of causalities.

    Candidates have to storm past other troopers and directly face off to hiring managers who put them through their paces, testing their suitability and stamina over a number of battle rounds. The weak ones drop off quickly; the strong ones hang on for as long as they can until one of them finally bags the role of their dreams. It really boggles my mind when applicants are invited to interview, give it their best shot and then just never hear back, so have to assume they were unsuccessful. Given how much time and effort goes into preparation and attendance, candidates shouldn’t have to accept that ‘no news is bad news’.

    Recruiters are very strapped for time, working long hours to complete a workload which can never, ever be completely ‘done’ – there is always more to do! It’s probably a bit unrealistic to expect recruiters to relay in-depth client feedback to every single applicant who’s CV they have sent to a job, but surely every candidate who is met and mentored to interview deserves to know how they’ve performed, regardless of whether they’ve been invited back.

    Are you guilty of neglecting unsuccessful interviewees? Here’s why you really need to start opening up on the feedback front:

     

    You’ll shoot yourself in the foot if you don’t *

    As a recruiter, your candidate network is everything. It’s the product you sell to your clients. If your candidates have a bad experience with you and feel you have left them in the dark, they won’t want to work with you again. Just because they weren’t right for this role, doesn’t mean they aren’t perfect for your next one, so it’s best to avoid burning bridges in your own backyard. If candidates feel frustrated and are left to wonder where they went wrong, why would they recommend you to their peers? They wouldn’t. Their colleague could be your next placement, but you won’t know because you’ll never be referred to them. The flow on effect of this is huge – if you don’t represent a diverse pool of the best candidates in the market, why would clients choose your business?

     

    Your clients will take you more seriously *

    Speaking of clients, providing feedback to candidates following an interview forces you to ask more questions of hiring managers and HR partners. Your clients will learn that you are thorough and consultative, not just a robot firing CVs into black holes. Talking to clients about feedback will also give you an opportunity to ask how the whole recruitment process is coming along t00; whether there are many others in the running from other agencies, where they are struggling and whether there have been any vital changes made to the original brief you were given.

    It goes without saying that you would let candidates know when they have been successful. Joy! Instead of just taking the good news and delivering it, asking your clients why they have been successful is important too. Your new star candidate might have areas that need improving before the next round of interviews.

     

    You’re more likely to place with a client *

    Learning the ins and outs of how your candidate interviewed, where they went wrong and where they were impressive is extremely valuable information for you. The next time you have someone interview with that client, or for that specific role, you will have a wealth of advice to offer them. Finding out that your unsuccessful candidate’s ultimate undoing was failing to answer X properly will allow you to give your next candidate the ‘heads up’ before they go in. You’ll also learn what types of personalities and personal attributes a particular client prefers from their interviewees. You’ll learn about different interview styles and techniques, too. As a recruiter, you want to equip yourself with as many tools as possible to help your candidates get roles with your clients, and knowledge is power here!

     

    You’ll sleep better at night *

    In recruitment, putting someone out of their misery is simply the right thing to do. It’s never fun to be the bearer of bad news, but you should find some comfort in the fact that it wasn’t you who rejected the candidate, you’re just the messenger (so don’t shoot). As long as you deliver the feedback in a very constructive way, you are benefiting that person by offering them ways to improve and points they can work on moving forward.

    Frustrated candidates who are being kept in the dark also tend to chase you constantly by emailing and phoning you at your desk, and can end up turning into a game of hide and seek where you don’t want to take their call. Biting the bullet and letting them know they were unsuccessful will save you time in the long run. To you they may really just represent a deal that dropped off and killed your chance at making the high achievers’ trip. However to them, you represented their dream role, their livelihood and their whole career.

    Candidates, may the feedback be with you.

    Common Cover Letter Mistakes New Job Seekers Make sq Copy Top 10 Cover Letter Tips
    Top 10 Cover Letter Tips

    We have cover letter tips for you, so you can wow interviewers and employers. The closer to perfect your letter is, the better your chances of getting the interview. When you need to write a cover letter to apply for a job, it’s sometimes the small things that can make a big difference.

    Review these tips and techniques for writing top-notch cover letters to send with your resume, including format and presentation, advice for choosing a type of cover letter, writing custom cover letters, how to send, and examples and templates.

    1. Select the Right Type of Cover Letter *

    There are several types of cover letters that can be sent to employers and contacts. Be sure to choose a type of cover letter that reflects how you are applying for the job or the type of job search assistance you are requesting.

    Your cover letter should be designed specifically for the purpose you are writing and customized for each position you seek. Review samples of each type of cover letter, and pick the one that works best for you.

    2. Try to Find a Contact Person *

    When it comes to cover letters, taking the time to get personal is really important. Find out as much as you can about the company and the hiring manager.

    Personalize your cover letter and, if you can, address it to the individual responsible for hiring. If need be, research online or make a phone call to find out who the hiring manager is.

    3. Address Your Cover Letter Correctly *

    How to address a cover letter can be tricky. Like, say, you are responding to a blind ad. You don’t have a contact person’s name to include. You don’t know the hiring manager’s gender as well. It’s best that you use gender-neutral words then.

    4. Explore Other Cover Letter Tips and Examples *

    Take the time to review cover letter examples before you start writing your own. Make sure that your letter explains how your skills relate to the criteria listed in the job posting.

    5. Format Your Cover Letter Properly *

    How you format your cover letter, both from a content (the information you include) and a presentation (what your cover letter looks like) perspective is important.

    Even when applying online or via email, your cover letter needs to be properly formatted, readable, and without any mistakes.

    6. Include Keywords in Your Cover Letter *

    It’s important to include skill, results and recognition keywords. Make sure that these match the description of the job for which you are applying and attest to your credentials in your cover letter. These cover letter tips can increase your chances of getting selected for an interview.

    7. Write a Custom Cover Letter *

    It can be time-consuming to write a custom cover letter for each job you apply for, but it’s important to take the time. Your giving effort will show the company why you are a good match. This is actually the most important cover letter tips you can have in mind.

    8. Start From a Cover Letter Template *

    A cover letter template can be a good way to get started writing cover letters to send with resumes when you apply for jobs.

    Use a cover letter template as a starting point for creating your own personalized cover letter by adding your own information to the template.

    9. Send an Email Cover Letter That Will Get Read *

    The most important part of sending an email cover letter is to follow the employer’s instructions. If the job posting says to include your cover letter and resume as an attachment, attach Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF files to your email message.

    It’s important to send your cover letter and resume attachments correctly. Make sure to include all the information you need so your email message is read. Then, let the receiver know how they can contact you to schedule an interview. Never miss this among the cover letter tips you have known so far.

    10. Explain an Employment Gap *

    Prepare to explain when you have recent gaps in your work history. You may want to share why you have been laid-off and out of work. You can also tell that you were taking time out from the workplace to spend with your family, traveling, going back to school, or for any reason. Your cover letter gives you an opportunity to explain the employment gap.

    These are just cover letter tips you can follow to be guided. But certainly, your cover letter should mainly answer what the job post requires. To satisfy what the recruiter and employer with what they are looking for, is the most important cover letter tips you note.

    Rip cover sq 300x161 1 Why The Cover Letter Is Dead
    Why The Cover Letter Is Dead

    In offering some advice today to a family member who is job hunting, I came to the realization that the cover letter is all but dead. The family member’s query was how to write a compelling/ interesting cover letter because he was looking to find ways to get his resume noticed by the hiring managers.

    His inquiry wasn’t a bad one. Because it’s true. Cover Letter seems no longer popular nowadays. *

    He wanted his resume to stand out against the rest. It’s no secret that hiring/HR managers see hundreds of resumes per opening. Only a small percentage of them ultimately get considered. So as such, candidates want their resumes to stand out and show how they are best for the position. As a result you type a letter in an attempt to set yourself apart from the other applicants.

    On top of the vast competition of applicants, there is also the resume itself. I have heard many reasons for resumes to be declined by hiring managers . Some of these are from spelling errors to poor formatting. Forget about whether you think you have the technical skills or not. The way your resume looks can determine your future employment opportunities. All of these factors result in why so many people put such a high emphasis on the cover letter.

    Candidates realize the resume is your first impression, and not the cover letter. *

    You are making an attempt at setting yourself apart and explaining why they should consider you. As such, the cover letter becomes that outlet to make that impression.

    We live in a social media world where 140 characters is the max attention our brain can offer. Consequently hiring managers would like to decide if you are a fit as quickly as possible. A study by The Ladders revealed that on average recruiters review resumes for about 6.25 seconds before determining if you are a fit. A cover letter unfortunately does not fit into this equation. While I am sure the candidate spent a good amount of time preparing what they would like to say, cover letters get skimmed over with little to no interest.

    The other issue adding to this is not personalizing cover letters. *

    Too many times I have received a cover letter that looks like it has been copied, pasted and sent to roughly 15 different jobs without personalization. Nothing shows a lack of preparation more than this.

    I have been in the recruiting industry for close to 7 years. I do not have the exact numbers, but in that time I must have submitted thousands of candidates to my client’s requirements. And although I do not have the precise stats, I do know this much; of all the candidates to get hired by my clients through me, I have never submitted one with a cover letter. I send my clients a copy of the candidates resume and put together an email that highlights their experience and how it relates to the position.

    That is what I recommend to individuals who ask for advice when job hunting. It’s not enough to simply apply for a position in today’s society. You must get direct contact to separate yourself from the herd. That is the beauty of sites such as LinkedIn. In the past the hiring manager was a mysterious figure behind a job ad. Now you can pull up a posting on LinkedIn, and not only is the poster right there for you, there are even suggestions on how you could be connected with them.

    It is on you as a candidate to find that person and reach out to them. *

    The recruiting and staffing industry is a multi-billion dollar business, because ultimately the hiring process is a personal experience. So rather than putting your effort into a cover letter, find that persons email address and put together a personalized message on why you are applying and a fit for the position. It doesn’t have to be too long, just give the person a reason to spend more than 6.25 seconds on your resume since you won’t have a cover letter.

    Job demand graph infographic 12062019 sq 1 Job Search Statistics Every Job Seeker Should Know
    Job Search Statistics Every Job Seeker Should Know

    Job Seekers could have all the skills and  experience to make you the best candidate for a role, but if you’ve made sloppy mistakes on your resume, or not taken the time to write it in a way that will get you noticed, it could cost you the job.

    Recruiters generally make up their mind about a Job Seeker within 60 seconds of glancing at their resume, so it could be something as small as a spelling error that gets your application discarded.

    So what makes a stand out resume and what are the most common mistakes that job seekers make?

    CV and Resume Statistics: *
    • Recruiters spend an average of 3.14 minutes reading a candidate’s resume and they have generally made up their mind within the first minute.
    • 1 in 5 recruiters will actually reject a candidate before they’ve even finished reading their resume.
    • 5% of applicants are dishonest when describing their previous roles or the time they spent in a job.
    • 10% of job seekers have applied for 50 or more jobs without hearing back.
    What are the top reasons that recruiters reject a Job Seekers resume? *
    • 59% of recruiters will reject a candidate because of poor grammar or a spelling error. Though these mistakes seem small, they indicate that the candidate is sloppy and hasn’t taken the time to proofread their resume.
    • Over 50% of recruiters will reject a candidate if their resume is full of cliches. You need to differentiate yourself from the crowd, cliches are boring.
    • Over 40% are also put off by too much design, such as snazzy borders, inappropriate fonts, clipart images…..or even an emoji!
    What are the top 10 resume cliches that recruiters hate? *

    “I can work independently.” – Most people can!

    “I’m a hard worker.” – Yes, aren’t we all?

    “I work well under pressure.” – Congratulations you tough cookie!

    What makes a great resume? *
    • Read through your resume at least 3 times to make sure there are NO spelling or grammar mistakes and it all reads smoothly. Get someone else to check it over too, in case you missed something and to get a second opinion.Keep your resume as professional as possible. Photosare not necessary and fancy fonts make it look slightly unprofessional. Stick to a simple font such as Calibri or Arial, use bullet points for easy scan-ability and ensure that they layout is consistent throughout. Try to keep it to a couple of pages long.
    • Ensure that your contact details are correct and up to date.
    • Tailor your resume for the job, mentioning keyword s and skills that are included in the job advert.
    • Use specific examples of achievements from each role
    Facts from Recruitment Agency Source *
    • On average, each corporate job offer attracts 250 resumes. Of those candidates, 4 to 6 will get called for an interview, and only one will get the job. (Glassdoor)
    • Recruiters take an average of six seconds to scan a resume. (TheLadders)
    • What recruiters say they look for on a resume (Jobvite Recruiter Nation Report 2016):
      • Job Experience – 67%
      • Cultural Fit – 60%
      • Cover Letters – 26%
      • Prestige of College – 21%
      • GPA – 19%
      • 62% of employers are specifically looking for your soft skills. (Careerbuilder)
    • What a list of what recruiters want to see from job seekers (Careerbuilder):
      • Resumes Tailored to the Open Position – 63%
      • Skill Sets Listed First on a Resume – 41%
      • Cover Letters – 40%
      • Application Addressed to the Hiring Manager – 22%
      • Links to Personal Blogs, Portfolios, or Websites – 16%
      • 53% of employers feel they need more than a resume to assess if someone is fit for a job. (Careerbuilder)
    • 44% of job seekers think they spend 1-5 minutes reading a job post when they spend 49.2 – 76.7 seconds reading a job post. (TheLadders)
    • Recruiters will penalize people who have pursued non-standard work or work that’s “beneath” the candidate. (American Sociological Review)
    • Not using your professional skills can hurt a resume as much as one year of unemployment. The damage is limited for those who had temp agency employment. (American Sociological Review)
    • Recruiters penalize men for part-time work but not women. (American Sociological Review)
    • 4% of resumes errors come from mistakes in former job experience descriptions. (TheLadders)
    • 6% of resume errors come from the miscommunication of skills on a resume. (TheLadders)
    • 7% of resume errors involved missing accomplishments. (TheLadders)
    • Here’s what recruiters say will get a resume rejected in 2016 (Careerbuilder):
      • Impersonal Applications (No Hiring Manager’s Name) – 84%
      • No Thank You Note After Interview – 57%
      • Resumes Aren’t Customized and Tailored – 54%
      • No Cover Letter – 45%
      • No Follow Up With Employer After Interview – 37%f
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