Interview Tips 960x460 sq 1 9 Interview Tips To Help You Impress Your Interviewer
9 Interview Tips To Help You Impress Your Interviewer

Before you apply these interview tips, you must first establish rapport and small talk. Once you master the small talk, here are some interview tips that will help you impress your interviewer.

  • Work on your handshake: *

    Don’t offer up a flimsy or sweaty hand. Instead, when you meet with prospective employers or interviews, offer a firm handshake, with one or two pumps from the elbow to the hand. It’s a good way to illustrate your confidence and start the interview off on the right note.

  • Get serious: *

    If you take a casual approach to the initial interview with a company, especially with a screening interviewer from the human resources department, you may be sealing your fate. Job seekers should treat every interview as if it’s their one and only chance to sell themselves to the recruiter.

  • Get the practice: *

    If you find yourself being offered an interview for a job you are not really interested in, go on the interview anyway; you can make contacts for future job opportunities and get valuable interview practice.

  • Be enthusiastic: *

    Bring a positive attitude to your interview. Most interviewers won’t even give a second thought to someone who has a negative presence or seems like they almost need to be talked into the job. “You’re selling yourself, and part of you is the positive approach you’ll bring to the office every morning, ” says Alison Richardson, a recruiter for several New York financial firms. “That smile and friendly demeanor go a long way.”

  • Ask questions: *

    When interviewing for a new position, it’s essential to have a handful of questions to ask your potential employer. Some questions could include: What do you consider to be the ideal background for the position? What are some of the significant challenges? What’s the most important thing I can do to help within the first 90 days of my employment? Do you have any concerns that I need to clear up in order to be the top candidate?

  • Tell a story: *

    Your interviewer wants to know about your skills and experiences, but he or she also wants to know about you. Don’t fire off routine answers to questions. Instead, work your answers into stories or anecdotes about yourself. People remember the people who are interesting. Prove your value by tailoring stories that address the main concern an interviewer may have: What can you do for us?

  • Show restraint: *

    During an interview, what you don’t say may be as important as what you do say. As a rule, don’t talk about money or benefits, especially during the first interview. You should already know if you fit the parameters. Don’t badmouth about any of your past employers. Organizations don’t hire complainers. Don’t mention outside career aspirations or part-time jobs. Employers are looking for people who want to be part of their organization for the next decade and beyond.

Whatever you do, don’t mention the need for an immediate vacation. First of all, you’re making an assumption that the recruiter wants to hire you. Second, you’re essentially removing yourself from the list of potential candidates. A job candidate we once interviewed was quick to announce that she needed time off immediately for a two-week honeymoon. We hadn’t even offered her the job. Needless to say, we didn’t. Certainly, there are scenarios in which you’ll need to discuss pending scheduling conflicts, but the interview isn’t one of them.

  • Be memorable: *

Considering the number of job seekers interviewing for positions today, it’s fair to suggest that many HR workers can hardly keep track of the differences. That’s why it’s important to do or say something that will allow you to stand out in the mind of your interviewer. This could even be one of the important interview tips you put in mind. It will strike a personal note and also provide a point of reference when it’s time to recall the top candidates. Sure, the job candidate with “American Idol” experience had no real usable background for the job we were looking for, but he was memorable.

  • Among the interview tips, don’t forget to ask for the job: *

    “Tell your interviewer you want the job — period, ” says Dana Fulbright, an IT recruiter for Universal Studios in Orlando, Fla. “So many people leave without ever saying they want to be hired. It sounds so simple, but it’s true. Let your employer know that you want to work there.”

So, good luck! Landing a job would be easy if you are just prepared and has followed all these vital interview tips.

Interviews tips Inside The Mind Of A Candidate
Inside The Mind Of A Candidate

Employer

Inside the Mind of a Candidate *

31 July 2017 by Guest Author

Jesse orrico 60373 e1501500515566 Inside The Mind Of A Candidate

If you’ve ever wondered what a candidate is thinking then you can stop second-guessing thanks to LinkedIn. It carried out a global study called, Inside the Mind of Today’s Candidate, which sought the views of over 6,500 professionals and 7,700 recent job-switchers.

Their findings revealed that while 4 out of 5 (82 per cent) British professionals are interested in new job opportunities, almost two-thirds (63 per cent) of the UK’s recent job-switchers did not know or knew very little about their current employer before hearing about their job.

UK employers could be missing opportunities to attract top candidates by not building awareness of their brand among potential future hires. The research also revealed that one in five job-seekers in the UK are unable to clearly see what it would be like to work for an employer prior to applying for a job, with 14 per cent citing too vague information on would-be employers’ websites.

Commenting on the research, Jon Addison, head of Talent Solutions at LinkedIn UK, said:
With over 5.5 million companies in the UK and unemployment currently at a 42 year low, today’s job market is candidate-centric, giving job-seekers a wealth of options when looking for their next role. One effect of this is that the battle for talent between employers has become fierce, and British employers cannot afford to rest on their laurels when it comes to attracting candidates – both
active and passive.

Our research shows that while the potential candidate pool in the UK is huge, with four out of five professionals interested in hearing about new opportunities, British businesses simply aren’t doing enough to promote their employer brands and show candidates why they are great places to work. It’s important that they address this, or risk being left behind as top talent
joins forces with better known brands.

Top tips for building employer brand awareness *

To help businesses – large or small – better connect with prospective hires, Jon Addison shared the following tips for building awareness of your employer brand.
● Join up recruitment and marketing: ​By drawing on the skills and experience of marketing specialists in your organisation, recruitment teams can make sure they are pitching their employer brand message in ways that will resonate with and reach your target audience
● Leverage your employee ambassadors: ​No one can say why you’re a great place to work as well as your existing employees. Encourage them to share their experiences of work with their own networks to widen the pool of potential candidates you reach.
● Get creative: ​To stand out from the crowd as an employer, it is important to inject creativity into your employer brand campaigns. This doesn’t need to cost the earth; a simple social strategy, or developing engaging content for your website can be effective ways of showing
what you offer to candidates.

LinkedIn’s research also revealed the top things that most motivate British professionals to look for a new job, with better pay topping the list, closely followed by wanting a better match in interests and wanting a better work-life balance.

 

Related *

Tags: candidatesEmployer Brand AwarenessJon AddisonLinkedInRecruiting
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Images 12 sq 300x185 1 5 Ways To Land Your Dream Job With These Top Interview Tips
5 Ways To Land Your Dream Job With These Top Interview Tips

Candidate

5 Ways to Land Your Dream Job with These Top Interview Tips *

26 July 2017 by Guest Author

Handshake 2056021 1920 e1500893586856 5 Ways To Land Your Dream Job With These Top Interview Tips

Hands up! Who loves the sweaty palm inducing process that is the ‘dream job interview’? So far, you have impressed them with your CV and completed a great application form. You may have aced tests and now comes the face-to-face meeting.

Now is your chance to shine and show the interview panel that you have the personality as well as the skills to do the job and fit right into their culture.

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But your mind is blank and your mouth dry. They ask you a question you weren’t expecting and you feel your dream job slipping away before your very eyes. STOP this happening with these five great ways to grab the upper hand at your next job interview.

1. Prepare for the obvious questions *

No two interviews are the same and with every business interviewing candidates differently, it is hard to come with a set formula for your pre-interview research.

However, spending some time preempting some of the possible questions is a great way to spend half an hour or so in the days before the interview. If you were on the panel, what questions would you ask?

These questions might not come up in your interview but they may be worth pondering;

  • How do you stay up to date with issues in our field? What blogs etc. do you follow?
  • What do you think are the key issues OR what problems can you foresee in the future?
  • Where do you see yourself in X years’ time?

It is also worthwhile preparing for the icebreaker question – tell us a bit more about you? – even though you are an expert on you, it is amazing how quickly your mind forgets the very basics of your life!

Top tip – interviewers and interviewing panels are not looking for the perfect answer. What they are looking for is someone who has clearly done their research and can present a reasoned argument or answer under pressure.

2. Bring backup *

This doesn’t mean bringing your mum but bringing materials that back up what you talk about in the interview. Anyone can say that they turned a business around, bringing a 50% rise in membership, for example, but bring the information to back it up – what about a colourful spreadsheet or graph – and the panel can see that again, you are the person who likes to be prepared.

Print a couple of copies, make sure your name is all over them and have a keen eye for the detail and leave them with the panel at the end of your interview.

3. Interviewers are not always experts *

Sifting through CVs and application forms, meeting and greeting candidates and interviewing people is a time-consuming process. It comes on top of all their other responsibilities and thus, the interviewer can often be less prepared than they would like.

See this as an opportunity and a means by which you can steer the conversation. This works well for you both. The interviewer or panel get a great interview with plenty of insight and you show yourself to be uber-capable of taking on the role.

BUT – and this is a big but – don’t go flying in there assuming that the interviewer is ill-prepared and that you are their saviour! Check the situation first because some companies will wheel out their most experienced interviewer to wheedle out those that say they walk the walk, and talk the talk, but don’t really deliver.

4. Ask the right questions *

You now the question is coming, “Do you have any questions?”. It is the part of the interview that most people stress out about and mess up as a result.

There are some fantastic creative questions you could ask but take care that they don’t come across as being too off the wall or rude;

  • What do see as my goals for the first 3/6/9/12 months in the post?
  • How will my success be measured?
  • What skills do you think are needed to excel in this role?
  • What are the biggest challenges the company is facing right now?

Top tip – these are just a few examples and work well but no matter what questions you ask, make sure they are not ‘yes and no’ ones. Interviews are a two-way street!

5. Look at your body language *

Some people have a practice run with a friend and have the ‘interview’ videoed and the results can be surprising. Did you know your play with your rings or wring your hands? Were you aware you constantly touch your nose or your ear when nervous? Do you lean too far forward or slouch in the chair?

Preparing for an interview is about looking at the whole picture and understanding how you come across. It could be that you are too enthusiastic if there is such a thing, or maybe you are not vibrant enough. Giving the right impression at an interview is about creating the right impression from the moment you walk into a room till the moment you leave.

Use these five tips to be better prepared and remember, make a point of slowing down your speech (we garble when we are nervous), concentrate on steadying your breathing, relax and if you can, enjoy it too.

About the author: This article was written by the team at NCC Home Learning, one of the fastest growing online learning providers in the UK. With many years’ experience in helping students to study for the qualifications and skills that propel their careers from ordinary to extraordinary, the NCC team also know the importance of interviewing well too. These tips were gathered from their own in-house team, as well as from students over the years. 

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Related *

Tags: candidatesdream jobInterview PreparationInterview TipsInterviewersNCC Learning
156a68b195ebdd6d7985ddfc7155f533 5 Ways To Land Your Dream Job With These Top Interview Tips
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    Why use recruiter Why Use Agency For Recruitment As According To Jacob
    Why Use Agency For Recruitment As According To Jacob
    1. You Need to Fill a Critical Position *

    The number one reason to hire a recruiting firm is that there is an unfilled position critical to running your business. Recruiting firms provide high-quality candidates in a shorter time-frame than an in-house HR department.

    2. Best hires *

    Recruiting firms have access to the best of the best candidates wherever they may be.

    3. Huge Network *

    Recruiting firms know where to find talent, how to reach out, communicate, screen and present candidates from any location and background.

    4. More than inbound applicants *

    Recruiting firms do much more than just rely on job boards and filter through dozens of subpar resumes, they actively search for the best candidates which cuts down on time lost managing underqualified job seekers.

    5. Industry knowledge *

    Recruiting firms know where to find potential employees and more importantly, they also know the necessary skillsets, salary rates, and career expectations for specific industries and categories.

    6. Free your time *

    Most recruiting firms offer additional services such as background checks, sourcing candidates, reference checking, and pre-interview screening, all of which free your time.

    Images Why Use Agency For Recruitment As According To Jacob

    7. Quality not quantity *

    Because the end goal is to hire the most qualified and appropriate candidate, the best-recruiting firms aim to find a loyal employee and will offer longer guarantee periods — typically 3 months.

    8. Company representation *

    Building a strong relationship with a recruiter helps you attract the best employees as the recruiting firm will promote your company’s culture and employee benefits to potential candidates.

    9. Focus *

    While your primary focus is running your business, your recruiter’s focus is finding you the best hire. Assigning hiring tasks to an overwhelmed hiring manager or HR department could delay the process and even prove costly.

    10. Avoid mistakes *

    Hiring the wrong person can be far costlier than hiring a recruiter. Besides the cost of onboarding and training the wrong person, there are significant costs to repeating the process for a replacement and perhaps a decline in employee morale. Recruiting firms are dedicated to finding a candidate with stability.

    Worst cover letter mistakes 300x300 1 Resume Writing 6 Frequently Asked Questions To Take Note
    Resume Writing: 6 Frequently Asked Questions To Take Note

    What is the best practice for Resume Writing? *

    There are lots of common questions that arise when it comes to resume writing, so we thought we’d provide you with the answers to some of the most frequently asked questions to do with it. Hopefully these can be of some help!

    1) How long should my resume be? *

    Recruiters receive a high volume of resumes for each role.It’s important that yours is scannable. They can make their mind up about whether they are interested in yours quickly.

    Limiting yours to 1-2 pages is probably best. Make sure you include all of the information that you feel will be relevant to your job hunt. It is important that you do not feel restricted when you do resume writing.

    Bullet points and subheadings can help to cut down the length. This makes it easier for recruiters to identify the information they are after.

    2) What should be included in resume writing? *

    Your resume needs to provide employers with a well-rounded idea of your professional experience and career to date, highlighting all of your relevant skills and achievements.

    Some choose to write a short personal summary introducing who they are, where their experience lies and what kind of career step they are looking to make next, which is great for giving your resume a personal touch.

    The key information that should be noted on resume writing are contact information, previous work experience, education, your top accomplishments and relevant skills. Including keywords that have been used in the job description will help to ensure your resume is flagged up when resume scanning software is used.

    3) Should resume writing needs to be chronologically or functionally? *

    The format that you use for resume writing really depends on where you are in your career and the relevance of your past experience for the role you are applying for.

    A reverse Chronological Resume Writing Style is the most popular format to use and lists your previous work experience from the most recent, to the oldest, along with information about your responsibilities and achievements within each role.

    This format works well for people who have already established their career and are looking to progress in the same sector; rather than people who are looking for their first job or changing careers.

    A Functional Resume Writing is much more skills-based and places focus on the information that is most relevant to the particular role. The main substance of your resume should be a list of your top achievements and experience that is most pertinent to the job.

    You should still provide a summary of your work experience. However, this can be placed lower down on your resume; allowing you to be a bit more discreet about any employment gaps or a lack of professional experience.

    4) How should I handle employment gaps in resume writing? *

    The likelihood of an employment gap damaging your chances of landing a new job really depends on two things. One, how long ago it was. Second, how long it was for. If the period of time was years ago and you’ve been back in work for some time, it really isn’t anything to worry about and will probably go unnoticed.

    On the other hand, if your break in employment has happened more recently, which has spanned over several months or even years, then you may want to think about how you can explain this in a way that won’t hinder your job hunt.

    So before resume writing, think about what activities you’ve got involved in during that time and any unpaid experience such as volunteering or community projects that you can use to fill the gaps. You may also wish to provide a brief explanation about any gaps in your cover letter when you apply for a role.

    5) What if I have no experience? *

    If you’ve only just graduated or are looking for your first job, you may feel like you don’t have any work experience to list. You end up confused in resume writing. The key to this is showing passion. You may want to elaborate on the skills that you have developed throughout education and other non-professional experiences.

    So in resume writing, you make an enthusiastic personal summary. You can demonstrate that you are driven. Try to show that you are focused on building a career within a certain area.

    You should then provide a list of all of your qualifications, hobbies and past projects. Highlight all these that have allowed you to develop transferable skills that make you equipped for the job.

    Even if you have no formal work experience, volunteer work and undertaking projects at school/uni allow you to develop skills. You can explore areas such as customer service, time management and team work that will benefit you professionally.

    6) Should I tailor my resume? *

    Yes. What works for one role may not work for another. Thus, making alterations in resume writing for particular roles can boost your chances of being considered for the job.

    Reorder information on your resume. Position the most relevant experience in the highest part of your resume. Feature keywords used in the job descriptions by rewording information on your resume. When doing this, read the job description thoroughly. Then, match up the requirements with the experience that you possess.

    A great resume writing skill is as important as our great personality during job interviews. A well-presented resume can get us nearer to job success. So we better improve our resume writing style and ask ourselves those 6 frequently asked questions, too. So, start your job search now. Try Complete Staff Solutions. And, wow them with your good resume writing skills.

    Ace your interview prepare yourself Interview Tips 101 How To Ace Your Interview And Land The Job
    Interview Tips 101: How To Ace Your Interview And Land The Job?

    There are actually no interview tips that can get us a job that easily, but at least we have guide to help us land a job.

    The interview is your opportunity to make an unforgettable impression on the company you want to work for and get the job you want. Here are some interview tips and pointers that will help you make that positive impression:

    Preparation: *

    Always be fully prepared – often it is the one thing that an otherwise very competent candidate is lacking. DO YOUR HOMEWORK! Some of you are wondering what does that mean? Some tips for that include:

    • Drive to the location before the interview so that you know how to get there, where there is parking etc
    • Know the full name and title of the individual you are to meet with.
    • Learn as much as you can about the company.
    • Find out as much as you can about the interviewer and what they look for in a good candidate.
    • Know what your goals and objectives are for the future so that you can measure these against what is being offered.
    • Prepare questions that are specific to that position and that company.
    • Always be professionally dressed. Even in business casual environments a business suit is required for the interview process.
    • Arrive on time.
    • Bring hard copies of your resume. Often the interviewer will have printed it for themselves but it is always good practice to have it on hand just in case.
    • Bring a pen and a note pad in case you want to or need to make any notes
    The Interview: *

    Remember this is your opportunity to shine.

    • When greeting the interviewer make eye contact, extend a firm handshake and address your interviewer by last name.
    • The interview is your chance to bring forth your strengths and to point out areas of your expertise that are applicable to this position. If you think you might forget some of these at the time, because of nerves, then be sure to list them on your note pad and, with your interviewer’s permission, refer to them. It would be best if you could remember them in case you do not get the opportunity to refer to your notes.
    • Practice your answers; it will help in your memory.
    • If you are interested in the opportunity, indicate that to the prospective employer.
    Do’s and Don’ts: *
    • Be on time or a few minutes ahead of the scheduled time.
    • If an application is necessary; fill it out in its entirety. Nothing is more annoying to an interviewer than looking at a blank application if it is part of their process. This, ladies and gentlemen, applies equally to interviews with companies and recruitment firms.
    • Remember to smile and present yourself in an energetic and professional manner at all times.
    • Never speak negatively about past employers or peers.
    • Always maintain eye contact.
    • Ask questions that are pertinent to the position and company.
    • Point out areas that are a match between your skills and the requirements of the position.
    • Be prepared to discuss ways in which you have excelled or situations where you have demonstrated your initiative and ability to be proactive.
    • Be enthusiastic and positive.
    • Bring an original copy of your resume.
    • Always answer with a complete sentence. No “yes” or “no” answers.
    • Never smoke or chew gum in an interview.
    Questions: *
    Arrive prepared to answer questions about: *
    • Your strengths and weaknesses.
    • Why you are interested in that company.
    • What you know about the company.
    • Why they should hire you
    Arrive prepared to ask questions, such as: *
    • What would be my day to day responsibilities?
    • Then, what is the career path from this position?
    • What is the company policy on promoting from within?
    • How do I fit this role?
    Do not ask questions like: *
    • How much vacation do you offer?
    • Never initiate the salary question. Let your interviewer bring it up at the appropriate time.
    • How many sick days are offered?
    • Interview tips such as these only leave the impression that you are only interested in how this role and company will serve your needs rather than a give and take of rights, expectations and responsibilities.
    When Interviewing with a Recruiting Firm: *

    This step in the process is often underestimated and mistreated. In the current market, more than 70% of available opportunities are handled by recruitment firms. This includes permanent, contract, temporary, and project. Please remember when you have a meeting with a recruiter whatever side of your personality you choose to display is the side your recruiter will tell their client about.

    If you mistreat your recruiter by being late, not completing their internal forms, being surly and uncooperative in the interview with them or in the time you spend in their reception area they WILL NOT REFER YOUR RESUME to their client. This is not because they want to be mean to you but because you are their reputation. Give this some thought…recruiters do not manufacture anything, Their product is their customer service and YOU.

    If you, the candidate, mistreat the recruiter they can only assume you will also mistreat their client. They have worked long and hard to get that client and they will not risk sending someone in who will potentially damage that relationship.

    Recruitment Agency Advertising sq Best Way To Advertise A Job Vacancy
    Best Way To Advertise A Job Vacancy

    When your business has a need to fill a short-term role or recruit permanent staff, there are a number of ways to promote your needs. Let us take a look at some of the common methods used.

    Noticeboards and local papers *

    Advertising a job opening on a noticeboard in a local shopping centre or around universities is a great way to attract those who are seeking temporary work. This method is generally free, unlike paying for an ad to be printed in a local paper however both can be rather hit and miss.

    Without the ability to track views, it is almost like advertising blind. It is also a rather limiting approach as you are only able to reach those in your local area.

    Online

    Technology advances have made advertising job opportunities online easy for many businesses. This avenue expands the scope of those who can see and, therefore, apply for your role. It can, however, come with quite an expensive price tag.

    Even if your business finds an appropriate candidate to interview, it becomes a time-consuming process, which does not always result in a positive outcome.

    Labour hire firm *

    Whilst traditional recruitment agencies are very popular, a labour hire firm benefits businesses in many ways. As the employer of job seekers, labour hire companies pride themselves on ensuring their database of skilled staff are accredited, experienced and qualified to commence a job anytime and fulfill a need no matter how large or small.

    Here are the top three advantages of using a labour hire firm:

    • Flexibility A job vacancy can be filled in at short notice.
    • Seasonal –Staff can be recruited to service seasonal demands and adjust your workforce to suit your needs.
    • Easier – It saves your business time and money recruiting over and over.

    When your business next has a job vacancy, don’t spend time and effort advertising and then more time recruiting candidates.

    Align your business with Complete Staff Solutions, a local expert in blue and white-collar employment and fill your needs no matter what time of the day or night it is.

     

    Careers job 5 Ways To Get Ahead When Your Job 8217 s At Risk
    5 Ways To Get Ahead When Your Job’s At Risk

    Being told your job is under review and that there’s a possibility of redundancy is like a dagger to the chest. Years of loyal service, late nights and early mornings only to be told, ‘we probably won’t need you anymore’! It’s like a Shakespearian betrayal. Okay, maybe not quite a Shakespearian betrayal… at least there will be some kind of compensation package to soften the blow. However, once you’ve accepted that your job is on the line, it’s important to be proactive.

    Individuals who are the least proactive and unprepared, both practically and mentally, are the ones who suffer the most. For this reason I have developed 5 smart strategies. If redundancy does take place, you’ll already be in a position to move in to a new job and importantly a job which meets your professional ambition and fulfils your financial expectations.

    1. Understand your CV *

    Do this to see the type of response you receive. Are recruitment agencies contacting you? How many jobs are you applying for before you are invited to interview? This will give you a clearer idea of market conditions. If you find that the response isn’t reflective of your expectations, which from my experience is usually the case, you can use that period to improve your CV/Résumé ahead of time. By having a better understanding of the market and already having an effective CV/Résumé will put you one step ahead of the competition.

    2. Assess your own job *

    Think about where you see yourself in the next 5 years, and whether realistically you will be able to achieve that target within your current organisation. This applies especially if you’ve been at the company for a short time and you know that your redundancy package is going to be an insignificant amount. Therefore if you receive a job offer, you can accept it knowing that it’s a job you want and for a company that can progress your career.

    3. Set boundaries *

    Due to financial circumstances many people are forced in to accepting a job that they wouldn’t normally consider. Despite providing the stability needed in the short term, it can sometimes have a detrimental impact on your long term career progression. The realities of this situation only come to light once you’re in the job and the anxiety of how you’re going to pay the bills are no longer an issue. By having a clearer understanding of market conditions and the types of jobs you are willing and unwilling to do will give you greater control of the process. This will allow you to make more informed decisions. Furthermore, make it clear to recruitment agencies the type of positions you are looking for.

    4. Focus on your network *

    If you’re not on LinkedIn; sign up and start increasing your network. Focus on connecting with people that could potentially be valuable when it comes to hitting the job market, such as HR Managers & other advisors, and potential line managers. So if you are told that you’re going to be made redundant, you already have a wide network of people that you can contact instantly about possible opportunities.

    5. Attend interviews *

    Whether you want the job or not, you have to remember that interview questions are a two way process and there is no compulsion for you to take the job (just like there is no compulsion them to offer you the job). This is a great way to familiarise yourself with the interviews process, as well as polishing your interview skills. If you find that your interview performances are not reflective of your true ability, than I would recommend getting some professional help.

    Being proactive is the key and by following these 5 simple strategies, you can confront the possibility of redundancy head on and most importantly come out of the other side stronger and better!

    “A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity, an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty”- Winston Churchill

    Global Job Search – Indeed Au

    A new job is a priority for many jobseekers at the start of the year. In fact, our research shows over half of Australian workers consider a career change during this period. And this phenomena isn’t isolated to Australia. We also see a jump in job interest among other countries where Indeed has sites. This surge in jobseeker activity means that it’s a great time for all employers to post a job. And even as searches grew in January, it’s important to remember that any time of year is good for finding the perfect candidate.

    But what professions are people actually searching for? Let’s take a quick tour around Indeed’s global job search data to find out what’s trending and where. Below are some of the fastest growing searches we saw at the end of 2016:

    Australia

    Australia saw tremendous growth in searches for nurses and teachers, two professions facing serious shortages. The 627.4% growth in searches for nursing jobs is one of the largest trends we identified. Nurses are one of the top jobs listed on the Australian National Skill shortage list. It’s a promising sign to see jobseeker interest growing so rapidly in this understaffed field.

    We identified another surge in searches for data scientist. A job where we see interest on the rise, not only in AU, but in many countries. There is also new interest in transportation jobs, which may not be a surprise when you consider that in Western Australia train drivers can make over $100,000 AUD, making them among highest paid in the world.

    Belgium

    The largest spike among jobseekers (110%) in Belgium is for dietitian jobs. This is not a surprising trend coming from a country known for their chocolate, waffle, fries and beer. Many western countries experience a diet and fitness fads around the start of the new year, but Belgium is experiencing the most drastic growth in job interest for this field globally. This could be a labour market reaction to the the 172,000 tons of chocolate produced annually in Belgium.

    Belgium is also seeing similar growth in nursing, education and tech roles. However, growth in searches for “occupational therapist” is particularly strong in Belgium. This growth makes sense considering the makeup of the Belgian workforce. Over half the Belgian population works in the service industry, a sector prone to cause physical stress or exertion. Another hypothesis for this trend is driven by the aging population. Occupational therapists can help older people recover from various illnesses through activities designed to stimulate their physical cognitive processes.

    France

    France is showing strong growth in some caring professions: special education teachers and nurses in particular. However, we don’t see quite the same massive increases we are observing in some countries. Still the 174.9% jump in searches for “special education teacher” is a big trend in France. The French education system provides free education to children from preschool to high school and some college equivalent training. Recruiters from private medical clinics or individual schools should take note of this growing interest should they need to hire special education teachers.

    Financial controllers are ……………………………

    Germany

    Germany saw massive growth in English translator jobs. This surge (899.9%) is the largest global trend we’ve identified in jobseeker behaviour during the period of this analysis. Europe is experiencing unprecedented streams of refugees streaming in from Syria, North Africa and Middle East. Syria alone has sent over 300,000 refugees into Germany.  Since migrants are more likely to speak English than German as a second language, this spike in interest may represent an effort to overcome the shortage of Arabic-German translators.

    There was also a triple-digit increase in interest for engineering jobsanical and software engineering jobs…………………………….

    Ireland

    In Ireland the number of people searching for “model” saw 242.5% growth in the last quarter of 2016. Our analysis didn’t uncover anything like this spike in interest anywhere else—it’s unique to the Emerald Isle. Most of the people who search for ‘model’ click on fashion model jobs at media and marketing companies, as well as staffing agencies and talent vendors.

    There was also strong interest in process engineer jobs, which may be (slightly) less glamorous but are needed across many industries due to the widely applicable skill set. Process engineers can be found in multiple sectors ranging from agricultural to pharmaceutical to software engineering. There was also close to a 100% spike in the number of people searching for work as Spanish teachers, more than any other language or type of educator.

    United Kingdom

    Meanwhile in the U.K., one job with strong growth was related to helping other people get jobs — ”job coach.” The surge of interest in “smart metering” is also interesting. As more and more ordinary devices are connected to the internet, traditional jobs evolve to account for this technological change, and the interest from jobseekers shows that many are increasingly aware of the demand for new skills. The dark side of technology has also had an impact, as we saw more than 100% growth in searches for cybersecurity jobs, suggesting that jobseekers with the right skills are paying close attention to the headlines and know how much these skills are in demand.

    United States

    Over the past few years, we’ve observed the explosion of jobs requiring technical skills and the struggle by employer to fill those roles. Fortunately, jobseekers are showing growing interest in many tech roles. Ruby developer experienced a staggering 656.1% jump in searches by jobseekers. As is the 557.2% spike in searches for “UX designer.” These two jobs are among the fastest growing searches on Indeed.

    The 191.0% growth in search for “devops engineer” is promising for the tech industry. According to our research, that is the tech role with the 2nd worst supply vs.demand mismatch and ranked 3rd for employer demand. However, we also see some strong growth in jobs that require less technical skills. For instance, welder fabricator requires only a high school diploma and training, but pays well above minimum wage.

    It’s a great time to post a job

    These are some of the jobs that we saw trending as we entered 2017, and it will be interesting to see which professions are on the rise as the year gets underway. This surge in jobseeker activity means that it’s a good time for all employers to post a job. And even as searches grew in January, it’s important to remember that any time of year is good for finding the perfect candidate.

     

     

     

    Article Source 

    Global Spotlight: What Jobs Are Trending Across the World?

     

    Interview prep sq 1 300x200 1 1 8 Essential Interview Tips By A Recruiter
    8 Essential Interview Tips By A Recruiter

    As a recruitment company, we feel we can offer job seekers some well needed interview tips into the mind-set of recruiters and our decision making processes. *

    We see so many worthy candidates that we have to trust our instincts when it comes to choosing the cream of the crop. So here are the interview tips to make you a stronger candidate for the job outside of your CV.

    1. Personality *

    Robots might be intriguing to watch but that doesn’t mean companies want one working for them. Someone who comes across as genuine and confident about themselves and their opinions will prove far more popular than a candidate wearing a polite mask of agreement. Building a rapport with an interviewer means that you will be more memorable, and have more chance of standing out from the crowd. And let’s face it – in a group of potential candidates, all with impressive backgrounds, the best way to get noticed is to connect with the interviewer on a more personal level.

    2. Vibe *

    That indescribable feeling that someone gives you – it can either put you at ease around them or do the opposite. Us humans make snap judgments – it’s pure instinct – so being positive, smiling and greeting the interviewer confidently can help them feel positive about you in return.

    3. Sociability *

    Long office hours and working as part of a team requires the ability to interact well with a number of different people. As biased as it might be, the recruiter will want someone who fits in with the team on more than just a work level. Companies are increasingly focusing on the culture and community of the work place. Usually, the most efficient employees are those happy employees.

    4. Natural ability *

    If you are able to pick things up quickly this will lessen the amount of hand-holding needed in training – a huge benefit for companies. These days, employers are particularly worried about graduates; their lack of real work experience can mean they take more time to adapt to a work environment. Unless it’s a job that comes with training, companies will want a smooth change over between employees.

    5. Appearance *

    A well-groomed appearance shows you understand the level of dress that’s generally expected in professional environments. Heed the saying ‘it is better to be over dressed than under dressed’. At the same time don’t let worrying about your outfit make you late for the actual interview – aim to arrive 10-15 minutes before the scheduled time.

    6. Body language *

    Recruiters register body language – crossing your legs or arms might be a subconscious move, but remember to check yourself every once in a while and think about how your body language might be coming across. And yes, constant eye contact might feel a tad awkward in a small interview room, but it looks a lot better than staring at the desk the whole time.

    7. Duration of roles *

    Websites and companies often under-rate certain aspects that recruiters will actually pay more attention to. For example, someone with 3 or 4 internships might, on paper, look better than someone with only 1 or 2. But consider the strength of each individual placement. Recruiters will note the length of time spent at each company and will get references about the candidate.

    The candidate with only 1 internship may have spent 6 months there and have a glowing reference. If the other candidate’s internships are for shorter periods of time, with only standard references, the recruiter will choose the first candidate. A recruiter is searching for a strong candidate that will take to the task immediately. He will become a fixed member of the team.

    8. Homework *

    Doing your research on the company is one of the essential interview tips! It means when they come to asking you tricky questions you can deflect them by relating it back to the company. You also use them as an example. Showing an understanding of the company and giving your own insight will tell the interviewer a great deal about your work ethic and ability. It also gives you the opportunity to ask your own questions and take control over the interview so it is not all one-sided. You can avoid making it feel more like a discussion.

    Of course, looking good on paper is imperative, especially for securing those all-important interviews. However, during the interview, it’s those little extras that help the interviewer decide which candidate to go with.

    How do we know that this process works? We follow up on each and every candidate that we’ve recommended. We wouldn’t be successful in the recruitment industry if we didn’t to put the right people forward for the right positions. For companies to confidently invest in us, we make it our business to get to know each and every candidate. All these are interview tips I can share as a recruiter.

    Part time workers to full time Can Labour Hire Or Part Time Workers Become Part Time Employees
    Can Labour Hire Or Part Time Workers Become Part-Time Employees

    The benefits of part-time workers to your business are enormous. Let’s take a look at some of these benefits.

    Flexibility for full-time employees *

    Part-time workers allow your full-time workers to enjoy some level of flexibility with their work hours. Why is this important, you ask? Well, if you can help them balance their personal lives and work, they will be much happier. Happy employees are more productive, motivated and less likely to leave your business for another.

    Peak time/season cover *

    In some industries, peak times or seasons are very hectic and labour demanding. Part-time workers provide the extra “hands” needed to cope with the increased demand so as to prevent overworking your regular staff. If your regular staff become overworked during these seasons, they become stressed and less productive which will affect the quality of the product or service and hence customer satisfaction. This, if not stopped in time, could have a detrimental effect on the business.

    Job-sharing *

    This is an outcome that can only be achieved with part-time workers. Job-sharing is where two or more part-time workers share the responsibility, pay and benefits of a single full-time job. The proportion of pay and benefits given to each worker is determined by the hours they work. This kind of arrangement is especially ideal for jobs where the worker needs to be highly alert at all times.

    Avoiding overtime *

    Overtime is expensive (compared to paying for regular hours) and the productivity of the employees has possibly dipped as they have been on the job for far too long and fatigue is creeping in. With part-time workers, you get a fresh person to do the job at a fraction of the cost.

    Extra expertise *

    Sometimes your business requires a certain type of skill set that is not often used but important all the same. Hiring a permanent worker would cost too much for a skill that you require maybe once or twice a week. Part-time employees provide the perfect solution; there when you need them to satisfy your business needs.

    Once hired employees are the best part-time workers *

    Now to the big question: Can labour hire employees be part-time workers? The answer is Yes! Of course they will not have the title of a ” “, but on hired employees or temps can serve the same function as part-time workers. There are also some added advantages to bringing in temps as part-time workers in your company.

    These include: *

    1. Reduced cost. With temps, you are not responsible for looking to find the employee – which is costly in terms of time, money and human resources. It is the labour hire agency’s job to look for the employee, vet them and provide them to you. They also maintain their employees’ payroll saving you the trouble and cost of doing it.
    2. Access to a larger skill pool. Labour hire firms provide employees to a variety of industries which gives them access to a very wide skill pool.
    3. Emergency cover. Labour hire agencies have a lot of employees on stand-by which means that you can get cover for an emergency with minimal interruptions due to the labour shortage.
    Resume interview 5 Ways To Simplify A Long Cv While Maintaining Sophistication And Nuance
    5 Ways To Simplify A Long Cv While Maintaining Sophistication And Nuance

    Confession time: recruitment is as much about quantity as it is about quality, and most recruiters work in a permanent state of overdrive to hit volume and placement targets.

    As a result, successful recruiters are efficient recruiters: those who are able to quickly get through the huge stack of CVs sitting on their desks.

    What does this mean for you? There’s no surer way to make a recruiter run screaming in the other direction than to hand over a multi-page monstrosity of a CV.

    If your CV is more than 4 pages long or doesn’t follow a simple, easy-to-read format, you’d be well served by taking some time to simplify. The good news is: simple doesn’t equal plain, and it’s possible to have a sophisticated and nuanced CV without causing recruiters’ eyes to glaze over, beginning with these 5 strategies.

    1. Use Grouping to your Advantage.

    While reverse chronological CVs are certainly the most common – and preferred – CV style, you shouldn’t be afraid to tweak this tried and true format if you have a legitimate reason.

    Professionals with significant project experience, consultants or sole traders with multiple clients, and people who’ve switched positions frequently within the same company are most likely to benefit from this technique, as it allows for a succinct summary of multiple roles.

    The trick is to group responsibilities together whilst still highlighting individual projects and accomplishments.

    My team does this by describing role mandates and common responsibilities in 5 or 6 bullet points, and creating a ‘Key Engagements’ or ‘Projects’ section with 1 to 2 bullet points per project to describe your role and highlight results.

    1. Use the Russian Doll Approach.

    I swear by this approach, because it allows me to subtly direct the readers’ attention to the most important experience, which is typically also the most recent.*

    Think of your current role as the largest in a set of nesting Russian matryoshka dolls: because it’s the most important, it should take up the most amount of space – around 5 to 7 ‘responsibilities’ bullet points and 3 to 5 ‘accomplishments’ bullet points.

    As you move further back in your career history, imagine each role as a smaller doll, and give it less space on the page. This will keep the overall length in check, while allowing you to give the most important information the detailed approach it deserves.

    *Of course, this approach only works if your most recent experience is indeed the most relevant.

    1. Master the Mandate.

    If I’m honest, most long and complex CVs don’t have to be; the writer simply didn’t do a great job at presenting the information briefly.

    Considering you only have 6 seconds to capture a recruiters’ attention, its crucial you make the time you have count. That means putting the most important information for each role up-front, so even recruiters that stop reading past the first bullet point get a good idea of what you did.

    Make the first bullet point for each role a ‘super bullet’ that includes:

    1. a high-level overview of the role,
    2. the mandate,
    3. and the main target.

    Here’s an example: Divisional leadership role [overview] driving market expansion across 5 APAC markets[mandate] to turn around financial performance and restore divisional profitability [target].

    1. What-Why Writing.

    Many people have difficulty summarizing a role using less than 10 bullet points, and as a result, role descriptions spiral out of control and take up way more space than they need to.

    The solution is to create fewer, but more complex, bullet points, using What-Why writing.

    For each ‘responsibility’ bullet point, express what you did, leading with an action verb, and why you did it, showing the positive impact your actions had.

    For example: Forged cross-functional partnerships with senior client stakeholders (what) to identify business requirements and ensure the project plan aligned with organizational priorities (why).

    1. Be Selective.

    It always baffles me when clients list every job and short course they’ve ever completed on their CV.

    It’s hugely distracting, and often has the opposite effect to that intended, detracting from the experience and qualifications you really want the recruiter to notice, or making you look unfocused or out-of-touch.

    While deleting irrelevant qualifications and experience is a must, sometimes it’s not enough. If that’s the case, use grouping and formatting to your advantage:

    • Create a ‘Selected Qualifications’ section on the first page to draw attention to 3 or 4 of your most impressive credentials. Move all other relevant qualifications to an ‘Additional Qualifications’ section on the back page.
    • Group similar qualifications together rather than listing them out separately:
      • Australian Marketing Institute Short Courses: Public Relations Writing Tactics (2015), Event Promotions & Sponsorship (2013), Social Media Marketing (2012).
    • List your most recent career experience in a ‘Professional Summary’ section on the first page, providing details for each role in the ‘Career Experience’ section. Create an ‘Additional Experience’ section to list, but not detail, roles prior to the past 10 years.

    Before you hit “SEND” on a job application, ask yourself if the recruiter has to go digging for the good stuff. If they require a Rosetta stone to decipher your CV, chances are they’ll move on to the next candidate.

    Remember that the best CVs are both sophisticated and easy to read. Do yourself a favor and take a few hours to simplify – in a smart way – and enjoy the results.

    Recruitment process white board Recruitment Agencies 10 Step Hiring Process
    Recruitment Agencies 10 Step Hiring Process

    Do you want to hire employees who can contribute to your success and profitability while adding value to your culture and your team? Employers can shorten their recruitment cycle, find great employees, legally and ethically hire people if they follow these ten steps of our Complete Hiring Process.

    Identify the need for the position. *

    The first step in any hiring process is to determine the need for a new or replacement position in your company. One of the methods used is sales per employee. But, overall workload and its effect on current employees and the accomplishment of your business goals will also drive this decision.

    The hiring decision must also balance with the needs of the rest of the organization for employees. Your priority for an employee has to fit into the successful execution of the company’s business plan. It’s important to keep your other employees informed or involved at each step of the staffing decision process.

    Plan your recruitment for the job. *

    The second step in the hiring process is to plan your employee recruitment. Recruitment planning identifies the job description or job specification for the position so you know the skills and experience you are seeking.

    It also addresses how you will publicize the position, who will review applications, and who will participate in first and second interviews. You also decide who will participate in the selection of the employee for the job and who will provide input.

    This is a key step in a successful employee hiring process. It’s also a key step with the employees who comprise the interview team. You need to be clear about how their input will be used by the hiring manager and Human Resources.

    Publicize the availability of the open position. *

    An important step in the posting process is to notify current employees of the opening. If you believe that you have no qualified internal candidates, you may also post the position externally simultaneously. But your internal applicants may surprise you with their talent and skills. If you do post the position externally before interviewing internal candidates, let the employees know.

    You want to avoid misunderstandings. Your best bets externally for filling your open position will vary by job. Some local jobs, especially for nonexempt roles rely on local newspaper classifieds. But, most jobs will require an online campaign through posting the job on job sites and in social media.

    Your own website is significant for recruiting employees who seek out your company in particular. Notifying your network on LinkedIn can bring quality candidates to your attention. So will asking your current employees to publicize your opening on their social networks.

    Review applications. *

    If you have advertised the position effectively, you will have collected a large pool of applicants. HR can take the lead on resume and cover letter review and give the qualified applicants to the hiring manager.

    Or, some hiring managers may want to see all of the applications, especially for technical, scientific, engineering, and development positions. The applications are reviewed and the most qualified applicants receive a phone interview.

    The purpose of the screening is to save staff time and energy by eliminating candidates. The screener, the hiring manager or HR staff, are looking for both cultural fit and job fit during a telephone interview. They check out any questions the reviewers have about the individual’s experience or credentials.

    Interview the most qualified prospective employees. *

    Your application review and phone interview process should narrow down the field of candidates to the most qualified. Schedule interviews for these candidates with the same group of employees who will interview all of the candidates.

    This will allow comparisons when you arrive at employee selection. Make sure that part of your interview process is a formal employment application filled out by the candidate that includes permission to check references, background, and so forth.

    Notify applicants, who you are not inviting for an interview, that they will not be further considered.

    Plan and schedule second interviews with the most qualified prospects as determined by the first interview. You may begin to check references and background for these candidates during and following your second interviews.

    Check references and perform background checks. *

    You will want to begin to check references and background for these candidates during and following your second interviews. Make sure you check all claims by the candidate including educational credentials, employment history, and criminal background.

    Where possible, the best source of information is the applicant’s past managers. You will find, however, because of the fear of litigation, many employers will share only the job title, dates of employment, and occasionally, the person’s salary with you.

    That’s why managers are a significant source. You should also take a look at the candidate’s public social media profiles and postings to make sure you’re hiring the person you’ve gotten to know. LinkedIn recommendations may further solidify your choice.

    Select the most qualified person for the job. *

    If you have reached a positive decision on a candidate, following the interviews and background checks, determine the compensation you will offer the selected candidate. These are the seven most critical factors to make sure you’ve considered or done before you make the actual job offer.

    Make the job offer and notify your unsuccessful candidates. *

    Select the most qualified person for the job. Now that you’ve accomplished the first eight steps, you may make a written job offer. If reference checks are incomplete, you may make the offer contingent on the background and reference checks.

    You also need to notify the candidates who participated in job interviews but were not selected. It’s important and in your best public relations image and interests to communicate with your applicants at every step in your hiring process. It is one of the factors that affect your consideration as an employer of choice.

    Negotiate the details of salary and start date. *

    The higher the level of the job in your organization, the more likely the candidate is to negotiate compensation, paid time off, guaranteed severance pay if the relationship fails to work out, company equipment, time working remotely, and more. These individual have the most potentially to lose if they are leaving a current job and the employment relationship doesn’t work out with you.

    That said, I have had beginning employees, fresh out of college, ask for $5,000 more than they were offered. If it was within the salary range for the job (think about how you pay your current employees in similar roles) and the candidate is much preferred, consider negotiating. The two most common asks that I’ve encountered are for a higher starting salary and more paid time off. Flexibility is required. You won’t have a happy new employee if he left a job where he had three weeks paid vacation for a job that offered him one week.

    Determine if you can accommodate other requests by your prospect. The most common I’ve encountered has been a vacation scheduled within the first few months of starting. I’ve also encountered several postponed starting dates to accommodate scheduled surgery.

    Welcome your new employee. *

    How you welcome your new employee lays the groundwork for whether you will retain the employee in the future. Stay in touch with your new employee from the time she accepts the job offer until her start date. Continue to build the relationship.

    Assign a mentor, let coworkers know the employee is starting with a welcome letter, plan the new employee’s onboarding process, and make sure the employee will feel warmly welcomed during the first days of work. If you do this process effectively, you will have an excited, welcomed employee who is ready to set the world on fire.

    Are you interested in a more detailed hiring checklist?

    Recruitment 1 sq 1 300x140 1 How To Simplify Your Recruiting
    How To Simplify Your Recruiting

    We hear all the time from employers that there’s just not enough hours in the day to complete the tasks that they need of them. Plus a lot of the time, they’re wearing a lot of different hats to help the company progress in different ways and usually in shorter amounts of time.

    So a Solution to Simplify their Recruiting is always welcomed, work with our team to streamline and simplify your Recruiting and  Staffing needs.

    At the end of the day, recruiting can start to feel overwhelming. Talent Fusion can take the guesswork out of recruiting.

    We’ll work with you really closely to understand exactly who it is that you’re looking for within your organization and who you need to bring in as far as hire is concerned. We know that every single hire that you make is very important.

    What we’ll do is work with you closely to make sure that you’re getting the right level of support that you need.

    Whether it’s owning a search from sourcing to the job offer stage or simply pre-qualifying candidates to put them in front of your hiring teams, we’ll make sure that your program is customized just for you.

    Recruiting doesn’t have to be difficult. Let Complete staff Solutions help you

    Job search How To Speed Up 038 Enhance Your Job Search
    How To Speed Up & Enhance Your Job Search

    Doing a job search can also be a full-time job in itself. It is time-consuming and often hard work.

    1. Know what you want before you start a job search *

    Spend some focused time working out exactly what you want to do. Self-analysis work is a key before you put your effort in. Knowing what you want and what you are good at and enjoy will save you time, ensure you come across as focused and self-assured and it will also be helpful when asking others as they will then know to think of you when a particular opportunity arises.

    1. You do a job search in a network *

    First, build your network by reaching out to relevant people within your network. Then, learn from your network. You can seek out others within your networks’ network that you could be introduced to/speak to. Ensure that you contact senior people too; they may be more likely to have hiring power. Once people are aware of your area/needs, doors should open. Speak to people who have done well in your chosen field. Most often, people who have done well in their area and enjoy it are very happy to talk to those who are equally passionate and considering entering their area. Learn from others, speak to them about how they did it or look at their bios. If you are considering a course/some development in your area of interest, get recommendations from people who know.

    1. LinkedIn *

    Use this to its full advantage in your job search. Whilst looking for a position, you could consider joining linked in premium facility which is free for the first 30 days or look into their job seeker app. LinkedIn is a hugely powerful tool when it comes to recruiting and job change – spend time on perfecting your profile. Recruiters, headhunters and decision-makers are using it to recruit so you are missing a trick if you are not using it to its full.

    1. Agencies *

    Join them. Identify three or four recognized agencies, headhunters or job search firms that recruit the types of positions that you are looking for at the correct level of seniority. A tip on finding them…. Ask your network, think of good agencies you have used in the past for recruiting and join them. Call a few of the companies you would like to work for and see if you can find out which agencies they use – then join them. Another key tip is to build a relationship with your key recruiter and their team. If they like you they will fight for you. The relationship with them is the key in a successful job search! Like Complete Staff Solutions

    1. Build your experience *

    Once you have identified what you want build your experience in that area. This could be internally within your company, by volunteering outside of work or offering on projects. Also pick out and highlight the relevant experience that you have on your CV or LinkedIn profile.

    1. Be visible *

    Whether this is in person networking or at events and conferences or ‘on line’ joining in on discussions and in groups be visible and get out there! Explore your options and choices in doing a job search.

    1. Work on preSenting yourself *

    Interview well, have an elevator pitch, look good in person and on paper. Make sure your online presence, CV and LinkedIn profiles are impressive. Spend time on this.

    1. Match *

    Be attentive and smart in doing a job search. Match your CV and LinkedIn profile as closely as you can to the job specifications that you are looking at. Pull out the key words and relevant experience that you have.

    1. Research *

    Once you have identified a position, research and do more job research. Research the company hiring process, the person interviewing you, others who work there, the market, their presence within the market, any articles related to them. Go beyond with the job search.

    1. Follow up – Ask and re ask if you need to *

    Reach out and ask others when you do a job search. Can you help them out too in some way? Don’t be afraid to ask and talk to people. Why not approach that person at that company you have always wanted to work for and send your CV. They can always say no but they may say yes!

    1. Testimonials and recommendations *

    Ask people to write these for you on LinkedIn. People generally have to be approached and asked to do this. If you can ask for a testimonials from a 360 perspective – a boss, a colleague, a client, customer etc. Have at least six.

    1. Courses *

    Are there any courses you could complete whilst you are still working at your current company or relevant ones you could do alongside?

    1. Keep up-to-date *

    Join groups on LinkedIn, sign up to blogs relevant to your field, and prescribe for an industry relevant magazine, sign up to newsletters. Go to conferences and any relevant meet ups. Learn, read and absorb any relevant information. Sign up to Google alerts. These alerts (based on single words or phrases) will generate news articles that contain them emailed directly to your in box every day and will flag newsworthy content. Perhaps sign up with three or four relevant words. Set up Google alerts for the companies you are interested in and interviewing for. All of the above will result in you coming across more knowledgeable and up to date with market changes and they may flag information on openings competitors or help you think about the specific areas you are most interested in. Read a daily newspaper to keep you informed and up to date.

    1. Keep going and try to keep positive in your job search *

    You will be more attractive as a candidate and others will want to help you. If you feel you need it and require assistance to get from where you are to where you want to be hire a career coach. Similar to asking for personal training if you have fitness goals a career coach could provide the extra support you need in your job search.

    Industry 1 Large Project Coming Up How A Labour Hire Agency Will Take The Stress Out Of Recruitment
    Large Project Coming Up? How A Labour Hire Agency Will Take The Stress Out Of Recruitment

    You have just signed a contract for a large project. Your initial thought – how are you going to get experienced staff to help out on the project? Rather than heading to the employment pages, why not start with a labour hire agency that can help you with your business?

     Here are some tips on how a labour hire agency can help you complete your large project on time and on budget.

    Large numbers of staff

    With a large project, you will need higher numbers of staff. Once you’ve committed to provide an outcome, you need to be able to deliver and with a large project that means all hands on deck. The best place to start to find the numbers in one place is a labour hire agency. They will have plenty of people on their books with the skills you need, ready to start straight away.

    Experienced staff

    The next important factor in a big project is experienced staff. Not only do you need many hands to make light work of the project, but it’s important to have experienced and skilled staff. Labour hire agencies examine the skill sets and qualifications of staff, so that you don’t have to. They work with the people on their employee lists to make sure their skills and accreditations are up to date so that anyone they send to your site is job-ready.

    Save time and money searching

    A labour hire agency can also save time for your large project. Rather than spend hours advertising for workers, you can save the advertising dollars and put the money straight into the workers for the project. A labour hire agency can help with one phone call. Let them know what you need, when and for how long and they can gather the best staff to assist you with your project.

    Staff in the right place at the right time

    Heading to one source for workers means you get the right staff in the right place at the right time. On time delivery is crucial for large projects and is vital in ensuring budgets are met. Your labour hire agency can be a partner in this process and help you by doing all the screening, HR and insurance so that you can pour your time into your project to ensure its success.

    Do you have a large project coming up? Contact us Today for our most competitive rates from a Company who follow through and delivery not just great rates, but the assurance and confidence you”ll have the Right People, at the Right Time to help secure and service all your Projects large and small.

    Resume Tip sign 15 Resume Writing Mistakes Costing You Interviews
    15 Resume Writing Mistakes Costing You Interviews

    Your Resume is an important part of your armory when looking for a job.Avoid these 15 Resume Writing Mistakes to ensure you snare you next position.

    Your Resume has to look good and be as close as possible to the job description to get you through to the next stage. As one of the first documents that someone will ask for to represent your capabilities, your Resume should be completed with focus, time and care. Resume Writing can often be the difference between securing an interview for your jobs applied, and not making the initial cut.

    If you’re guilty of any of the Resume Writing mistakes below, you’re probably costing yourself some great interviews:

    1. Bad formatting *

    Your Resume should be formatted perfectly. It should be consistent throughout in terms of bullets, text and margins. Your Resume should be readable on a mobile device as well as on a computer screen; so ensure it displays perfectly for both. Saving it as a PDF is a great way to ensure it is easy to read on tablets and phones. There is no excuse for untidy, inconsistent formatting. Check once, and then double-check this!

    2. No contact details *

    These should be clear, correct and visible. Perhaps they could be in a header to ensure they are easy to find if the pages are not kept together.

    3. Too many pages *

    The ideal length of a Resume is two pages.

    4. Jam-packed paragraphs *

    Your Resume should be split up clearly with bullet points. HR professionals and recruiters want to read the relevant information quickly and easily, and will not waste hours reading through long scripts.

    5. Hidden information *

    Your Resume needs to match as closely as possible to the job description or job requirements. Often Resume’s are selected via key words so the words that appear on your ideal job description should also (if you have the experience) appear on your Resume.

    6. A rush-job *

    Rushing to produce a Resume without really thinking through and analyzing what it is that you want to do next. Take your time to analyse yourself; self-awareness and knowing what you want and are suited to should be your first step before producing your Resume.

    Real freedom to choose and some control over what you now want must involve some self-awareness work first. My book What to do next? is a practical exercise book which can help you with this (available on Amazon).

    7. Wordy profile statement *

    Your profile statement needs to be short, strong, snappy and not generic. They need to be objective. In one or two sentences summarise and emphasise your key attributes, experience and your intended future career path.

    8. No summary of skills *

    These should be clearly visible, don’t hide them. Some people like the top part of their Resume to look like a snap shot of your experience. Your skills should be bulleted and separated and can appear under your profile statement so the reader can quickly see them.

    9. Inconsistent, incorrect tenses *

    I often see Resumes where the starting word is in the wrong tense. If you are currently working there, it should read, for example: Reviewing, Liaising etc. If, however, it is a previous role, it should read: Reviewed, Liaised. It’s an obvious one, but I see it on almost every Resume that crosses my desk.

    Perhaps this is because people update their CV as they go, and don’t necessarily go back to change old roles.

    10. Overuse of one particular word *

    Again a regular mistake that I see. People often have one word that they repeat over and over again watch out for this, it is often the first word of your responsibility bullet points. Ask a couple of people to read through and check your Resume for you.

    11. Omitting relevant qualifications/training/courses *

    Often people miss internal training or courses that they have done in the past. List all of them.

    12. Failure to quantify things *

    A great way to add strength to your bullet points is to add numbers and percentages. What did you do, what was the outcome, can you quantify it?

    13. Unorganised bullet points *

    I prefer Resume’s that have clear bullet points for each position. They can be easily read and are clear. Even within those bullet points think about which ones are at the top. The first two bullet points position you. Think about which are most impressive or most relevant to the job you are applying to and put them first.

    14. Lack of tailoring *

    For those good important jobs that you really want make sure you tweak your Resume and pull out the most relevant experience and information that you can. Change the order of bullets, add figures. Go through the job specification and match your CV as closely as you can to it. Take time over this.

    15. No references *

    Have them. Either references on request or list the names of two individuals you have asked at the bottom of your Resume.

    Fixing these problems in your Resume will help a great deal with your job search, however, you should also make sure your social media profiles match the calibre of your Resume. Make sure your Linked In profile gets just as much attention.

    The two will work together and these days both need to be strong. Also, be careful not to use too much jargon and simplify your language where possible. Some industry jargon is necessary for keyword searches, but try to stay away from inter-company jargon all over your Resume it will only alienate the reader.

    Finally, don’t forget to do your research. Find out as much as you can about the company you’re applying for; the culture, job description, their social media presence. Try to gain a true understanding of what they are looking for before you apply.

    Decide then if that is what you want and if the answer is yes, tailor your Resume with your relevant experience and attributes to match that. Avoiding these Resume Writing Mistakes will no doubt increase your success in securing an interview for more of the jobs you want.

    Want some advice? Click to obtain a free Resume Review from one of our Recruitment Advisors and see how your Resume stacks up to our 15 Resume Writing Mistakes.

    Common Cover Letter Mistakes New Job Seekers Make sq Copy Top 10 Cover Letter Tips
    Top 10 Cover Letter Tips

    We have cover letter tips for you, so you can wow interviewers and employers. The closer to perfect your letter is, the better your chances of getting the interview. When you need to write a cover letter to apply for a job, it’s sometimes the small things that can make a big difference.

    Review these tips and techniques for writing top-notch cover letters to send with your resume, including format and presentation, advice for choosing a type of cover letter, writing custom cover letters, how to send, and examples and templates.

    1. Select the Right Type of Cover Letter *

    There are several types of cover letters that can be sent to employers and contacts. Be sure to choose a type of cover letter that reflects how you are applying for the job or the type of job search assistance you are requesting.

    Your cover letter should be designed specifically for the purpose you are writing and customized for each position you seek. Review samples of each type of cover letter, and pick the one that works best for you.

    2. Try to Find a Contact Person *

    When it comes to cover letters, taking the time to get personal is really important. Find out as much as you can about the company and the hiring manager.

    Personalize your cover letter and, if you can, address it to the individual responsible for hiring. If need be, research online or make a phone call to find out who the hiring manager is.

    3. Address Your Cover Letter Correctly *

    How to address a cover letter can be tricky. Like, say, you are responding to a blind ad. You don’t have a contact person’s name to include. You don’t know the hiring manager’s gender as well. It’s best that you use gender-neutral words then.

    4. Explore Other Cover Letter Tips and Examples *

    Take the time to review cover letter examples before you start writing your own. Make sure that your letter explains how your skills relate to the criteria listed in the job posting.

    5. Format Your Cover Letter Properly *

    How you format your cover letter, both from a content (the information you include) and a presentation (what your cover letter looks like) perspective is important.

    Even when applying online or via email, your cover letter needs to be properly formatted, readable, and without any mistakes.

    6. Include Keywords in Your Cover Letter *

    It’s important to include skill, results and recognition keywords. Make sure that these match the description of the job for which you are applying and attest to your credentials in your cover letter. These cover letter tips can increase your chances of getting selected for an interview.

    7. Write a Custom Cover Letter *

    It can be time-consuming to write a custom cover letter for each job you apply for, but it’s important to take the time. Your giving effort will show the company why you are a good match. This is actually the most important cover letter tips you can have in mind.

    8. Start From a Cover Letter Template *

    A cover letter template can be a good way to get started writing cover letters to send with resumes when you apply for jobs.

    Use a cover letter template as a starting point for creating your own personalized cover letter by adding your own information to the template.

    9. Send an Email Cover Letter That Will Get Read *

    The most important part of sending an email cover letter is to follow the employer’s instructions. If the job posting says to include your cover letter and resume as an attachment, attach Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF files to your email message.

    It’s important to send your cover letter and resume attachments correctly. Make sure to include all the information you need so your email message is read. Then, let the receiver know how they can contact you to schedule an interview. Never miss this among the cover letter tips you have known so far.

    10. Explain an Employment Gap *

    Prepare to explain when you have recent gaps in your work history. You may want to share why you have been laid-off and out of work. You can also tell that you were taking time out from the workplace to spend with your family, traveling, going back to school, or for any reason. Your cover letter gives you an opportunity to explain the employment gap.

    These are just cover letter tips you can follow to be guided. But certainly, your cover letter should mainly answer what the job post requires. To satisfy what the recruiter and employer with what they are looking for, is the most important cover letter tips you note.

    Temporary recruitment Using A Recruitment Agency For Short Term Labour
    Using A Recruitment Agency For Short Term Labour

    Both large and small businesses require temporary staff from time to time. Perhaps you’re looking for a person to fill a position for the busy season but are concerned that business might slow down at a certain point and the extra help will no longer be required.

    Or maybe your business’ needs change frequently requiring last-minute or on-call temporary employees. Short term labour provides an excellent workforce solution for these situations and other labour gap situations common to businesses dealing with changing or uncertain circumstances.

    Short term staffing use recruitment agencies Using A Recruitment Agency For Short Term Labour

    Recruitment agencies find and provide the ideal employees to suit your company’s circumstances so that you do not have to keep repeating the recruitment process every time you need a temporary employee.

    The benefits of using a recruitment agency for your temporary labour needs include:

    1. Emergency or short notice cover. Sometimes the need for an extra worker cannot be predicted beforehand or something might come up such as employee illness or injury requiring prompt replacement. This is where recruitment agencies become lifesavers. Because employment agencies have candidates who are ready and willing to take on work on short notice, you can get temporary cover for your vacant position in no time cutting on downtime and losses.
    2. Strong selection processes. Quality should never be sacrificed for quantity. This can easily happen when you are looking for a large number of temporary employees to fill several positions. Luckily, recruitment agencies offer both quantity and quality. As a result of the large number of job seekers registered with recruitment agencies and their strong selection processes, your business will get access to a large number of high-calibre temporary workers within a short time. The selection process used by recruitment agencies helps to match job seekers with job opportunities based on the information and criteria submitted by both parties.
    3. Network. Recruitment firms have a larger network of available workers than any employer could have. For an employer looking to hire a temporary worker, you would need to advertise the job opening, interview candidates and then process new hire documents for a relatively short employment period. A staffing agency on the other hand keeps relationships with workers that they have already identified as reliable, dependable, and conscientious and can fill a vacant position in a matter of days, or even hours. The network maintained by staffing firms is a broad one from which they can get capable employees to fill any position you might have or anticipate.
    4. Cost. By using a recruitment agency, you will be able to lower the costs associated with staff recruitment. Because staffing agencies take care of the entire employment process, they will relieve you of recruitment costs such as CV evaluation, pre-employment testing, drug screening and background investigations. In addition, you will be able to save money on costs related to payroll processing and administration for your temporary staff as this will be handled by the recruitment agency. By using a recruitment firm for your labour needs you will get access to qualified workers at a fraction of the cost.
    5. Knowledge of the market. Great recruitment agencies have their finger on the pulse of their specialist markets and will therefore be able to give your HR department insight into what is going on. They know the available talent, where they are situated and how to reach them. They also have an understanding of the current hiring complexities, available skill-sets and the current salary rates. If other companies are struggling to find the same worker as you, they will offer advice on viable alternatives. A good recruitment agency acts as collaborator and partner while still being your eyes and ears in the labour market. The knowledge recruitment agencies posess will ensure that you get the right person to fill your current labour gap regardless of the prevailing market conditions.

    A recruitment agency acts as a one-stop shop for all your labour needs. Regardless of the position you need filling, you can be certain that the recruitment agency will provide a qualified person within the shortest time possible.

    At Complete Staff Solutions, we strive to provide the best quality labour hire for our clients. That is why we thoroughly vet all candidates and follow up on employee progress even after placement.

    We believe in our ability to successfully match employees with employers so much that we’ll not charge you if you are unsatisfied with a worker within the first 8 hours of hire.

    Contact us Using A Recruitment Agency For Short Term LabourPermanent placement 150x150 Using A Recruitment Agency For Short Term LabourTemporary recruitment 150x150 Using A Recruitment Agency For Short Term Labour

    AFFILIATES & COMPLETE STAFF’S SUPPLIERS *

    All recruitment australia Using A Recruitment Agency For Short Term Labour

    Cseo logo Using A Recruitment Agency For Short Term Labour

     

     

     

     

    Hired Qualifications Will Get You An Interview But They Won 8217 t Get You Hired
    Qualifications Will Get You An Interview, But They Won’t Get You Hired

    Anyone who has ever gone through job search will likely be able to tell you about at least one interview they aced, only to find that the company “went in another direction” when it came time to select their new employee.

    This phenomenon is quite common – dark horse candidates get chosen all the time – but those who get the short straw in this situation nevertheless continue to be amazed and bewildered by the experience.

    Why did they hire him??? I’m far more qualified than he is!”

    Evidently, the manager saw him as a better fit for their organization.

    But I’ve got everything they asked for in the job posting! The other guy doesn’t!”

    There’s more to it than that.

    He doesn’t have the industry experience that I have, either! I don’t get it!”

    It isn’t that simple.

    It doesn’t need to be so perplexing. If you clearly understand the various phases of the interview process and their corresponding focus, you can close the deal successfully. With each phase you mis-read, on the other hand, the likelihood increases of your ultimately being rejected.

    Overview of the process: *

     

     

     

     

     Many job seekers grasp the fact that the interview is in fact a sales pitch. For any sales meeting to end successfully, the salesman must know intimately all the features and functions of the product he is selling. In this case, you are both the salesman and the product. Simply stated, then, you must be able to articulate your value as an employee.

    Of course, it doesn’t stop there. No matter how good it is, the customer isn’t going to buy your product if they don’t need it. That means that you must also know the needs of the buyer (in this case, the hiring manager). Research, then (via the company website, web searches, networking connections, etc), is invaluable. Anything which gives insight into identifying pain points for the company can provide you with an opportunity to sell a solution.

    The final step is to connect the dots. Show the interviewer how your skills match with their needs. Don’t make them work to see the connection, but spell it out for them through an impactful and compelling narrative. That’s when the buyer will be motivated to make the purchase (or to hire you).

    But I did all of that!”

    Wait, that’s just the overview. You may not have done this as effectively as you think. There are distinctly different phases to this process.

    Phase 1 – Qualifications: *

    In order for you to get the interview in the first place, you had to convince the pre-screener that you possess the skills for the job. You likely spent significant time working on your resume, crafting engaging accomplishment stories to highlight the moments in your work history when you really made a difference. No doubt your networking conversations also highlighted these skills.

    In most cases, the opening phase of the interview process will similarly be focused on these same qualifications. That means that the interviewer’s questions are likely going to deal with your education, work experience and hard skills.

    In simple terms, they want to know that you can do the job. The better you can demonstrate your abilities, the more impressed the hiring manager will be. This is where all the work you did on those accomplishment stories will pay off: the details (and especially the measurable results you achieved) are critically important, so share them confidently.

    You’re preaching to the choir. I did that, and did it very well. Why didn’t I get the job?”

    Because that was only phase I.

    Phase 2 – Passion: *

    The hiring manager wants more than your abilities; they want your passion, too. If all you want is a paycheck, you’re not likely to inspire confidence that you’ll be truly engaged and productive on the job. Thus, the interviewer is looking for assurances that you love what you do.

    The manager wants an employee who wants to work for their company, so you can expect a change in the type of questions you’ll be asked. You’ll hear things like “Why did you get into this line of work?”, “Why do you want to work for our company?”, “What do you like most about your job?”and so on.

    Did you notice the change in focus reflected in those questions?

    Umm …”

    When asked about your passion, if you answer by citing your skillset, education and work experience, you may miss the mark completely. Although you could still be quite diligent in connecting conversational dots, you’re likely not connecting the right ones. Another great accomplishment story here isn’t going to impress if it doesn’t address the question which was posed to you.

    Oh. So if I make sure that I sell my passion, I’ll get the job?”

    It’s a step in the right direction, but we’re not quite there yet. There’s still one phase left.

    Phase 3 – Cultural fit: *

    No matter how qualified and passionate you are, you won’t get hired if you don’t fit in with the team. Someone who’s disruptive to departmental cohesion isn’t worth bringing into the fold, even if he’s excellent at his job.No problem. I’m a nice guy. This should be easy.”

    Hang on. We’re not talking about something so simple as whether or not you’re a jerk. Team chemistry is more complex than that. People who are otherwise good employees often “just don’t fit in” to a particular departmental or company culture. And there could just as easily be friction between your style and your manager’s, too. No one is necessarily the bad guy when that happens; it’s just not a good match.

    The manager will want to know that you’ll be a good complement to the team before making the decision to hire you, so selling the fit is critically important. Most managers have experienced, first hand, what happens when a disruptive employee is brought on board, and they’re accordingly cautious about avoiding a repeat of the experience.

    Before you can sell a good fit, though, you’ll first need to identify whether or not one exists. That means engaging in a dialogue about the manager’s style and the departmental culture. Asking the manager questions like “How do things get done around here?”, “What soft skills are valued?”, “How would you describe your leadership style?” and “Can you describe a typical day and how you and I would interact?” will help to uncover elements of fit. Once the chemistry is thus clearly defined, showing genuine enthusiasm for the team culture is a great way to convince the manager that you’d be a great addition.

    See the Big Picture: In order to truly ace the interview, you must be sensitive to the change in focus as reflected in the type of questions you’ll be asked. Be alert to whether you’re being asked about your qualifications, your passion or the matter of fit, and target your responses accordingly.

    It all boils down to this: the hiring manager wants to know that you can do the job, but he also needs to be able to picture himself having coffee with you on Monday morning. He’s going to be spending 40 or more hours with you each week, and he doesn’t want to do that with someone he doesn’t like. Qualifications, then, are what will get you the interview, but it’s rapport that will get you hired.

    Mythsbfacts Top 5 Job Agency Myths Debunked
    Top 5 Job Agency Myths Debunked!

    Whether you’re looking to fill a vacancy in your business or you’re a job hunter, don’t underestimate the power of a job agency company!

    These agencies have come a long way since the days of administering typing tests and only placing “secretaries” in temporary positions. In fact, there’s a big difference between a job agency and a temp agency – sometimes they’re one in the same, but have different departments, but for the most part, they’re commonly misidentified as the same thing.

    A job agency is often employed by the largest corporations because they have the skills, networks, and ability to pinpoint the best candidates for the position — and then secure them. However, there are countless rumors swirling about recruitment agencies and some have been around for decades. If you’re in the position of needing to match the perfect candidate to the perfect job, it’s worth taking a closer look at these agencies.

    Here are some of the most common myths about job agencies and why you need to dig deeper.

    1) “I can recruit myself…” *

    You certainly can recruit candidates yourself, but have you ever wondered why even enterprises with huge HR departments still work with job agencies? You can get tunnel vision, you have the same network, and it takes a lot of manpower to recruit. Improve your efforts and get more quality candidates quicker.

    Recruiting takes two things companies don’t have in excess: A lot of time and specialized skills to dedicate toward just one vacancy. Even if you have an amazing recruitment team and/or HR department, they can’t dedicate the equivalency of a full-time job to filling each vacancy that comes up. A job agency, on the other hand, can.

    2) “They don’t specialize in my industry…” *

    Actually, you probably can find a job agency in your field and if not, these agencies often cast a wide net and can work wonders whether you’re an SEO professional or a dog groomer. For job seekers, including recent grads like Marie Faulkner, agencies got them a great job when their own efforts failed. She says:

    “Working with the consultants at the agency has given me two extremely good opportunities to work for some of the most influential organizations” *
    …and that’s as a freshly minted grad. *

    As more and more “niche jobs” become standardized, job agencies have kept pace. If you’re looking to fill a very specific type of job, a niche job agency might be a better choice. However, it’s worth checking out if an agency has a specialist of department that focuses on what you’re looking for. You might be surprised by what you find.

    3) “They take a huge commission…” *

    Obviously recruiters get paid for what they do, and if you want the best job agency on your side, that’s going to cost you. However, for candidates, it’s totally free and the only person paying is the company that needs to fill a position. Break down the cost-benefit analysis, and ask yourself what the best workers are really worth. In the long run, those commissions aren’t as costly as you think.

    Time is taken out for background checks and interviews all add up quickly. In the grand scheme of things, it can cost several thousand dollars to hire a new recruit, so the commissions of agents are actually pretty comparable.

    4) “They don’t work…” *

    A recruiter isn’t a magician, and if you don’t put in the effort then even the best agency in the world isn’t going to make a match. If you’re a job seeker, you can still bomb interviews or otherwise turn off an employer. As an employer, maybe you don’t really know what you’re looking for or your hiring team has a penchant for not making the best matches.

    However, a good job agency will know if you’re really ready to fill a vacancy or not. If you’re not, then they’ll let you know steps that should be taken before they’ll accept the task. A recruiter wants the same thing you do: the perfect fit for the position, and they won’t compromise just to make a quick fee. Everyone should be happy with the result as this is a symbiotic relationship.

    5) “They’re too time-consuming…” *

    A recruiter can’t do all the work for you, and job seekers certainly have to complete profiles, go on interviews and work with the recruiter. There’s a lot of paperwork on the employer’s side as well. However, agencies streamline these processes. After all, it would be a lot more work to do this solo.

    However, that’s like comparing making cookies from scratch vs. making them with pre-made dough. As long as the pre-made dough is high quality, it just speeds things up even though there’s a little work involved form your side.
    Is a recruiter your magic bullet? Not necessarily, but a job agency can certainly put you on the fast track to successful recruitment.

    AFFILIATES & COMPLETE STAFF’S SUPPLIERS *

    All recruitment australia Top 5 Job Agency Myths Debunked

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    Jobs Jobseeker Tips 8211 Find A Job
    Jobseeker Tips – Find A Job

    NEED TO FIND JOB? TOP TIPS FOR JOB SEEKERS *

    Looking for an Available Job? Labour Hire Agencies are likely your key!!! Whether you are a seasoned worker looking for a career change or trying to find a job for the first time, there are a number of things you can do to improve your prospects. Read on to find out how to put your best foot forward in your search for employment!

    Know your industry *

    In today’s competitive workplace, it’s important to know exactly what a potential employer is looking for when hiring so that you can stand out among the other job seekers. What skills are they looking for, for example? Are your skills current and up to date or could it be wise to do a refresher course? Courses through registered training organisations are always looked upon favorably, and can be a great way for those entering a new industry to gain practical experience so they are ready to hit the ground running in a new placement. Of course, some trades involve specific on the job training instead, which is why it’s so important to do your research before putting in an application.

    For Job Seekers

    A resume for success *

    When you are job searching, first impressions count. Your resume, and accompanying cover letter, will be your introduction to any potential employer and it’s imperative to get it right. A poorly edited resume tells your potential employer that you lack attention to detail. You may consider using a professional resume company, or simply ask someone to proofread your work for you before submission. Good spelling and grammar, along with a clear, readable format are a great start.

    If you are required to address selection criteria, make sure it is specific to the job. A generic resume handed out to multiple businesses is not going to impress your future employer. They want to hear why you are the perfect candidate for the specific position advertised, and how your skills match what they are looking for in an employee.

    Importantly, be genuine. Consider what traits make you an asset to your current position and how they can be utilised in your new role.

    Register Online

    Applying for jobs *

    There is a multitude of platforms available to assist you in your search to find a job. Newspapers, community boards, online job seeker websites, and even social media groups advertise regularly for a range of different industries on behalf of businesses.

    Another avenue to consider is a labour hire services company. Specialising in both short and long term employment solutions, the labour hire firm employs people who are looking for work directly and sends them out on regular assignments with clients looking for a trained worker to fill an employment vacancy. The benefits for job seekers is regular work in a variety of industries, with training, wages, insurance, and support offered by the labour company rather than the business.

    If you’re trying to find a job, you need to put your best foot forward by researching your industry, keeping your skills current, and utilising the services of professionals to help you move forward to your dream career!

    Like this post? Share it on Facebook! Refer to a friend who registers and get a Free RESUME review.

    Recruitment service 500x500 sq 300x153 1 What Is The Future Of Work Agencies
    What Is The Future Of Work Agencies?

    I’ve written a few blogs for Complete Staff Solution on how companies can reduce their agency spend by focusing on direct hires instead of work agencies. From speaking to other HR types and recruitment consultants that I work with, it’s an increasing trend. Social media, especially LinkedIn, is making it easier than ever for organisations to source their own talent.

    ‘Hollowing out’ work *

    Direct sourcing is only one aspect of recruitment, and the world of work generally, that is changing. I recently attended the London Business School Future of Work Consortium, focusing on the future of talent. ‘Hollowing out’ of work is one of the key trends we will increasingly face over the next decade or so. For years now we have been outsourcing work to the developing world. The trend is replacing lots of work previously done by people with machines and computers.

    As this trend continues, we will end up with a labour market with a big gap in the middle. The result will be lots of highly specialized work, for which there is predicted to be a shortage of suitable candidates, and lots of low skilled work which needs to be done by people, such as care work.

    Other trends for work agencies *

    Other trends will also impact recruitment: changing demography, increased globalization and continuously increasing technology. Talent will also become more distributed as technology will mean your location is no longer a barrier to you doing certain types of work. Middle manager will apparently become an endangered species.

    From a recruitment perspective, this war for talent people have talked of for years. This is predicted to become real in the not too distant future.

    What does this mean for the future of recruitment and work agencies? *

    Recruiters are going to have to be agile. The old methods of attracting people to your organisations just won’t cut it in the future. We may well need to create our own talent by engaging those leaving education and investing significantly in their careers through learning and development.

    Employer brand will become increasingly important, as will taking into account as part of your EVP the needs of five generations in the workplace.

    If you want to attract and retain the best, you carefully consider and improve your offered benefits.

    With regard to work agencies, they will also need to adapt to this changing environment. All of these factors will significantly impact their traditional operating model. At the same time, it may also present significant opportunity for those who are looking to the future.

    The demand for low skill work means that there still will be a need for temporary agencies supplying short term labour. This might be sending in warehouse staff to cope with temporary demand, or sending a temp receptionist for holiday cover, but these work agencies can survive the future of recruitment. The predicted demand for highly skilled workers presents a real opportunity for work agencies operating at the senior end, as well as retained search. These workers will be able to demand a premium in the future and will be highly sought after.

    Jobs Jobsearch Australia 8 Ways To Measure Job Search Success
    Jobsearch Australia 8 Ways To Measure Job Search Success

    Whether you’ve been job searching for one month or over nine months, now is the time to diagnose what’s working and what isn’t working in your job search. As the saying goes, if your phone isn’t ringing, what you are doing isn’t working.

    Jobsearch Australia 8 Ways To Measure Job Search Success The ultimate measure of your success in a job search is a job offer. However, in order to reach this goal, you have to take the right actions and track your outcomes. It’s hard to know how to adjust your job search if you don’t know what works for you. So why aren’t you landing a job when you’ve been applying to hundreds of them online?

    Try asking yourself these questions and begin tracking your job search metrics.

    Where are you finding job leads? Job boards seem the most likely spot to find job leads, but by the time a job is posted on a job board, it has been circulating inside the company. Internal candidates have thrown their resumes in the pile and employees have been telling friends and family about the job. If you only use job boards, you’re arriving in the party too late. To proactively search for a job, create a list of 20 or more potential employers. These are companies who hire for the types of jobs you are interested in. Use your list and monitor the company career pages for similar jobs.

    How many jobs did you apply to? Sending the same resume and generic cover letter to job postings is so 1980s. Your job search strategy is going to require planning and communicating a clear and customized message for every job or company you are interested in. It is a blend of quantity and quality which means you will need to develop a system for personalizing each and every application.

    How many jobs did you think you would be a great fit for? Employers are selecting the best candidates, meaning candidates that match most of the job requirements. Do you? A general rule of thumb is to apply when you meet more than 60 percent of the requirements.

    Did you follow up after you applied? When you made follow up calls, did you make contact with a live person or did you just leave a voicemail message? Or did you take the easy route and send an email? You want to make the extra effort and do everything possible to make live contact with the hiring manager, not human resources. The hiring manager has the power to hire you, so you want your qualifications and interest to come across.

    How many people do you know inside your target companies? Referred candidates are far more likely to receive an interview and are also more likely to receive a job offer. You want to be the first one to know about a new job opportunity. Company insiders can provide you with this intelligence. The more people you know inside companies you want to work for, the more likely you can submit your qualifications early when there isn’t as much competition. This is why networking is so important. When you find a job you are interested in, reach out to everyone in your network and ask if they know anyone who works at that company. But it isn’t uncommon to find you don’t know anyone. Don’t give up. Use LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook to find a contact to reach out to.

    How many new people did you meet last week? It would be great if you knew everyone you needed to. But the truth is, you need to meet new people every week and expand your network. Focus your attention and effort in meeting people who work inside your target companies. Keep in mind, you’ll have better success doing this if you use a common connection to help facilitate the introduction. Once you’ve met someone, always follow up with a thank you message. Another way to meet new people is to attend professional association meetings, conferences or meetups. And remember to stay in touch.

    How many people did you re-connect with last week? Your network requires attention. In order to sustain the relationships you’ve made, both in the past and recently, you want to keep in touch with past colleagues and people you’ve met. Develop a system for reaching out every one to two months with people in your network, especially those inside target companies.

    How many phone screening calls have you had as a result of submitting for a job? Not every application will convert into a phone screen. However, if no one is calling and you’ve applied to many jobs, the problem is with your resume. Make sure you address as many of the job requirements as truthfully possible.

    At Complete Staff Solution’s our Recruitment Specialists are not only local but we all take a genuine interest in your physical and mental fit for our client, securing you years of comfort and success in your new role.

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    Sell yourself in job interview Interview Tip How To Sell Yourself At A Job Interview
    Interview Tip: How To Sell Yourself At A Job Interview

    If you are looking to get back in the workforce or feel now is the time to switch jobs, it is important to polish up your interviewing skills to put yourself in the best position possible to attain what job you want.

    When going on your interview, your appearance and means of communication with your interviewer are just as important if not more so as to what resides on your resume.

    It is important for those interviewing for a position to focus in on their non-verbal means of communication so they don’t slip up. Remember, your non-verbal communications can kill or deliver the results you want.

    Be Prepared and Focused: *

    When you first meet and greet your interviewer, do you make good eye contact and deliver a firm handshake? If not, you could lose points right off the bat, leaving you to have to play catch up over the course of the interview.

    Some other missteps that can doom an interview include not smiling, appearing unusually nervous, demonstrating bad posture, bad wardrobe or grooming and being animated when asked simple questions. Oh, this seems like a no-brainer, but don’t be late for your interview; you’d be amazed what message a little tardiness (non-emergency) can mean to an employer before you even sit down for a one-on-one chat.

    A good way to avoid many if not these mistakes is by doing a practice interview the night before in front of family, friends and/or a mirror. While you don’t want to come across as too rehearsed, a little practice never hurt anyone. This also holds true with getting to your interview on time. It never hurts to do a practice run so you know the exact location of the interview and about how long it will take to get there.

    Mind Your Body Language: *

    When it comes to starting the meeting, be sure to maintain good eye contact with the person interviewing you. By being focused on your interviewer, you’re engaged in the discussion and interested in what the company may be able to offer you; staring past the interviewer is surely not sending a good signal.

    While not talking over or continuously interrupting your interviewer, it is to be expected that you will have some questions regarding the company, so prepare them ahead of time. This allows you to come ready to learn about the position you’re applying for, how your role will impact the employer and what the company can do for you.

    Don’t Put Salary at the Forefront: *

    One question that should not be at the forefront of your list is how much money the job will pay, as nothing looks worse than if you’re only interested in the salary. While it is only natural to want to know what your income will be with your new employer, don’t be overly aggressive in getting to that issue.

    Finally, the reason you’re on an interview in the first place is that you either lost your last job or are looking to switch jobs. With either being the case, do not talk bad about your former or present employer.

    Don’t Burn any Bridges: *

    The last thing an individual should do is burn bridges with a former or present boss. Doing so can have a negative impact going forward on your career, not to mention come across to a potential employer as negative and one reason not to hire you.

    When you go on a job interview – the bottom line is simple – Sell, sell and sell yourself.

    Temp Contractors Labour Hire Servicves Copy 1 Active Vs Passive Candidates Recruiting On Baseless Merit
    Active Vs. Passive Candidates: Recruiting On Baseless Merit

    Here’s a topic that’s near and dear to my heart: recruiters’ and employers’ preference of sourcing and hiring passive (non-job-seeking) candidates over active (job-seeking) candidates, and discrimination against the unemployed or anyone seeking employment.

    Sixteen years ago, I worked for a New York City ad agency that was sold to a larger company and, along with many other employees, I was laid off. As I began to embark upon my new job search, 9/11 happened, leaving the city and much of the country in a deep recession. I tried to look on the bright side – certainly there were people who were dealing with much worse than I was. But nevertheless, I was unemployed, and unfortunately stayed that way for many months after.

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    When I eventually reentered the workforce in the recruiting industry, I soon discovered what could have been one of the contributing factors to my long stretch of unemployment. Many recruiting firms often sell clients on the fact that they only recruit passive candidates, and many employers simply demand it. Over the next several years, I worked job searches for clients who would only hire candidates who were already employed. I sourced candidates for recruiters who wouldn’t even consider them if they weren’t currently working, even for positions that had gone unfilled for long periods due to their specialized skill requirements. And through it all, I wondered…am I now contributing to the same cycle of unemployment that I had been caught in a few years ago?

    Discrimination based on employment status is nothing new in the recruiting world. Recently, it became enough of an issue for states like New Jersey, Oregon and Washington, D.C. to pass laws outlawing it. But in most states, employment status is not a protected class. Even if it were, how many unemployed workers have the time, money or drive to pursue a lawsuit against a potential employer who insists on hiring passive candidates? How would they even prove that their state of unemployment affected the employer’s decision not to interview them? And assuming they could, let’s not overlook how a legal victory in their favor would affect their future job search.

    The perception *

    In the working world, there are many perceptions that are held so tightly that they often take years, even decades, to break. One of those is the perceived notion that passive candidates are superior to active candidates. Active candidates are desperate, and there must be some deep-rooted reason why they’re unemployed. If they had the skills and drive to be successfully employed, they already would be. If they were willing to work hard, they would have channeled that passion into their job search. Passive candidates are comfortably employed because they deserve to be. Luring them away from their current employer with a better salary and benefits will certainly result in a better hire than someone who is willing to accept anything. Unfortunately, none of these are true.

    The reality *

    Have you ever known a good employee to lose his or her job? Have you ever worked with a bad employee? Of course! Everyone who has held a job can answer “yes” to both of these. So what makes so many recruiters and hiring managers associate “employed” with “better employee” and “unemployed” with “lesser employee?” Certainly there are occasional cases of employees losing their jobs by their own fault, then not being able to get rehired for good reason. But there are far more excellent employees who have lost their jobs by no fault of their own, and are willing to do whatever is necessary to reenter the workforce and prove themselves.

    Any recruiter or hiring manager who disqualifies candidates based only on employment status without taking into account previous work experience, education, skill set, personality, drive and determination is doing their employer a huge disservice. Substituting any or all of these qualities with the simple requirement of being currently employed is a quick and easy path to a bad hire, thus forcing the employer to start the search process over again from square one. Furthermore, only considering passive candidates increases the chances of hiring job hoppers, who are only interested in salary and perks, and will jump ship again as soon as a better offer comes along. Active candidates are far less likely to take a job offer for granted, and more likely to work that much harder to impact the company, enhance their skill set, assimilate into the company culture, and prove their worth to the employer who was willing to give them a second chance.

    There are few employees who are lucky enough to retire without ever having experienced a day of unemployment. Those of us who have been unemployed know that if every employer only hired passive candidates, a layoff or termination would mean the end of one’s career and a bleak financial future. It’s therefore up to recruiters to consider both active and passive candidates for job searches, and to educate clients on the benefits of recruiting based on skills, experience and culture fit as opposed to employment status. After all, the more active candidates that rejoin the workforce, the more passive candidates that will exist for the next job search!

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    Related *

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    https://www.completestaff.com.au/recruiting-on-baseless-merit/
    .

    Why hire you Copy Interview Question How To Answer 8216 Why Should We Hire You 8217
    Interview Question How To Answer ‘Why Should We Hire You?’

    This common interview question can feel like a smack in the face. It can catch you off guard, put you on the spot and make you feel exceedingly uncomfortable. Think about why the recruiter is asking this interview question. Essentially, he is saying: “Why should we choose you over other candidates?” Or: “What do you bring to the table that other applicants do not?”

    These questions are not easy questions to answer. After all, you probably don’t know who the competing candidates are or what their qualifications are. You have to make your best guess based on current and past experiences and what you know of colleagues in your field.

    Whichever approach you use to answer this question, keep your response positive. There is no need to even mention other candidates and what you imagine their backgrounds to be. That can be a major turnoff to an employer, because you’re making assumptions, and it makes you sound negative.

    Given that, how can you move away from dumbstruck to deliver a clever response? *

    Focus on a problem you know or imagine the employer has. You only want to do this if you’re pretty certain you can help with it if you were to be hired. For example, if you know the company is trying to sell products within a new market segment – health care, for example – and you have experience in that industry, emphasize your expert knowledge of the industry, key players and that you can leverage your contacts to help them grow this part of their business.

    You can also be more general if you have trouble coming up with something that tangible. If you created a spreadsheet or database to log information at one of your jobs, and it saved colleagues a lot of time, this shows you have an ability to recognize issues and solve them.

    Beyond giving the example, tell them why you enjoy and are good at devising creative solutions to business problems. Don’t make them infer that you’d do that at their office too – tell them they would benefit from this skill!

    Describe what makes you unique. Think about what your colleagues say about you. Maybe you’re the go-to person for certain types of work or seen as an expert in a particular area. Share this information with confidence, and offer a specific example to demonstrate why you are viewed this way.

    When you give them an example, you’re showing employers how you could apply this characteristic to a similar situation in their firms. It gives them situational context rather than just a statement to go on.

    Discuss your track record. If you choose this route, you don’t want to pose as a braggart. The goal here is to relate how a specific thing you’ve done proves that you can achieve the company’s goals.

    Perhaps you’ve improved customer service levels and enabled your current company to retain and build its customer base. Tell the interviewer about this accomplishment in detail, and add that you can do the same for his company. Make sure the example you choose relates to a goal the prospective employer might have.

    Showcase your qualifications. While specific examples from the workplace are best, emphasizing qualifications can help you stand out if you are in a market where you know the qualifications they seek are lacking.

    For example, the company may have listed in the job description or stated during the interview that it prefers someone with a master’s degree for the role. Don’t just say you have a master’s and that you know it’s hard to find in this geographical area. Tell them how you’ve applied knowledge from your degree in a work setting or how you will be able to do so in this specific role. This shows you are forward-thinking and focused on contributing your knowledge to improve the company’s operations.

    Prepping for this question ahead of time will help you be less surprised when it pops up in an interview. Remember to focus on specific examples and emphasize how you’d use your background or qualifications in this new setting to help the company achieve its goals.

    Avoid comparing yourself to others, and focus on what benefits you offer. This will help keep your answer positive. You want to present yourself as a confident, motivated candidate, and the way to do that is to share what you can do, rather than what you think your competition can or cannot do. That, after all, is why they should hire you.

    Hopefully these interview tips helpful in your career.

    Top 10 sq 1 Top 10 Job Interview Tips And Tricks
    Top 10 Job Interview Tips And Tricks

    Do you know how to sell yourself in an interview? Have you found yourself freezing up? Have you ever had a question where you have not been able to work out what the interviewer was asking – or you could give an answer, but didn’t know if it was the right one? Here are top 10 interview tips for this month. As someone said on Twitter, these are not rocket science, but timely reminders of the basics:

    1) Research the organization: *

    Everyone gets nervous in an interview. It’s a big occasion and you should be nervous. However, if you start with some thorough research, you start to build a case in your own mind of why you should be sitting in that interview room or in front of a panel. Having some confidence is a solid first step to overcoming nerves.

    You can tell a lot about an employer from the employment pages of their website. Things such as the values they have, how easy it is to find out about potential jobs and their responses to you when you apply, can all tell you about the way they handle their recruitment.

    This in turn may reflect what it’s like to work there. If it’s friendly and easy to apply for a job, then chances are they have given some thought to why you would want to work for them.

    The web is a such wealth of facts, but what you need to do, is turn this into information. You can look at annual reports, media releases and product and service information. Online directories have company information and Google indexes the latest media news and references from other sources.

    If a career page has an email contact for an employee, and invites contact, then do it. Often companies will use testimonials that way to attract new people. Use sites such as LinkedIn to research companies.

    When you look for this information, you are not just looking for a set of unrelated facts. You should be looking for reasons that you want to work for that employer.

    You’ll really impress the interviewer if you find some simple yet compelling reasons as to why you want to work for the employer and what appeals to you about the role.

    2) Research the role: *

    One thing that constantly surprises me is that how few people really have any understanding of the role that they are applying for. Job advertisements are partly to blame for this. They are often misleading.

    The person writing the advert is often not the person that you’ll be reporting to. Things always sound different on paper compared to what you will be doing in the role.

    One of my clients recently applied for a job in the public sector. The position description said:

    Building effective communication strategies with a variety of stakeholders and colleagues to ensure information exchanges are timely, accurate and useful.

    This is what this statement meant:

    Providing advice to staff and students on the status of their research applications.

    If you see something like the above, try to talk to someone who knows about the role. A good question to ask is “what does a typical day or week look like?” Once you know what’s expected of you, preparing for the interview is instantly easier.

    Also important is a real insight into the role and the recruitment process. Dig deeper than the advertisement. Put a call through if a contact number is provided. You can find out which of the skills that the employer requires are the priority.

    You can determine what you can do without and importantly you can start to make yourself known (in a good way) to your future employer. Even if the advertisement doesn’t invite it, you can still contact the recruiter. If there are no contact details, be scrupulously polite, it usually means the employers are expecting a deluge of applications.

    Ask them questions about the recruitment process, what the steps are, how long each step takes, and whether they’ve had many applicants. You’d be surprised at the information you’ll receive if you sound polite and interested.

    3) Research yourself: *

    Employers want you to be self-aware. Have a long hard look at what you have achieved, the way you have achieved that result and the skills you developed or demonstrated along the way.

    This type of reflection helps you understand your strengths. It gives you confidence and helps you overcome nerves.

    4) Interviewer insight: *

    No two interview processes are the same. Depending on the organization and the role, you could be interviewed by a recruitment consultant, the HR department, the line manager, all three individually, or any combination.

    Each will have a different agenda for the interview. This is important to remember as your approach with each should be slightly different.

    The recruitment consultant is always the first screener. Their role is to match you to the employer’s requirements and sell you as an applicant. The consultant establishes their credibility with each good candidate they put forward to the employer.

    Take time to woo them, even if you think they don’t know their stuff (as is a common criticism). Their role is essentially a sales one: to sell you the job and, if they believe you are right for the role, to sell you to their client. Make the consultant’s role easier by focusing on your strengths and achievements and point out why you are a good match.

    The HR consultant is usually the recruitment procedural expert. One of their jobs is to ensure the organization meets its legal requirements. They often set up the recruitment process and have a strong attachment to ensuring it is working. It’s a safe bet that you will face a more structured interview from them, than you will from a line manager.

    They are often the employer’s first screener and may need to sell you further, depending on their position and influence within the organization.

    The line manager will be the person who is most concerned about finding someone for the role. They may be a person down or not meeting their organization’s objectives by being understaffed. In the interview, it will be the line manager who has the greatest sense of urgency about filling the role.

    Focus on your workplace achievements when fielding their questions. Work hard to build rapport with them. They will be assessing your fit for their team.

    It may sound obvious but treat each interviewer as if they don’t talk to each other and know anything about you. You’d be amazed at how little communication sometimes goes on between each party.

    5) Practice: *

    Most organizations now use behavioral questions – which means they will be expecting you to provide specific examples of where you have demonstrated the skill they are seeking.

    I strongly suggest practicing for an interview and seeking professional help. A professional is skilled at drawing examples out of you and finessing the ones you already have. However never memorize your lines as you can never predict all the recruiters will ask.

    Memorizing answers will make you stressed in the interview if you can’t recall what you want to say. Worse, you may even not be answering the questions the interviewer asks.

    6) Build rapport: *

    Be friendly. People like that!

    One of the best ways to relax is to assume the interviewer is on your side. Good interviewers are not interested in tripping you up. In fact, most of them are on your side, or are at the very least they will be approaching the interview in a professional manner. It may even help to you to relax if you think of the interviewer as someone who wants you to do your best

    7) Give yourself time: *

    Leave plenty of time to get to the interview. Rushing breeds panic. No matter what excuse you have, tardiness is noted. It creates a negative impression and it puts you behind immediately. Allowing waiting time for an interview gives you time to compose yourself, gather your thoughts and be mentally prepared.

    8) Please be yourself: *

    Be yourself. You will be doing yourself no favors if you try and suppress your personality, or pretend to be something that you aren’t.

    9) Relax: *

    While you think this may be the perfect job for you, it may be not. There are other jobs out there. If you keep this in mind then you’ll remove some pressure from yourself that this is your only chance to perform.

    If you think the interview is going badly, relax and use it as practice for the next one. You never know, you could even recover if you take this approach.

    10) An insider’s tip: *

    The interview is just the formal means of assessing your suitability as a candidate. However, you are not just assessed there. Each interaction you have with your future employer feeds into the bigger picture of their impression of you.

    Use this knowledge. Be polite and friendly with whomever you meet in the process from the very first phone call to the last goodbye to the receptionist on your way out.

    Interviews can be daunting. Here’s another blatant plug. When it comes to interviewing skills, practice with a professional does make perfect. These are just a few interview tips that can help you land the job you want.

    Recruitment push button How Recruiters And Ai Will Work Together
    How Recruiters And Ai Will Work Together
    Contents

    As technology evolves, artificial intelligence is quickly becoming mainstream in the recruiting world. Whether it’s sorting through high volumes of resumes, analyzing facial expressions in a video interview, or scanning social media profiles, AI is quickly becoming more of an industry standard. Artificial intelligence is simply cutting down time-consuming work, especially repetitive high-volume tasks that can take up hours of a recruiter’s time.

    Because AI has the ability to grow to be more effective over time, some recruiters are viewing it as a threat to their jobs, but this technology can only make recruiters’ lives easier by taking out dreaded, tedious work.

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    Did you know manually screening resumes is still the most time-consuming part of recruiting especially when 75% to 88% of the resumes received for a role are unqualified?

    Screening resumes efficiently and effectively is still one of the biggest challenges for recruiters. AI is designed to reduce and eventually remove low-level sourcing activities like manually screening resumes. 56% of talent acquisition leaders say their hiring volume will increase next year, but their recruiting teams will most likely remain the same size or shrink.

    As AI expands in the recruiting world, talent acquisition pros will be expected to become more efficient by “doing more with less.” This means recruiters will be tasked with less sourcing and screening, but more interviewing candidates, closing job offers and improving the quality of hire. While traditional research might be replaced by some elements of AI, recruiters can still flex their sourcing and research muscles with hard to find positions and by figuring out a customized approach to that perfect candidate a bot helped find.

    Artificial intelligence is also speeding up the recruiting process which reduces the time it takes to hire a candidate. This increases the chances of hiring the best talent before they get swept up by a competitor.

    Companies using AI recruiting software have seen their employee performance and quality of hire increase by 20% and their turnover decrease by 35%.

    Although a recruiter’s role will change in the future, industry leaders predict using AI to recruit is augmented intelligence. This merely means artificial intelligence will never fully replace a recruiter’s role, it will just enhance their part in the hiring process and increase the chances of a quality hire. A recent statistic foreshadows by 2020, 85% of customer interactions will be managed without a human.

    Harnessing AI for hiring could lead to more dynamic and diverse workplaces. With AI there is more focus on the candidate’s qualifications and in many cases, AI can help bolster inclusion, by allowing a broader talent pool than more subjective humans. A common caveat, of course, is that AI is only as good as those programming it, so when creating these tools, human resources, recruiting and talent acquisition must be extra careful during implementation and use.

    AI can also help improve the candidate experience during the application phase. Artificial Intelligence engages candidates throughout the recruitment process, matches candidates to alternative positions and provides support before, during and after the recruiting process. New tools are surfacing to take transactional tasks from recruiters, freeing them to focus on interviewing and closing job offers.

    This kind of technology is continuously evolving but recruiter jobs will never fully be replaced by AI. It will only enhance the recruitment process to allow recruiters to focus on hiring the perfect candidate with a little help.

    About the author: Noel Webb is co-founder and CEO of Karen.ai (Your Cognitive Recruiting Assistant), the latest project from his role as Director of Product Innovation at Innosphere. A veteran of business development and out-of-the-box thinking, Noel has been a leader in his roles over the years for several companies, including Bam Digital, SpeakFeel and Agnition.

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    Related *

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    .

    Top recruiter 10 Unconventional Yet Effective Tips For Job Seekers
    10 Unconventional Yet Effective Tips For Job Seekers

    In the market for a new job? You’ve probably been given standard tips for job seekers like “pursue your passions, ” “leverage your network, ” “tailor and tidy up your resume, ” “do your homework, ” and “dress for success”—among other things.

    Here are 10 unconventional (but very effective) tips for job seekers: *
    1. Don’t apply for a job as soon as you find it. The worst part about job hunting is the dreaded scrolling of an online job board, applying for job after job, and never hearing back, Adney says. “When you find a job online that you’re really interested in, applying is the last thing you should do. Instead, research that company and the professionals who work there, and reach out to someone at the company before you apply for the job, letting them know you admire what they do and would love their advice.” Then, ask questions via e-mail or phone about what they like and find challenging at their job, and ask if they have any tips for you. “Most likely they will personally tell you about the job opening (you should not mention it) and then you can ask them about getting your application and resume into the right hands, ” she says. “It is a great way to keep your applications from getting lost in the black hole of the Internet.”
    2. Don’t focus on finding a job you love now. Don’t obsess about how much you’ll enjoy a particular job on day one, Newport says. Most entry-level positions are not glamorous. “The right question to ask when assessing an opportunity is what the job would look like in five years, assuming that you spent those years focusing like a laser on developing valuable skills. That’s the job you’re interviewing for.”
    3. Create your position. Don’t just sit around waiting for your “dream job” to open. Study the industry or field that you’re looking to move into, and determine a company or two that you’d like to work for, Hockett says. “Then figure out their challenges through relationships or public information. With this, you can craft a solution for them that you can share directly or publically through a blog, for instance. The concept here is to get noticed through offering a solution to help them with no expectation of anything in return.”
    4. Be vulnerable. It’s okay to ask people for advice! “Too often we think we have to sell ourselves as this know-it-all hot-shot to get a job, but I have found the best way to build relationships with people whom you’d like to work with (or for) is to start by being vulnerable, sharing your admiration for their work, and asking for advice, ” Adney says. “I recommend doing this with professionals at companies you’d love to work for, long before they have a job opening you apply for.”
    5. Don’t always follow your passion. “Follow your passion” is one of the most common pieces of career wisdom, says Cal Newport, author of So Good They Can’t Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love. “It’s also wrong.” If you study people who end up loving their work, most of them did not follow a pre-existing passion, he says. “Instead, their passion for the work developed over time as they got better at what they did and took more control over their career.”
    6. Start at the top and move down. We learned from Chris Gardner (played by Will Smith) in The Pursuit of Happyness (the biographical film based on Gardner’s life) that you need to start from the top and move down. “Why approach human resources in hopes that your resume makes it to the hiring authority?” Parnell says. “Just get it there yourself. Be careful to use tact, respect, and clarity during the process, but nevertheless, go straight to the decision-maker.”
    7. Learn how to listen. Job seekers are so caught up in conveying a certain message and image to the employer that they often fail to listen.  When you practicing for interviews, don’t just rehearse your answers to questions like, “can you tell me about yourself?” “why do you want this job?” and “what are your greatest strengths and weaknesses?” Practice listening carefully and closely without interrupting.
    8. Focus on body language. You’ve probably heard this before—but job candidates don’t take it seriously enough. “”Body language is incredibly important in job interviews, ” “Watching yours (posture, your hands, whether or not you’re relaxed, confidence) will help you exude confidence, ” “Meanwhile paying attention to the interviewer’s body language can let you gauge whether or not you’re on the right track.””
    9. Build a relationship with the administrative assistant. While you want to start at the top (see No. 5), you’ll eventually want to build strategic relationships with personnel at all levels.
    10. Become their greatest fan. Once you find a company you’d love to work for, become their biggest fan. ““Becoming a brand loyalist may lead to becoming an employee, ” Organizations ideally want employees to love their company and be enthusiastic about their job. Loyal fans are passionate as consumers, and often make great employees because of this.

    Seeking more job search advice? Please visit our website today.

     

    Ace interview Interview Tips How To Ace Your Interview And Land The Job
    Interview Tips: How To Ace Your Interview And Land The Job

    The interview is your opportunity to make an unforgettable impression on the company you want to work for and get the job you want. Here are some hints and pointers that will help you make that positive impression:

    Preparation: *

    Always be fully prepared – often it is the one thing that an otherwise very competent candidate is lacking. DO YOUR HOMEWORK! Some of you are wondering what does that mean? Some tips for that include:

    1. Drive to the location before the interview so that you know how to get there, where the parking is, etc.
    2. Know the full name and title of the individual you are to meet with.
    3. Learn as much as you can about the company.
    4. Find out as much as you can about the interviewer and what they look for in a good candidate.
    5. Know what your goals and objectives are for the future so that you can measure these against what is being offered.
    6. Prepare questions that are specific to that position and that company.
    7. Always be professionally dressed. Even in business casual environments, a business suit is required for the interview process.
    8. Arrive on time.
    9. Bring hard copies of your resume. Often the interviewer will have printed it for themselves but it is always good practice to have it on hand just in case.
    • Bring a pen and a note pad in case you want to or need to make any notes.
    The Interview: *
    1. Remember this is your opportunity to shine. When greeting the interviewer make eye contact, extend a firm handshake and address your interviewer by last name.
    2. The interview is your chance to bring forth your strengths and to point out areas of your expertise that are applicable to this position. If you think you might forget some of these at the time, because of nerves, then be sure to list them on your note pad and, with your interviewer’s permission, refer to them.
    3. It would be best if you could remember them in case you do not get the opportunity to refer to your notes. Practice your answers; it will help in your memory.
    4. If you are interested in the opportunity, indicate that to the prospective employer.
    Do’s and Don’ts: *
    1. Be on time or a few minutes ahead of the scheduled time.
    2. If an application is necessary; fill it out in its entirety. Nothing is more annoying to an interviewer than looking at a blank application if it is part of their process. This, ladies and gentlemen, applies equally to interviews with companies and recruitment firms.
    3. Remember to smile and present yourself in an energetic and professional manner always.
    4. Never speak negatively about past employers or peers.
    5. Always maintain eye contact.
    6. Ask questions that are pertinent to the position and company.
    7. Point out areas that are a match between your skills and the requirements of the position.
    8. Be prepared to discuss ways in which you have excelled or situations where you have demonstrated your initiative and ability to be proactive.
    9. Be enthusiastic and positive.
    • Bring an original copy of your resume. *
    • Always answer with a complete sentence. No “yes” or “no” answers. *
    • Never smoke or chew gum in an interview. *
    Questions: *
    Arrive prepared to answer questions about: *
    1. Your strengths and weaknesses.
    2. Why you are interested in that company.
    3. What you know about the company.
    4. Why they should hire you.
    Arrive prepared to ask questions, such as: *
    1. What would be my day to day responsibilities?
    2. What is the career path from this position?
    3. What is the company policy on promoting from within?
    4. How do I fit this role?
    Do not ask questions like: *
    1. How much vacation do you offer?
    2. Never initiate the salary question. Let your interviewer bring it up at the appropriate time.
    3. How many sick days are offered?

    Questions such as these only leave the impression that you are only interested in how this role and company will serve your needs rather than a give and take of rights, expectations and responsibilities.

    When Interviewing with a Recruiting Firm: *

    This step in the process is often underestimated and mistreated. In the current market, more than 70% of available opportunities are handled by recruitment firms.

    This includes permanent, contract, temporary and project. Please remember when you have a meeting with a recruiter whatever side of your personality you choose to display is the side your recruiter will tell their client about.

    If you mistreat your recruiter by being late, not completing their internal forms, being surly and uncooperative in the interview with them or in the time you spend in their reception area they WILL NOT REFER YOUR RESUME to their client.

    This is not because they want to be mean to you but because you are their reputation. Give this some thought…recruiters do not manufacture anything. Their product is their customer service and YOU.

    If you, the candidate, mistreat the recruiter they can only assume you will also mistreat their client. They have worked long and hard to get that client and they will not risk sending someone in who will potentially damage that relationship. Make sure to keep in mind these interview tips so you can get the job you’ve been eyeing for.

    Recruitment Agency Advertising sq 1 What Most Companies Get Wrong About Employer Branding Roi
    What Most Companies Get Wrong About Employer Branding Roi

    Employer branding is top of mind for most forward thinking talent acquisition and HR teams these days.  There is a plethora of articles and resources around how to build your brand, the importance of employee generated content, etc.

    However, there are scant resources that share how to measure the dollars and cents impact of your employer branding activities.  And, this is one of the key areas the rest of the organization will expect you to have a grasp on when it comes to evaluating the effectiveness of your efforts.  In many ways, it’s the key to gaining more resources to pursue the initiatives you want to explore.

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    High level employer branding ROI *

    I want to point something out.  There are LOTS of articles about employer branding’s value.  And, I agree with most of them.  For example, LinkedIn’s research shows organizations with strong employer brands see 50% lower cost/hire and retention that is nearly a third higher. This makes a lot of sense – better employer brands help you attract and convert more of the right people.  However, this isn’t a stat you can quote your boss at the end of the year when they ask how the new culture video performed.

    You may be thinking these stats shouldn’t be too hard to translate to dollars and cents for your organization, right?  If I spend $1,000,000 on talent acquisition each year, then I can save $500k/yr by having a “great employer brand.”

    Not really.  We all know that most initiatives are more complicated than “let’s make the employer brand better.”  More likely, you’re going to say something like “let’s build a talent community” or “let’s update our careers site.”

    There are many other high level value statements that get made about employer branding and how it affects time to fill, quality of hire, etc.  These are all great, and I agree with most of them.  But, I think where most HR leaders fall down is when they can’t say “we did X and it led to Z.”

    Think about how great it’d feel to go into your CFO’s office next year and say “we rebuilt the career site for $15k and it led to a cost savings of $43,000.”

    Translating value into dollars *

    The above statements are all about value, which is close to what goes into the P&L, but not quite there.  Let’s walk through two examples to show how we can actually get to the dollars and cents ROI from employer branding activities.

    A talent community

    Let’s say we built out a talent community in order to decrease time to fill for sales jobs at our company.  Time to fill is now 50 days.  Let’s say after a year of using our talent community, time to fill has dropped to 40 days.  Pretty awesome!  Ok, so how does that translate into value for the business?

    Let’s say our sales person gets paid $100k/yr, with an annual quota of $500k.  We’ll make a few simplifying assumptions for the business nerds out there, like revenue = gross profit, no ramp time, etc.

    Ok, so the sales person brings in $500k – $100k = $400k of value per year.  If they work 250 days, that’s $1,600/day.  So, if we get them in the door 10 days faster, we just brought our business $1,600 * 10 = $16k of value per sales rep hired.  Not bad!

    There are of course other ways to get to value of a talent community.  Namely, it can capture candidates that otherwise would have disappeared.

    Another example, career pages *

    Another employer branding/recruitment marketing tactic that many organizations consider is an overhaul of their careers site.  The main metric to track here is conversion rate of visitor to applicant.

    Let’s say we are at 5% currently.  This is pretty average.  1,000 visitors gets us 50 applicants.  Let’s say we redo the site with a better UI/UX, more content, and microsites.  Now our conversion rate is 15%.  Ok, so now we get 150 applicants instead of 50 for every 1,000 visitors.  That’s an extra 100 applicants!

    Ok, so what is 100 applicants worth?  Well, we have to look at our hiring funnel.  If you interview 10% of the people who apply, that means you need 10 applicants for every interviewee.  And, if you hire 10% of people who interview, that means you need 10 interviews for every hire.  So, 100 applicants gets to 10 interviewees and 1 hire.

    How much is a hire worth to you?  Well, you know that from your cost/hire.  Let’s assume it’s $5k.

    Ok, so we just enhanced the careers site so that we now get 100 more applicants for every 1,000 visitors.  And, we know that 100 applicants is worth $5k (a new hire) to us.  If we have 3k visitors/mo, then we have 3 * $5k = $15k in incremental value per month.

    Yup, I’m a business geek *

    As you can tell, I’m a business geek and love thinking through the ROI scenarios for any and all problems.  But, beyond the intellectual interest, I actually think that these sorts of calculations are so important in understanding whether or not the business decisions you’re making are making an impact or not.

    Feel free to leave your initiative in the comments and I’ll do my best to use my MBA skills to dive into how I’d think about the ROI calculation.

    About the author:  Phil Strazzulla is the founder of NextWave Hire, an employer branding software solution that uses employee stories to enhance career sites, build talent communities, and spread the word on social.  Phil has his MBA from Harvard Business School and was previously a VC at Bessemer Venture Partners.

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    Related *

    Content retrieved from: https://www.completestaff.com.au/wrong-employer-branding-roi/.

    Interview prep sq 1 300x200 1 1 Brush Up On Your Interview Skills
    Brush Up On Your Interview Skills

    At Complete Staff you do not need to prepare for a job interview, you simply Register for Work and we match you to a suitable job, or you find a job on our website and apply:

    But we are a labour hire agency – usually in your job search journey you will need to prepare for, and sit, a job interview.

    It’s a competitive world out there, so it is important that job candidates put their best foot forward in any job interview situation.

    Brush up on your skills and have the all-important etiquette down to a tee before you meet potential employers face to face. Be ready to make a good first impression, because after all, first impressions count!

    Dressing for the interview *

    It’s often hard to know how to dress for an interview, particularly when many organisations don’t require staff to wear a uniform. The key is to dress to impress but make sure it’s suitable for the role. You may notice employees in an office environment wearing a range of clothing, from casual to smarter office attire; base your decision on what the most professional looking people are wearing. It is always best to dress up, rather than down.

    Your arrival *

    Being late will ruin any chances you have of securing a job so make sure you arrive early. This shows your employer that you have good time management skills, but also gives you time to acquaint yourself with the location of the interview and freshen up should you need to.

    Eye contact *

    Greet your interviewer by making eye contact, smiling and extending your arm with a firm handshake. Wait to be offered a seat and remember not to slouch. Body language is almost as important as what you actually say, so keep your attention fixed on the interviewer throughout. By paying attention and listening, you’ll be better able to respond.

    Ask questions *

    Remember that an interview is a two-way conversation. Whilst the hiring manager will ask you a series of questions to ascertain your experience, you need to make sure for yourself that the job is what you expect it to be. Come prepared with a few questions, leaving salary and benefits off the table for the moment.

    Concluding *

    Throughout your interview, be positive about your previous employment experiences, and don’t feel the need to embellish your achievements because your lies will ultimately come undone. At the conclusion of the interview, thank the interviewer for their time and address them by their name. Shake hands and confidently leave the room.

    Don’t fall into the trap of dressing inappropriately, seeming disinterested in the role or referring to a previous employer in a negative manner. Remember too that your mobile phone needs to be off! Do your research and mind your manners and you’ll be off to a great start when it comes to job interview skills.

    DID YOU KNOW WE OFFER COMPLETE JOBSEEKER TRAINING? *

    Including any of the following

    • Resume Preparation
    • Linked in Profile Creation and Maintenance
    • Application Letter for your Job
    • Interview Preparation and Mock Rehearsals
     
    Interview prep sq 1 Interview Tips You Should Never Miss
    Interview Tips You Should Never Miss

    Someone said on Twitter, these are not rocket science, but really timely interview tips of the basics.

    Do you know how to sell yourself in an interview? Have you found yourself freezing up? Have you ever had a question where you have not been able to work out what the interviewer was asking – or you could give an answer, but didn't know if it was the right one? Here are my top 10 interview tips for this month.

    1) Research the organization:

    Everyone gets nervous in interview. It's a big occasion and you should be nervous. However if you start with some thorough research, you start to build a case in your own mind of why you should be sitting in that interview room or in front of a panel. Having some confidence is a solid first step to overcoming nerves.

    You can actually tell a lot about an employer from the employment pages of their website. Things such as the values they have, how easy it is to find out about potential jobs and their responses to you when you apply, can all tell you about the way they handle their recruitment. This in turn may be a reflection of what it's like to work there. If it's friendly and easy to apply for a job, then chances are they have given some thought to why you would want to work for them.

    The web is a such wealth of facts, but what you need to do, is turn this into information. You can look at annual reports, media releases and product and service information. Online directories have company information and Google indexes the latest media news and references from other sources. If a career page has an email contact for an employee, and invites contact, then do it. Often companies will use testimonials that way to attract new people. Use sites such as linked in to research companies.

    When you look for this information, you are not just looking for a set of unrelated facts. You should be looking for reasons that you want to work for that employer. You'll really impress the interviewer if you find some simple yet compelling reasons as to why you want to work for the employer and what appeals to you about the role.

    2) Research the role:

    One thing that constantly surprises me is that how few people really have any understanding of the role that they are applying for. Job advertisements are partly to blame for this. They are often misleading. The person writing the advert is often not the person that you'll be reporting to. Things always sound different on paper compared to what you will actually be doing in the role.

    One of my clients recently applied for a job in the public sector. The position description said:

    Building effective communication strategies with a variety of stakeholders and colleagues to ensure information exchanges are timely, accurate and useful.

    This is what this statement meant:

    Providing advice to staff and students on the status of their research applications.

    If you see something like the above, try to talk to someone who knows about the role. A good question to ask is "what does a typical day/week look like?" Once you know what's expected of you, preparing for the interview is instantly easier.

    Also important is a real insight into the role and the recruitment process. Dig deeper than the advertisement. Put a call through if a contact number is provided. You can find out which of the skills that the employer requires are actually the priority. You can determine what you can do without and importantly you can start to make yourself known (in a good way) to your future employer. Even if the advertisement doesn't invite it, you can still contact the recruiter. If there are no contact details, be scrupulously polite, it usually means the employers are expecting a deluge of applications.

    Ask them questions about the recruitment process, what the steps are, how long each step takes, and whether they've had many applicants. You'd be surprised at the information you'll receive if you sound polite and interested.

    3) Research yourself:

    Employers want you to be self-aware. Have a long hard look at what you have achieved, the way you have achieved that result and the skills you developed or demonstrated along the way.

    This type of reflection helps you understand your strengths. It gives you confidence and helps you overcome nerves.

    4) Interviewer insight:

    No two interview processes are the same. Depending on the organization and the role, you could be interviewed by a recruitment consultant, the HR department, the line manager, all three individually, or any combination. Each will have a different agenda for the interview. This is important to remember as your approach with each should be slightly different.

    The recruitment consultant is always the first screener.

    Their role is to match you to the employer's requirements and sell you as an applicant. The consultant establishes their credibility with each good candidate they put forward to the employer. Take time to woo them, even if you think they don't know their stuff (as is a common criticism). Their role is essentially a sales one: to sell you the job and, if they believe you are right for the role, to sell you to their client. Make the consultant's role easier by focussing on your strengths and achievements and point out why you are a good match.

    The HR consultant is usually the recruitment procedural expert. One of their jobs is to ensure the organization meets its legal requirements. They often set up the recruitment process and have a strong attachment to ensuring it is working. It's a safe bet that you will face a more structured interview from them, than you will from a line manager. They are often the employer's first screener and may need to sell you further, depending on their position and influence within the organisation.

    The line manager will be the person who is most concerned about finding someone for the role. They may be a person down or not meeting their organisation's objectives by being understaffed. In the interview it will be the line manager who has the greatest sense of urgency about filling the role. Focus on your workplace achievements when fielding their questions. Work hard to build a rapport with them. They will be assessing your fit for their team.

    It may sound obvious but treat each interviewer as if they don't talk to each other and know anything about you. You'd be amazed at how little communication sometimes goes on between each party.

    5) Practice:

    Most organizations now use behavioural questions – which means they will be expecting you to provide specific examples of where you have demonstrated the skill they are seeking.

    I strongly suggest practicing for an interview and seeking professional help. A professional is skilled at drawing examples out of you and finessing the ones you already have. However never rote learn your lines as you can never predict all the recruiter will ask. Memorizing answers will make you stressed in the interview if you can't recall what you want to say. You may even be not be answering the questions the interviewer asks.

    6) Build rapport:

    Be friendly. People like that!

    One of the best ways to relax is to assume the interviewer is on your side. Good interviewers are not interested in tripping you up. In fact, most of them are on your side, or are at the very least they will be approaching the interview in a professional manner. It may even help to you to relax if you think of the interviewer as someone who wants you to do your best

    7) Give yourself time:

    Leave plenty of time to get to the interview. Rushing breeds panic. No matter what excuse you have, lateness is noted. It creates a negative impression and it puts you behind immediately. Allowing waiting time for an interview gives you time to compose yourself, gather your thoughts and be mentally prepared.

    8) Please be yourself:

    That is please be yourself. You will be doing yourself no favours if you try and suppress your personality, or pretend to be something that you aren't.

    9) Relax:

    While you think this may be the perfect job for you, it may be that it's not. There are other jobs out there. If you keep this in mind then you'll remove some pressure from yourself that this is your only chance to perform.

    If you think the interview is going badly, relax and use it as practice for the next one. You never know, you could even recover if you take this approach.

    10) An insider's tip is one of the best interview tips:

    The interview is just the formal means of assessing your suitability as a candidate. However you are not just assessed there. Each interaction you have with your future employer feeds into the bigger picture of their impression of you. Use this knowledge. Be polite and friendly with whomever you meet in the process from the very first phone call to the last goodbye to the receptionist on your way out.

    Interviews can be daunting. Please contact me if you need some help putting it all into practice or just some extra advice. Here's another blatant plug. Explore more job interview tips with professionals to enhance your interview skills.

    Social media 5 Ways To Help You Understand Your Social Employer Brand
    5 Ways To Help You Understand Your Social Employer Brand

    The ability to attract, as well as retain, your ideal employee is integral to your business. Attracting that individual can be very competitive and in today’s modern mobile climate, one of the best ways to compete is to create a strong social employer brand.

    1. Understand each platform *

    Each social platform has its own unique benefit to your employer brand. You should first and foremost understand what they are.

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    • Facebook is the most used social media platform in the world and is a great place to start. Potential candidates, especially millennials, will definitely be going on your Facebook page as one of their first assessments of your business to see what your follower base is like, and what photos and videos you have to show off. They will also go to your page to find out your contact information, your location and to see any reviews you have received from clients. So be sure to keep it constantly updated.
    • Twitter is more of a place for communication and engagement. For example, you could use twitter to share relevant trends, and retweet quotes from key industry influencers and stakeholders.
    • Instagram is your platform to tell stories, a topic we will delve into later on in this piece. Use Instagram to share pictures and videos about your employees, your achievements and the events you attend. It’s a behind the scenes look into your business that offers real transparency and authenticity.
    • LinkedIn is your brand’s professional social presence, and is a great place to reach out to, and identify, potential candidates.

    There are more social platforms that I might have ignored such as Pinterest, Google+ and more that are important to your business and the image you want to communicate.

    So just continue to evaluate, improve and develop your strategy on the platforms you want to use and make sure you are utilizing the distinct capabilities of each platform to the best of your abilities.

    2. Employee advocacy: Get your employees involved *

    There really is nothing more authentic than employee advocacy when it comes to promoting your social employer brand.

    Enable your employees to share information about your brand on relevant social platforms. Allow them to post, share and like industry relevant information that intrigues them.

    Potential candidates want to see what type of employee is at your company. They want to know if they match the type of person they want to work with, and what they should expect if they were to join you.

    Dell has a social media training program for over 10,000 employees, in order to help them engage their online community and post brand-related content. Along with their great company culture, employees feel happy to post about the company, as seen below.

    How Dell Helps Female Students See What They Can Be #iwork4dell https://t.co/QJ6pGujrJS #Iwork4Dell pic.twitter.com/1ZM65w7ryw

    — Jennifer J Newbill (@JenniferNAtDell) April 5, 2017

    3. Go behind the scenes *

    Use social media platforms to tell a story about your employer brand. Your candidates want to know more than what they just read. They want to see your brand and get a real feel for your business.

    At the same time, your current employees want to feel they are a part of your story and that each individual person means something to your brand.

    Be sure to be sharing photos of company events, funny videos at the office and pictures of your employees.

    Platforms like Instagram, Facebook and Twitter are great places to do exactly that. Your candidates will enjoy the transparency, in terms of the day-to-day culture currently being offered at your brand.

    4. Monitor employer review sites *

    Employer review sites have become extremely important for potential candidates to get a real understanding of a brand’s management style, benefits system, workplace culture and much more.

    These reviews are trusted among candidates and employees because of their anonymity and un-forceful nature. Leaving a review is voluntary and reviews are an authentic overview of a business’ employer brand.

    So be sure to be reviewing these sites as much as possible. Dedicated review sites like Glassdoor, Great Place to Work, and even Indeed are useful places for you to get a real understanding of how employees and former employees are communicating your employer brand.

    Does your employer brand, and the value proposition you offer, line up with what reviews are saying online? Does the work culture you think you have actually line up the work culture your employees are communicating online?

    Check out this example review on Glassdoor below about Facebook:

    This Facebook employee enjoys the staff culture but is confused by the organizational structure. So an employer brand manager can use this information to improve the clarity of Facebook’s organizational structure by reminding their employees what their responsibilities are and who they report to.

    Organizational structure is extremely important in large organizations like Facebook, and by just going on a review site like Glassdoor, you can make some very important changes to your business.

    Employer review sites are an integral place for you to continuously audit your employer brand; in terms of what you’re doing right and more importantly, what you’re doing wrong, so that you can continue to improve.

    5. Spy on competitors *

    Lastly, don’t be ashamed to evaluate what your competitors are doing. Use it to benchmark your social employer brand in concurrence with what others are doing.

    If a competitor is getting more likes or more retweets on a post, try to understand why. Why are they getting more engagement than us? How often are they posting? What type of content are they posting?

    Essentially, what are they doing right and what are you doing wrong. Create a social strategy based on this information and use it to develop your social brand.

    Competition is healthy what ever way you want to put it, and assessing your competitions social media efforts regularly is a great place to stay ahead of them.

    Let us know your tips to staying on top of your social brand, how you keep your social presence fresh enough to retain and recruit the best talent for your business.

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    Related *

    Content retrieved from:
    https://www.completestaff.com.au/your-social-employer-brand/
    .

    Employee drug testing Workplace Drug Testing
    Workplace Drug Testing
    Increases Safety *

    Drug testing makes the workplace safer and increases employee confidence, according to testcountry.org. It is always better to catch a drug or alcohol problem before an employee becomes a hazard. Knowing a drug-testing system is in place generally helps employees be more productive because they do not have to fear a drug- or alcohol-related incident jeopardizing their welfare in any way. Also, if workplace drug testing leads an employee to seek treatment, so much the better. Some employers may opt to refer
    anyone testing positive to a drug treatment program so that employee has a chance to become productive again.

    REDUCES ACCIDENTS *

    A drug-using employee is 3.6 times more likely to be involved in an accident, and five times more likely to make a worker’s compensation claim, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Impaired judgment can result in slow reaction times and misguided decisions, which may also lead to an accident.

    More than 17 million people over age 18 were illicit drug users in 2007, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, and more than 75 percent were currently employed. Thus, it is clear that drug testing is necessary to maintain a safe, drug-free workplace. Drug use can contribute to workplace accidents and cause an increase in absenteeism.

    Workers who abuse drugs pose a safety risk in the workplace. Businesses often face higher exposure to liability due to drug-related work accidents. According to the United States Department of Labor, 10 to 20 percent of U.S. workers involved in fatal on-the-job accidents tested positive for illicit drugs and alcohol. Employers
    often help employees caught abusing drugs by placing them in recovery programs at the company’s expense. This benefits the employer who can use the experienced employee (after completion of a recovery program) without having to hire and train someone new. The employee benefits from the freedom from drug addiction as well as financially, emotionally, and spiritually.

    Approximately 5 percent of companies in Ireland use some form of employee drug testing, and a recent survey indicated that another 10 percent of firms were expected to introduce testing during 2005 (Irish Independent, 28 June 2005).
    Typically, New Zealand employers only require WDT for high-risk jobs. According to New Zealand’s
    Institute of Environmental Science and Research, which performs most of the drug tests, there has been an increase from an annual figure of 3,000 tests 10 years ago to predicted 28,000 tests in 2006. In occupations such as forestry, transport, and meat and poultry processing, the tests are carried out on a company-wide basis (Dominion Post, 4 March 2006).
    A 2002 survey by the Alberta Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission found that 8 percent of the 755
    employers surveyed reported that their companies had alcohol or drug-testing programs, up from 1 percent in 1992 (Calgary Herald, 11 June 2005).

    And in the US, there has been an increase of more than 1,200 percent in WDT since 1987 when the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act was introduced, says the American Management Association. The Act requires companies receiving federal contracts or grants to provide drug-free workplaces, and encourages employers to create substance abuse policies and offer workplace training (Personnel Today, 25 January 2008 Workplace drug testing (WDT) is a relatively new phenomenon worldwide, migrating through multinationals from industrialized to developing countries. Some prescribe it as an effective way of managing substance abuse at work. But is it really? Controversy surrounds WDT. The issues range from questions of privacy to social responsibility and the role and potential responsibility of employers and private enterprise. What’s more, the discussion is beset by questions such as whether test results are truly indicative of substance abuse on the job, or if they chiefly show activities undertaken outside of the workplace.

    The first argument in favor of WDT pertains most to “safety-critical” professions in industries such as medicine, transport, and construction where impaired senses and judgment can have extreme consequences; business safety in terms of productivity and property are also serious concerns. In addition, proponents of WDT argue that employers have a “duty of care” to provide a safe working environment.

    The arguments for and against are vast. Opponents of the value of WDT argue that it can show only use rather than the impact on performance, nor can it distinguish between use and abuse. What’s more, WDT raises a range of ethical considerations, including the confidentiality of personal information and whether an employer has a right to know what employees do outside of working hours. Furthermore, WDT is not 100 percent reliable, producing occasional “false positives”.

    The impact of substance abuse at work *

    According to the 2005 Annual Report of the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime, 200 million working-age people between 15 and 64, or 5 percent of the global population, used illicit drugs at least once during 2005.

    Take a closer look, and we discover that cannabis use is most prevalent in the islands of the Pacific, followed by North America and Africa. Almost two-thirds of the amphetamine and methamphetamine users of the world reside in Asia. And two-thirds of the 14 million cocaine users worldwide live in the Americas (UNODC, 2005).

    Drug abuse costs the US economy more than US$250 billion each year, including about 500 million lost working days. The US Department of Labor, which estimates that up to 9 million workers in the US use drugs, says employees who abuse drugs and alcohol have 66 percent more absences and file more compensation claims than non-abusers. They are involved in about half of all workplace accidents and use 300 percent more health benefits than other employees. What’s more, the US National Institute of Health reports that 44 percent of abusers have sold drugs to other employees, and 18 percent have stolen from co-workers to support their habit (Personnel Today, 25 January 2006).

    Meanwhile, in the UK between 11 and 17 million working days are lost each year because of excessive drinking alone, which costs the economy as much as £1.8 billion every year, according to Alcohol Concern. A survey by the Portman Group revealed that 63 percent of employees phone in sick after getting drunk the night before, instead of coming into work (ibid).

    When tallying the money lost to a country’s economy, one must also consider the effects of increased risk of injury, depression, stress, reduced morale, increased absenteeism, and high workers’ compensation and insurance costs. For instance, alcohol and drug misuse costs businesses in Alberta, Canada more than US$400 million every year in lost productivity, says the Alberta Alcohol and Drug Addictions Commission.

    TO TEST OR NOT TO TEST? *

    These serious factors have spurred increased interest globally in WDT in recent years. This has culminated in new legislation for some countries, increases in drug testing worldwide, and a loud and clear call from employers for more explicit guidelines on how to effectively deal with the issue.

    But the debate opens up many sensitive, ethical arguments. Opponents of WDT argue that the process of drug testing amounts to an unwarranted invasion of a person’s private life and body. To counter this argument, some legislation has stipulated that WDT may only be carried out with the consent of the person to be tested. The opponents of WDT counter that “free consent” may be impossible to obtain if employees fear the consequences of refusing. And others argue that employees who refuse to take a drug test might inadvertently raise suspicions that they’ve got something to hide.

    Refusal to comply with a WDT requirement which is included in an employment agreement can be interpreted as a disciplinary offense in the United Kingdom, while other countries in Europe such as Belgium and Finland believe that fundamental rights such as the right to privacy are indivisible and therefore an individual cannot consent to waive such rights. In 2001, Finland passed a new law in order to legalize workplace drug testing.

    Despite the controversy, especially over random drug testing, laboratories carrying out tests in Ireland, the Netherlands, Norway, and the UK have reported an increase in demand. In France, Norway, and the Netherlands, only workers in “traditional” safety-sensitive positions are subjected to testing in any form. Pre-employment testing for screening purposes is illegal in the Netherlands. In France, only the occupational physician may decide to conduct drug tests, not the employer. Furthermore, in Finland, France, Belgium, Germany, and Austria, the result of the test is communicated to the occupational physician, not the employer. The occupational physician is only allowed to inform the employer of whether or not the person is fit for work. Meanwhile, employers in the UK and Sweden believe testing should be applied to all workers in all job types to ensure “business safety” (Ethical issues in workplace drug testing in Europe, Geneva, ILO 2003).

    Other global statistics include: *

    Approximately 5 percent of companies in Ireland use some form of employee drug testing, and a recent survey indicated that another 10 percent of firms were expected to introduce testing during 2005 (Irish Independent, 28 June 2005).
    Typically, New Zealand employers only require WDT for high-risk jobs. According to New Zealand’s Institute of Environmental Science and Research, which performs most of the drug tests, there has been an increase from an annual figure of 3,000 tests 10 years ago to a predicted 28,000 tests in 2006. In occupations such as forestry, transport, and meat and poultry processing, the tests are carried out on a company-wide basis (Dominion Post, 4 March 2006).
    A 2002 survey by the Alberta Alcohol and Drug Abuse Commission found that 8 percent of the 755 employers surveyed reported that their companies had alc
    And in the US, there has been an increase of more than 1,200 percent in WDT since 1987 when the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act was introduced, says the American Management Association. The Act requires companies receiving federal contracts or grants to provide drug-free workplaces, and encourages employers to create substance abuse policies and offer workplace training (Personnel Today, 25 January 2006).

    ZERO-TOLERANCE OR A CULTURE OF TOLERANCE? *

    ILO policy over the last decade has focused on a shift toward the prevention of workplace substance abuse and defines alcohol- and drug-related problems as health problems to be dealt with in the same manner as other health issues. However, some enterprise policies differ from their country’s respective national views. Although drug dependency in Canada is considered a disability and therefore should be accommodated in the workplace up to the point of undue hardship, many Canadian employers favour a zero-tolerance approach rather than being saddled with lost productivity and added rehabilitation costs (OS&H Canada, 1 October 2005).

    Some believe that introducing a company-wide WDT policy rather than targeting individuals on the basis of reasonable suspicion is a viable solution to the problem. For instance, British Airways recently introduced a new drug and alcohol testing policy covering all UK-based staff from baggage handlers to managers. The airline says the new policy is aimed at improving efficiency and safety. Under the policy, new staff can be randomly tested in the first six months, and anyone returning to work after drug or alcohol rehabilitation can also be tested (Personnel Today, 29 June 2004).

    Similarly, in the US, a National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) chapter implemented a random drug-testing program for its contractors and all their employees, ranging from owners to secretaries. Random drug testing has long been a goal for local leaders, but politically it was a difficult program to implement. According to NECA, the US construction industry rates as the top occupation in which substance abuse is a problem. With annual testing, employees knew the exact date they would be tested, which obviously discredited any of the results. However, with random testing employees only have 8 hours notice before being tested (Quad-City Times, 5 January 2006).

    An Adelaide, Australia testing lab that regularly conducts urine drug tests for doctors is calling for the compulsory drug testing of all doctors and pilots. They’ve seen test results for doctors with evidence of strong pain-killers, pethidine, morphine, and benzodiazepines, and the results have moved them to act. The Minister for Health is currently awaiting a report about the compulsory drug testing of doctors before moving ahead with a decision (Sunday Mail, 22 January 2006)

    Beware the “false positive” *

    Say the individual consents to take the drug test, be it on the basis of random drug testing or pre-employment screening. The result returns from the laboratory showing traces of the highly addictive narcotic, heroin. What happens next? Well, despite the first conclusion, experts say that it is indeed possible that the person could have eaten copious amounts of poppy seeds, rather than taken heroin – since the two substances both derive from opium poppies. For this reason, the US Federal Government has recently raised the threshold for opiates in WDT to 2,000 nanograms a milliliter, up from 300 (New York Times, 11 January 2005).

    Similarly, some say that the outcome of a drug test depends partly on the colour of one’s hair. The hair drug test is favored by some employers because it can detect drug use up to three months after use, while urine tests only go back one to three days. Yet studies have shown that dark-haired people are more likely to test positive for drugs because they have higher levels of melanin, which allows drug compounds to bind more easily to the hair (Associated Press, 31 August 2005). There is a need to validate test results and assess, through a medical professional, if positive results are indicative of substance abuse (OH&S Canada, 2005).

    Such examples indicate the potential minefield faced by employers who decide to implement a drug-testing policy. Yet it is apparent that employers in all sectors want clearer guidelines on how to effectively deal with substance abuse in the workplace. A Blake Lapthorn Linnell survey of UK employers in 2004 revealed that although most employers didn’t have drug testing policies, they also didn’t know where to start. About two-thirds of respondents said the Government should introduce legislation on drug testing, provided it maintained a balance between the employer’s right to select workers who were not illegal drug users and the employee’s right to privacy (Personnel Today, 7 September 2004).

    WDT good practice *

    If employers do decide to test, it’s important to use good practice, such as:

    Policy: There must be a written policy document, the content of which is known to all concerned. The policy should include prevention, identification, counseling, treatment, rehabilitation, and details on at what stage disciplinary action will be taken.
    Confidentiality: Must be strictly observed.
    Quality: Initial screening and confirmation methods must be based on different principles of analytical chemistry or different chromatic separations (first test immunoassay, confirmation gas chromatography). Tests should be carried out by an accredited laboratory using accepted guidelines for procedures.
    Consultation: Policy should be developed in consultation with workers and/or their representatives.
    Review: Procedures should be regularly reviewed to make continuous improvement.
    What should an employer do instead of, or in conjunction with, testing?
    Have preventive policies and programs in place guided by the ILO Code of Practice, 1996.
    ILO Code of Practice, 1996

    The ILO Code of Practice, 1996 emphasizes the preventive approach, which:

    calls for joint assessment by employers and workers and their representatives of the effects of alcohol and drug use on the workplace and their cooperation in developing a written policy for the enterprise; defines alcohol- and drug-related problems as health problems and establishes the need to deal with them, without any discrimination, like any other health problem at work; recommends that workplace drug and alcohol policies should cover all aspects of the prevention, reduction and management of alcohol- and drug-related problems and that the relevant information, education and training programs be integrated, where feasible, into broad-based human resources development, working conditions or occupational safety and health programs; and
    goes a long way towards establishing the ethical principles vital to concerted and effective action, such as the confidentiality of personal information and the authority of the employer to discipline workers for employment-related misconduct, even where it is associated with the use of alcohol and drugs.

     

    Job search tips from our recruiters 1 774x400 sq 1 1 10 Awesome Interview Tips From Actual Hiring Managers
    10 Awesome Interview Tips From Actual Hiring Managers

    When you’re aggressively searching for a job, don’t you wish you had some interview tips from the interviewer? Do you wonder what does he really wants from you – and doesn’t want? We’ve found pure, unadulterated comments, complaints and advice from actual recruiters, hiring managers, and HR professionals that they wish job seekers knew.

    Take a look at what they had to say, and pay attention. These interview tips may help you land that job! *

    Caveat: all hiring managers are different, and what works for one may not work for another. If you can learn from their LinkedIn profile about the person you’ll be meeting with, you may be able to judge which of these interview tips may work best for them.

    1) Know when to be quiet are just one of the interview tips you must bear in mind! *

    • “It’s OK to stop talking. I’ve interviewed far too many people who just don’t know when to shut up. Some people are nervous. Others are unsure. Some people don’t think for a second before they start blabbing, and they’re STILL trying to talk over the interviewer as they try steer them towards the next question.” – Reddit
    • One recruiter concurred, saying an otherwise-qualified candidate may dash their chances by being too long-winded during an interview as it may indicate he or she may not be good at picking up on conversational cues and may raise doubts ability the candidate’s ability to organize their thoughts. – US News
    • Another recruiter said that a candidate who kept silent after being asked a difficult question scored bonus points for not answering too quickly. The interviewer said that the silence indicated that the candidate was mature and confident enough to deal with the pressure appropriately. Silence may indeed be golden. – Pongo Resume

    2) Write a unique, well-prepared cover letter! *

    • “Cover letters really are important. Oh my god they are so important. Yes, you are repeating much of the same information as your resume, but it’s your chance to show me why it’s relevant to this opportunity. Selling yourself in this manner is a great skill. And so much easier to read than a list. And so much easier to dismiss you if you call the company or the job by the wrong name.” – Reddit
    • A recruiter stated that a small fraction of applicants take the time to produce a unique cover letter, allowing that candidate to stand out and worthy of consideration even when the resume may not be the best. – US News
    • Another was blunt in saying that most cover letter “stink, ” and that candidates should endeavor to create a brilliant one. When a great cover letter crosses this recruiter’s desk, it influences his or her interest in the author. – The Muse

    3) Yes, good manners count! *

    • “Don’t interrupt the question being asked, by trying to finish it off yourself as if you and I are on the same wavelength. It’s rude, downright annoying, and honestly it’s pretty cheesy thinking that you are finishing my sentences.” – Reddit
    • “Always be nice to the receptionist/anyone you come in contact with when you show up for the interview. If you’re a jerk to the person at the front desk, there’s a good chance they’ll say something to the person you’re there to see. Plus, it’s never too early to start making friends with support staff.” – Reddit

    4) Be punctual – but don’t arrive too early! *

    • One recruiter suggests that a candidate arrive no more than five or ten minutes early. Showing up too long before a scheduled appointment may make an interviewer feel rushed, creating an unfavorable impression even before they’ve set eyes on each other. – US News
    • “Don’t be late either. And if you are, ‘I couldn’t find the building’ or ‘I didn’t think it would take so long to get here’ are terrible excuses. Makes me think you have no research skills and can’t plan ahead.” – Reddit

    5) Be prepared! *

    • “For goodness sake, do a little research beforehand and have a few questions about the job and or employer lined up. At the end of an interview if I ask the candidate if they have any questions for me (which I always do) and they just sit there slack jawed, it really feels like they don’t really want the job. The interview process is your opportunity to figure out if the job is right for you, use it.” – Reddit

    6) Prove you’re unique! *

    • “The most important thing to remember in an interview is that you are competing with other applicants and want to set yourself apart from them. Everyone is qualified for the position, the entire point of the interview is to find out if you can present yourself in real life as well as you do on paper. (And to see if your personality is a good fit for the office.) Your entire job is making them remember you.” – Reddit

    7) Be honest! *

    • “Don’t lie…just don’t do it. You will be found out. It might not happen immediately but the truth will come out and what might seem like a small lie will snowball into something out of control.”– Reddit
    • Another recruiter recommended avoiding using “perfectionism” as the answer to the question, “what’s you greatest weakness?” You may come off as disingenuous and may even look like you’re avoiding the question. Not being realistic may make the interviewer think you can’t or won’t come up with a realistic assessment of areas for improvement. – US News

    8) Speak up! *

    • “It seems so basic, but it never ceases to amaze me how many people – even at senior level – don’t bother to do their homework properly about the companies and people they are being interviewed by. There really is no excuse for it in the age of the internet, and it makes us think ‘why should we employ you when you can’t even be bothered to find out how we work?'” – Career Structure
    • “For goodness sake, do a little research beforehand and have a few questions about the job and or employer lined up. At the end of an interview if I ask the candidate if they have any questions for me (which I always do) and they just sit there slack jawed, it really feels like they don’t really want the job. The interview process is your opportunity to figure out if the job is right for you, use it.” – Reddit

    9) Follow up! *

    • An interviewer stated that a thank-you note sent as a follow-up to a meeting isn’t just good manners. More than one in five hiring managers surveyed by CareerBuilder say they are less likely to hire a candidate who didn’t send a thank-you note. – Career Builder
    • “Follow up is huge, in my experience. I don’t see this enough from candidates I interview. Getting an email or a letter from someone I interviewed would make them stand out from the other people applying for the job – both because it’s rare, and because it shows they are actually interested in the position. The follow up shows you’re actually interested in the employer, and that they’re not just one of a hundred employers you’re sending resumes to.” – Reddit
    • “Even if you think an offer is in the bag, you can always improve your chances of getting the job if you send a thank-you letter.” – Fast Company

    10) But be patient! *

    • “Please don’t follow up every day. It doesn’t show that you’re more dedicated or enthusiastic. At best it will come off as annoying, at worst it will feel like you don’t respect the person’s time. You have to remember that the hiring managers/interview team are making these decisions on top of their regular responsibilities, so don’t get too discouraged if you don’t hear back right away.” – Reddit
    • “My advice? Send thank you emails after each interview and then wait. If you get another offer in the interim and are going to accept, inform the recruiter. I think every recruiter on the planet wants to give their candidates a first-class experience, but we have limited resources. If you’re too aggressive or unpolished during the interview process, companies will think, ‘Wow, this person is going to be really high maintenance if we do hire them. Pass!'” – Brazen

    Again, every interviewer is different and not all will agree with every single one of the above interview tips. But we found many hiring professionals each of whom expressed the same opinion on the above topics. Paying attention to these interview tips may help distinguish you from your competitors and help you get the job.

     

    Interview Tips 960x460 sq 1 Top 10 Tips Succeed Telephone Interviews
    Top-10-Tips-Succeed-Telephone-Interviews

    Been invited to a telephone interview? Here’s our top tops on how to ace it. *

    So you’ve applied for your dream job and been invited back for the second stage: the telephone interview. Congratulations – getting to the first stage is often the hardest part. But whether you’re a natural on phone calls or they fill you with fear, the telephone interview should not be overlooked.

    We asked career coach and ex-recruiter Michelle Baker for her top insider tips on how to succeed in the telephone interview, and maximise your chances of getting through to the next interview stage…

    What is a telephone interview?

    Telephone interviews are a way to filter out candidates who recruiters feel are unsuitable based upon the job description, personality fit and experience required. It can be carried out by HR and recruitment teams, or it might be with your potential new line-manager.

    It can be as short as 15 minutes, or take up to an hour, and it’s essentially a way for your potential new employer to ensure that your CV sticks to the facts, before they bring you in for a face to face interview.

    Image: Adobe Stock

    How do you prepare for a telephone interview? *

    First and foremost, have a snappy elevator pitch in the bank, that sums up who you are and your experience in a concise way.

    Start with your current position, and lay out your key responsibilities there. Then, summarise the key educational and professional steps you’ve taken to get there.

    Top Tip: Remember to keep it brief – three to four sentences will do. You’ve got the whole interview to go into further detail on your key achievements and skills.

    Make sure you know your CV and cover letter inside out. This is what you’ll be questioned on, after all, so make sure you’re prepared for questions about your employment and education experience. The best part of a telephone interview is that you can keep your CV in front of you, so you can refer to it if you get tongue tied.

    Top Tip: In the call, they’re going to be fact checking your CV and cover letter, so make sure you go over these and think of anecdotal evidence of your previous experience that you can share on the phone.

    It’s also important to show your enthusiasm for the job on a telephone interview. Drawing from her experience, Michelle says:

    “The one factor that influenced me above all others was that they expressed a sense of occasion; that this was important, they really wanted the job, they were enthusiastic and even if they didn’t have all the qualifications or experience, they sold themselves to me. In doing so they gave me confidence that they would do a great job of representing not only themselves, but also myself and my company.”

    How do you conduct a phone interview? *

    While the interviewer can’t see you, it’s still a good idea to dress smart. This will help you feel more professional, and you’ll carry out the phone interview more confidently. Plus, if your phone signal cuts out and you have to resort to video interview, at least you’ll look the part!

    Next up, when you answer the phone make sure you sound professional – not like you’re greeting your mates!

    “Be sure to smile too, as this naturally ensures you sound enthusiastic. You could even try standing up, as this will make you feel more assertive” says Michelle.

    When it comes to answering competency-based telephone interview questions, try to use the STAR technique, where you lay out the situation you were facing, the task you had to do, the action you took and what the result was.

    • Situation: Start by outlining the situation you were in.
    • Task: Talk about the task at hand. What was required of you?
    • Action: What did you do? What action/s did you take and why?
    • Result: Summarise the results of your actions.

    This will help you to show your experience for the position, and to formulate your answers in a clear, concise and confident manner.

    Image: Adobe Stock

    Typical Telephone Interview Questions *

    Each telephone interview is different, but according to Michelle:

    “Questions are used in a way to confirm the details on the CV were correct, gaps in the CV can be accounted for, that the experience matches the language used by the individual, the confidence matches the level of experience, and the candidate can demonstrate their work in a variety of ways.”

    Job interview questions will be varied, but you’re likely to be asked questions in line with the below, so it’s a good idea to prepare for them using the STAR technique.

    • Tell me about yourself and your experience
    • Why do you want to work in this industry?
    • Why do you want this role?
    • Why do you want to work at this company in particular?
    • What is your greatest achievement?
    • Can you share any experience of when you managed a team?
    • Tell me about a challenge you have faced and how you solved it
    • Where do you see your career heading in the next five years?
    • Why should we hire you?
    • What do you do in your personal time?

    Of course, some interviewers have been known to put some curveball questions out there, but these are more of a test of the way you cope in the face of pressure.

    Common telephone interview mistakes *

    A common mistake people make when on a telephone interview is that they start to waffle. It’s easy to do, when you can’t see the recruiter’s face it’s tricky to gauge what they’re thinking! But don’t worry about silences on the call, it’s not your job to fill them, feel comfortable to stop talking when you have made your point.

    People can make the common mistake of thinking that the interview is less formal when it takes place on the phone, but it’s important that you treat it in the exact same way that you would a face-to-face interview. Dress smart, keep it professional, and make sure you’re fully prepared.

    What should you ask your interviewer? *

    Asking questions during a telephone interview is a good idea, and shows your aptitude to the job in question. This is not the time to ask about holiday entitlement, or company bonuses; you should use this as an opportunity to find out about what the day to day entails, how big your potential team will be, and what opportunities for career progression are.

    As long as you prepare, act confident and show your enthusiasm for the role, you’ll do brilliantly. Remember to write down your feedback after the phone interview too, such as questions you weren’t prepared for, or questions you wish you’d asked, so that you can prepare better for next time.

    Top tips for keeping calm during a phone interview *

    –          Plan ahead

    –          Find a quiet place with no distractions

    –          Count to ten before the call

    –          Control your breathing

    –          Have your CV to hand

    –          Stay positive

    –         Have water at the ready

    If you’ve been invited through to the next stage, read our top tips to nailing your first face to face interview.

    Related articles *

    Dress for Success: What to wear to a job interview?

    6 questions to ask at an interview

    Tips to help you prepare for a second interview

    This content is created from https://www.https://www.completestaff.com.au//worklife/top-10-tips-succeed-telephone-interviews-10080/ with Octolooks Scrapes

    Work sa fe signgif Tips To Stay Safe At Work
    Tips To Stay Safe At Work
    Tips to stay safe at work *

    Workplace injuries are preventable. Here are a few tips to help you stay safe at work.

    1. Get some training and learn how to identify hazards, manage risks, and do the job safely before you start.
    2. Ask your supervisor to watch and check that you are doing the job the right way.
    3. Speak up and let supervisors know if you think a task is too dangerous or difficult for you.
    4. Ask questions and check with supervisors and co-workers when you aren’t sure or can’t remember how to do a job safely.
    5. Learn what to do and where to get help in an emergency.
    6. Always follow the safety rules and procedures.
    7. Always wear any personal protective equipment provided by your employer.
    8. Report all injuries (minor or major), WHS incidents, and near misses.
    9. Look out for and report hazards.
    10. Keep an eye on your co-workers, especially if they are new to the workplace, and don’t know all the WHS issues.
    11. Try to get a good night’s rest before heading into work. Feeling tired can lead to dangerous mistakes.
    12. If you have a safety concern, talk with more experienced workers such as supervisors, co-workers, or your family to get some advice.

    Cover letter resuime sq 300x300 1 10 Rules In Writing A Compelling Cover Letter
    10 Rules In Writing A Compelling Cover Letter
    Does your resume go better with a cover letter? *

    Some people say no, because nobody reads them. I agree to a point. Not all recruiters read resume cover letter. But I think many recruiters don’t because so many they see are a bit “blah blah blah.”

    That’s when the resume cover letter says nothing new or exciting, nor does it say anything about why the candidate wants the job. In a sea of such banality, one way to make your resume cover letter stand out, is just to do a good one. You can do more than that, though.

    Here are 10 rules to help you in making a compelling cover letter. *

    Rule # 1 *

    Even if the job is advertised through a recruitment consultant you can still do your research. Call them and connect with them. They will probably not give you their client’s name but they may give you an outline of the challenges of the role as they see them. Your resume cover letter becomes far more engaging if you can tell the recruiter how they’ve inspired you to want to take this opportunity further.

    Rule # 2 *

    If you know who the company is, then there is no excuse for not looking up the website, doing thorough research and reading the LinkedIn profile of their company executives. And that’s just as a start.

    The aim of this research is for you to find some compelling reasons to work for that organization and some ways that you can add value. So many people forget to say this on their cover letters.

    Rule # 3 *

    Your cover letter should clearly show you have read the job advertisement. The way you do this is to pick the key criteria in the advertisement and point out how you meet this in your letter.

    Also use keywords from the advertisement, throughout your resume cover letter. That way it has a better chance of being picked up in screening software.

    Rule # 4 *

    Try to keep your cover letter to one page and three or four paragraphs.

    The only real exception to this rule is if you are asked to respond to an “expression of interest.” An expression of interest is a mini-government selection criterion where you outline how you meet job criteria. Then your letter may run to two to three pages.

    Rule # 5 *

    Don’t be boring. Try to keep your own voice.

    Rule # 6 *

    Keep a logical format. I use “hook, ” “book, ” and “took.”

    “hook” :- specific and memorable reasons as to why you want the role
    “book” :- a coherent argument as to why you should be hired
    “took” :- what you want to happen as a result of an employer reading your letter

    Rule # 7 *

    Be personal. If you have someone’s name use it. Ideally, a cover letter should start with a title Ms, Mr or Mrs.

    The exception to this is when informality is invited. A first name is more acceptable in an informal email, perhaps if you already have had a conversation with the contact person.

    Rule # 8 *

    Type it. This sounds so basic. But I have to say this next bit because I have been asked this question.

    Yes.

    An application in writing generally means typed.

    Rule # 9 *

    Plain white paper please. Pretty pink perfumed pages or something similar are never a good idea. Your letter will be unique, but for the wrong reasons.

    Rule # 10 *

    OK I’ve crammed a few things here into one rule. A cover letter should not be:

    – a repeat of your resume
    – a standard letter that you send out to everyone
    – hard to read
    – full of spelling and grammar mistakes

    There you are! You got those rules. Make a wow impression from your recruiters and employers with your compelling resume cover letter.

    I need job 300x206 1 I Need A Job
    I Need A Job

    I need a job!

    Sick of saying it? The coming year looks positive for job seekers, with the rise of the services economy shifting away from manufacturing and providing more job opportunities for contractors and work-from-home roles making up the list of Available Jobs for 2019.

    According to the latest SEEK Job Growth Report, some of Australia’s fastest-growing jobs can be found in education, government and defense, design, and farming and conservation, offering a variety of opportunities across the country.

    Education & Training *

    The rate of population growth within Australia is higher now than it was for the Baby Boomers, putting pressure on Australia’s education system and driving demand for additional teachers across multiple disciplines. This growth, combined with an influx of parents striving to set their children up for academic success, is also impacting the tutoring industry in a positive manner.

    The education and training industry is projected to:

    • Grow 13.3 percent by 2018 – nearly doubling last year’s projection (Industry Projections to November 2019, Department of Employment)
    • Create 58,900 more jobs within five years
    • See 222,000 university undergraduate degrees completed in 2019/2020 (up 25,000), according to the Department of Education

    Hot jobs & the courses to help get you there:

    • Teacher Aides & Special Needs Teachers: The latest SEEK Job Growth Report shows the demand for these roles has grown by 112%, with the average salary also increasing slightly (8.8%) over the past year. Get prepared to provide individual support to students with a certificate III in Education Support (CHC30213) – no prerequisites required.
    • Primary School Teachers: The SEEK Report also states that the number of job advertisements for teachers in the primary school sector has increased by 96%. If you’re interested in working as a primary school teacher in Australia, you will be required to have a bachelor degree in Primary Education or a postgraduate degree in Primary Education.
    Healthcare and Medical *

    The demand for healthcare and medical workers is being boosted across the country as a result of the aging population and advanced medical treatment technologies.

    Consequently, the healthcare and medical industry will see:

    • Job numbers grow 16.3 percent by November 2019, as predicted by the NSW Government
    • Australia faces a shortfall of 109,000 nurses by 2025 (Health Workforce Australia)
    • The trend towards more specialised nursing continues, as experienced nurses approach retirement age and technology makes its mark on the sector
    Government & Defence *

    Jobs in the government and defence sector were in hot demand in 2019, with public service employment in the air force, police and corrections, and policy analysis expected to grow substantially in the New Year.

    Hot jobs & the courses to help get you there:

    • Government workers: Job ads for local government workers saw an increase of 77% over the past year across Australia, with federal government roles doubling in Victoria. Looking forward, employment for Intelligence and Policy Analysts to November 2019 is expected to also experience very strong growth (Department of Employment). These Government and Defence courses are a sample of the kinds of courses that can lead to work with the local, state, or federal government, or a role in the navy, army, or air force.
    Design & Architecture *

    The demand for design professionals sky-rocketed in 2019, with the need for architects and interior designers to increase across the country.

    In a promising outlook for both sectors:

    • The Housing Industry Association now forecasts over 183,000 new dwellings will be built in 2019
    • Federally funded programs such as Generate Design are seeing innovation and growth brought into Australia’s $33 billion creative industries, fuelling demand for services

    Hot jobs & the courses to help get you there:

    • Interior Designers: In 2019, the interior design industry experienced job growth of 62%, with the average salary of an Interior Designer sitting at $76,203. Aspiring Interior Designers have the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of interior design with a Diploma of Interior Design & Decoration (MSF50213).
    • Architects: Demand for architects has escalated over the past few years making the profession one of the most sought after in Australia. To work as an architect, key skills include strong design capabilities, an aptitude for business, engineering knowledge, and an understanding of the relevant laws.
    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) *

    ICT professionals play a vital role across almost every industry in Australia as technology becomes more integral to every facet of our lives. As an enabler of productivity and innovation in the economy, ICT is unmatched with an increased need for more specialist skills.

    • The Department of Employment is predicting strong growth in the demand for technology professions of 12.8 percent by the end of 2019 (Occupation Projections to November 2019, Department of Employment)
    • The highest growth nationwide is expected for computer network professionals, with a 20.5 percent increase projected (Industry Projections to November 2019, Department of Employment)
    Building Trades *

    It’s a great time to be in the building trades, with the construction industry expected to grow 8 percent by November 2019 (Industry Employment Projections 2019 Report, Department of Employment). Building trades jobs are in demand across the country (and not just in urban areas), while technicians and trade workers make up more than half of the industry.

    Significant demand is evidenced by:

    • The National Skills Needs List including a number of building trades: bricklayer, cabinetmaker, carpenter, joiner, drainer, electrician, fibrous plasterer, floor finisher, gasfitter, painting trades worker, roof tiler, solid plasterer and stonemason

    Building trades expected to rise by 83,500 jobs by the end of 2019 (Industry Employment Projections 2019 Report, Department of Employment)

    Recruitment Agency Advertising sq 1 Psst Here 8217 s The Secret Sauce To A Brilliant Employer Brand
    Psst? Here’s The Secret Sauce To A Brilliant Employer Brand

    Your gut tells you that your employer brand is critical to your talent attraction efforts. Your co-workers and industry leaders tell you the same thing. As do white papers, candidate surveys and unbiased research.

    If you’re still in doubt of all of that, this study from a few years back found that 69% of candidates wouldn’t take a job with a company that had a bad reputation, even if they were unemployed.

    So what makes it so important? Why is the employer brand and company reputation the No. 1 factor in many candidates’ career decisions today?

    It’s because storytelling is in our genetic code. Look throughout history and you’ll find evidence of storytelling among all ancient civilizations and cultures. It’s how we communicate. It’s something that human beings are pre-dispositioned for —even today when we have the attention span of goldfish.

    You know, maybe storytelling is actually more important today because we have the attention span of goldfish. Maybe, just maybe, we’re drawn into something real, emotional and captivating as opposed to the continual barrage of advertising and cold, impersonal attempts of companies to pull us this way or that.

    The secret sauce for a strong employer brand *

    And so that leads me to the key elements of a strong employer brand. It boils down to three core ingredients:

    1. Tell good stories
    2. Share the “why”
    3. Find an emotional pull

    Allow me to elaborate.

    Tell good stories *

    As mentioned, the human race appreciates a good story. Your company and your employees have a story to tell. Your challenge is to find it.

    For many companies, that is directly tied to your consumer or corporate brand. What does your company do at its core? What do you sell? What do your employees make, help with, create, provide, etc.? Has your company been around for 85 years, or are you a hungry startup? All of these are factors to include in your story…but then take it one step further and discuss the employee side of that story.

    Take Complete Staff for example. They produce quite a number of employee stories that tie nicely back to the company’s services and core values. Here’s an example:

    Dig around your company to pull those stories out, but before firming up the themes, see the next point below.

    Share the “why” *

    It’s great to understand what you offer, but to truly create a captivating employer brand, you have to dig deeper and find out why your employees do what they do. It’s bigger than the products you sell, and chances are, other companies offer something similar, right? So what makes you unique? Why do your people come to work every day?

    There is a huge cross-section of job seekers who are looking for meaningful, purposeful work. Ping pong tables are fun, but they don’t make your employer brand. There’s something bigger here (I hope!).

    Google is a great example of doing meaningful work. Google didn’t just create a search engine. They put the world’s information at your fingertips. And, that access to information can literally change lives.

    It’s not what you do; it’s WHY you do it that matters. Find that story; I cannot emphasize this enough. That’s the heart of your employer brand.

    Find an emotional pull *

    And, speaking of heart, the last ingredient in a great employer brand includes an emotional component. There’s an element that tugs on your heartstrings just a little bit. It’s authentic, true and ultimately creates a sense of loyalty with your audience.

    Remember the Chipotle commercials from a few years back? That’s a good example of all three of these components.

    They know what their story is as a brand, they know why they’re different and why people choose to work for them, and they translated that into a clever video that makes you feel. Let me reiterate that – It. Makes. You. Feel.

    OK, one more example. Let’s look at Thermo Fisher Scientific. Not necessarily a household name like Google or Apple, but they’re doing incredibly important work…and that’s part of the why for their employees.

    Read through some of their published employee recruitment tips, and you’ll notice a lack of clichés like “career growth” or “working alongside smart people.” What you’ll discover instead is a well-thought-out connector between what the employee does, and why.

    These folks may be scientists and researchers, but they don’t talk about test tubes and beakers. They’re improving air quality in Korea and the health of its residents. They talk about personalizing cancer and HIV treatments to save more lives. These are big initiatives and combine “why” people choose to come there with the emotional aspect of it.

    Here’s one last tip – leave your audience with something impactful at the end of your story. Psychologically, people equate how they feel to the last thing they remember, much more so than to the entire story. So, speeches, videos and stories are always better when you can end on an important or emotional point.

    Consider these employer brand examples and compare the stories you’re telling. What are you doing well? What can you improve upon?

    Thanks for reading. What other employer brand stories do you admire?

    How to resume sq 1 1 7 Tips For Writing A Killer Resume
    7 Tips For Writing A Killer Resume

    When you’re looking for a job and writing a resume to help you land that dream position, you should not just be asking “How do I write a resume?” You should be asking “How do I write a great resume?” Or, “How do I write a resume that stands out—and stands out for the right reasons?” To get an interview, and to get a job offer, you need to get the attention of a hiring manager or recruiter.

    As a hiring manager, I review thousands of resumes a month. There are certain things I look for in a resume that make me pay closer attention, and encourage me to learn more about an applicant’s experience rather than just set it aside and move on to the next one. If you’re struggling with getting a callback, you should consider incorporating some of these elements when you’re writing your resume. These seven secrets of an effective resume that I share below will help you write an effective resume and get your resume to the top of the stack every time.

    1. Keywords, Keywords, Keywords. *

    Just like location, location, location in real estate, keywords and key phrases are the base for any great resume and they are how you can create a resume that will get you noticed. This is especially important for an online resume. To use keywords to create your effective resume, start by picking job-specific keywords that are relevant to your prior work experience, achievements, and career goals. When a hiring manager or recruiter does a search in their candidate database or on a job board, the keywords they search for need to be in your resume. Personality descriptors and vague soft skills are not what a recruiter or potential employer searches by. Examples of these words that you should leave out are: effective communicator, self-motivated, amiable. Better keywords to use when writing your resume are technical skills and actual position titles like: cost accountant, contract negotiation, and profit and loss management.

    2. Tailor your resume to the position you are trying to pursue. *

    On the work history section of your resume don’t list all your duties at your previous job. This is a common resume mistake—too many job seekers create a resume that tries to impress an employer by saying “look at all the responsibilities I had!” They don’t care about the ones that won’t help them. Instead, for an effective resume, list the duties from your work experience that are MOST APPLICABLE to the position you are trying to obtain. These are your actual qualifications for the position, and this is what an employer cares about. Even better is to choose accomplishments and contributions that are related and list those as well. Which brings me to my next point.

    3. List accomplishments and contributions, not just duties. *

    Employers want to see what you can do for them, what value-added service or skill set you are going to bring to the table. When I review a resume, I want to know what you actually accomplished at your last job and how that translates into what my company needs. Pick accomplishments that are specific to the job you are trying to get. To help you write a resume that specifically addresses a company’s needs, look beyond the job description to the company’s website or LinkedIn page to learn more about their culture, goals, and mission. An effective resume is as much about the company you are trying to impress as it is about you.

    4. Market your knowledge, skills, and abilities. *

    Resume writing is marketing. I always tell my clients the first one-third of their resume is the most important. If the top third of the page catches my eye, then I will take the time to read the rest. You can make your resume stand out by creating a powerful career summary at the top and then adding a core strengths section right underneath.

    5. Create a powerful introductory summary statement. *

    Your introductory statement needs to be related to the position you want to obtain, sell your best attributes, and be POWERFUL. When I read an introductory statement I’m looking for that WOW factor. I want it to grab my attention, tell me you’re the best candidate for my position, and make me want to read the rest of your resume. Don’t make it just a resume objective statement—in case I haven’t been clear enough already, you need to address what the employer wants and needs, not just what you want from them.

    6. Highlight your strengths in a core knowledge section.

    This is a great place for keywords. Use industry-specific keywords in this section. If you put your keywords here and disperse them throughout the resume, your chances of getting through an applicant tracking system—or being first to show in a potential employer’s search on a job board—dramatically increases.

    7. Create an eye-catching resume. *

    With the tools available in even basic programs like Microsoft Word, there’s no reason for you to not have a modern resume that is visually appealing. Formatting matters and you need to design your resume layout to be reader-friendly and attention-grabbing. Pick an easy-to-read font, and use plenty of white space. Don’t try to cram everything into a one-page resume. A two-page resume is perfectly appropriate, and expected even, especially if it is an executive resume. If hiring managers open your resume and it is a crowded, jumbled mess they are not going to spend more of their time searching through it to find the information they need. A messy resume will likely be the end of my interest in hiring you. However, if your resume format, style, and layout are attractive and easy to read I will be more inclined to read through the rest of the document and learn about your work experience, achievements, and skill set.

    Are you tired of your resume being rejected by applicant tracking systems? I know how frustrating it is to submit your resume and receive no response. I hate seeing qualified people never break through the screening process. It shouldn’t be that way. That’s why our local Labour Hire Consultants offer a Resume Review Service so you can start seeing better resume response rates! Just contact us to find out more.

    Interview prep sq 1 300x200 1 The Most Off Putting Things Recruiters 038 Hiring Managers Do To Candidates
    The Most Off-Putting Things Recruiters & Hiring Managers Do To Candidates

    Ghosting, the term used to describe ending a relationship by not responding to texts or calls, has gained such popularity in recent years. Even the New York Times wrote a story on the phenomenon.

 At least the broken-hearted have good company! Jobseekers have many frustrations about the search process, but none greater than a lack of communication.

 One disheartened jobseeker on social media called ‘Megan’ says:

    “The most thoughtless thing is not hearing anything back…even after investing time and money interviewing several times with a company. It’s fine to be turned down, but just to be ghosted by a company? Tell me and let me move on.”

    The lack of communication has consequences beyond personal disappointment.

 Megan also says a hiring manager contacted her references and set up times for a call… and then ghosted her:

    “I was pretty embarrassed he wasted my references’ time like that. Very unprofessional.”

    Unprofessional, by the way, is a term that comes up a lot when jobseekers discuss recruiters; so do some others I probably shouldn’t write here.

    Ken Shapiro, Director of the Office for Student Success at Sydney College hit the nail on the head when he tweeted:

    “Keep job candidates updated on their status. Rejection is hard but WAITING is intolerable.”

    Indeed, with applications submitted electronically and more ways to communicate than at any time in history there is no excuse for keeping candidates in the dark. And yet every candidate has heard something like this:

    “Due to the volume of applications and in the interest of thoughtfully considering individuals best suited for each position, we will only contact applicants moving forward in the process.”

    That doesn’t sound very thoughtful at all! 
So, let’s get 2017 off to a good start. Even if an applicant isn’t the “one”, building a cordial relationship with two-way communication will surely benefit us all.

    Make the process simple *

    The aforementioned ghosting is exasperated by how much time and energy candidates must put in to every job to which they apply.

    “I’m applying for a part-time job, that requires an application and a resume, both containing the same information. One of us is doing this wrong, ” writes a jobseeker on Twitter.

    One candidate was asked to complete an 11-part “homework” assignment for an interview. Others complain of “extensive, exhaustive, months-long, multiple-interview search processes.” 

So take a few minutes to review. Would a five-part homework assignment suffice? For applications, do you really use every field? Find the balance between getting what you need and overwhelming candidates.

    Keep an open mind, really! *

    Everyone’s circumstances are different and complex and no one’s life fits in neat little boxes. (Another reason applications are universally disliked). One jobseeker implores recruiters to stop the “rapid elimination of candidates” just because they are currently unemployed, overqualified, too old, too young, etc. 

An HR insider say he knows recruiters who ask seemingly open-ended questions. But beware!

    “They’re deducting points for every word that doesn’t match.”

    A person who has been unemployed for a while might be just the hardest worker ever. A career changer will have a truly unique perspective. An older worker has irreplaceable experience. With an open mind, you might find genuinely great talent.

    Beware of the hoops *

    While job hunting, most candidates are working and they have the same daily life obligations we all do… plus their job search. This means every step requires the jobseeker to jump through hoops even if they never mention it. (And they won’t).

    • Want candidates to take a call during the day? No big deal, right? Wrong. If they work in a cubicle, finding a quiet and private spot can be an ordeal.
    • Want candidates to do a Skype interview during the day? If they work in an open office space, they’ll have to take time off.
    • Want the candidate to “just send over” work samples or other “homework”? Anyone with a job will stay up all night to finish.
    • Want to postpone an interview? That’s another excuse to the boss at the least and a loss of travel (tickets, hotels) money at the most.

    Jobseekers realize they will have to work hard and make some sacrifices. They just want recruiters can show a little humanity in the process.

 Emily Edinburg, the social media manager for Complete Staff Solutions (a talent acquisition employment agency and management services company), says companies are getting the message.

    “They are starting to realize that no feedback and long applications equal bad candidate experience.”

    If Edinburg is right, maybe the only ghost stories we’ll be talking about next year are the ones we heard on Halloween.

    Cover Letter sq 300x200 1 How To Write An Honest Cover Letter To Avoid The Wrong Job
    How To Write An Honest Cover Letter To Avoid The Wrong Job
    Your cover letter is your introduction to your entire purpose of applying for a certain job post. *

    When there’s an opening for your dream job but you’re not qualified for it yet, what should you do? A lot of people will look at the qualifications specified for the job and think of ways to embellish their actual skills and experiences to make it seem like they’re a good fit. But where’s the line between embellishment and fraud and how do you know when you’ve gone too far?

    Embellishing the qualifications on resume: *

    I know what you’re thinking: “I will work so hard and be so enthusiastic and grow into the job so quickly that they won’t even notice I’m not qualified for it.” If you do manage to fool the hiring manager and actually get your foot in the door, what’s more likely to happen is that instead of growing into the job, you’ll become overwhelmed with the daily demands that you don’t have the ability to meet.

    Instead of catapulting yourself to the top, you’ll only manage to ruin your reputation and waste everyone’s time. You could’ve spent that amount of time building your skillset and gaining the experience that would make you qualified for the dream job that has now turned into a nightmare.

    When crafting your cover letter, you should undoubtedly demonstrate your confidence and abilities. There are likely many milestones you’ve achieved throughout your career that you can be proud to display. But blatantly embellishing important skills required to fulfill a specific role is not only unprofessional, but it’s also unethical. Here’s a list of some commonly required qualifications that job-seekers lie about:

    Foreign languages: *

    If a job requires foreign language skills – as many international business companies require these days – and you don’t have those, be aware that learning a new language is not something you can easily pick up on the side while performing your job. It takes months and even years of study and dedication to reach business level fluency.

    By attempting to fake this, you’ll put yourself in a very embarrassing position when the time comes for you to actually speak Intermediate Japanese you claimed to know. Instead of lying, enroll in a class, and let them know that you’re currently studying Japanese in your cover letter.

    Also as Teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) market has boomed, many companies are looking for native speakers, usually from the UK, Canada or the US to fill their ranks. Trying to pass yourself off as a native English speaker when you aren’t just isn’t realistic.

    Technological skills: *

    The same goes for technological skills. If you aren’t tech-savvy and the job you’re looking at requires you to know how to write code when you’re barely able to operate the latest version of Microsoft Office, you’re setting yourself up for failure. Not only that but your incompetence in this area will quickly become obvious.

    Acquire the skills before applying. Take some classes and get certified. Or enroll in a class and let the employer know in your cover letter that you’re working on acquiring that skill. Maybe they’ll hire you or at least keep your resume on file for future openings.

    Managerial/leadership skills: *

    Many people embellish their job titles from previous jobs. But, there’s a huge gap between being an employee and a manager. If you’re applying for a job as a manager and have limited to no managing or leadership skills, be prepared for a lot of frustration. Managing people requires diplomacy, patience and often difficult decision-making skills. If you’re not up to the task, you won’t be able to earn the respect of your employees.

    Other lies that often show up on resumes and cover letters are education level, dates of employment, and salary. Today there are a number of services that perform professional background checks and your lies will likely be discovered. Best to tell the truth- at least then you’ll know the reason you didn’t get the job was that you weren’t qualified rather than having been caught in a lie.

    The other side of the coin is making yourself sound too desperate in your cover letter. If you’ve been out of work for a while or were recently fired, you may be vulnerable to accepting any job out there, no matter what the conditions or pay. Do you really want your workweek to include Saturdays? What about no medical insurance and unpaid vacations? Or a job that requires you to move to another state? Or a job that will start as an unpaid internship with the “possibility” of promotion to a paid position?

    Being flexible is a strength. But bending over backward for a company that doesn’t reward you adequately for your work is abuse. Display confidence in your skills in your cover letter and stick it out until the right job comes along rather than making yourself miserable in the wrong job.

    Cover letter do’s and don’ts: *
    • Do highlight skills and experiences that are relevant to the job you’re applying for. Don’t lie about skills you don’t possess or responsibilities you didn’t perform.
    • Do enroll in classes to acquire the skills required for the job and communicate that in your cover letter. Don’t say you already have a required level of skill that you don’t.
    • Do display confidence and positivity about career milestones and accomplishments. Don’t inflate job titles, salaries, or education levels.
    • Do indicate that you are flexible and interested in building a new career. Don’t settle for a job that you’re overqualified for or that doesn’t offer what you need
    Recruitment Agency Saves time and money pg Use Recruitment Agencies To Save Time And Money
    Use Recruitment Agencies To Save Time And Money
    Hiring new employees is time-consuming and expensive. These costs increase if you make a hiring mistake. Skilled and professional recruitment agencies can save you time and money in the long run. They can also increase your chances of getting the right employee on the first try.

    Save Money 300x156 Use Recruitment Agencies To Save Time And Money Savings ahead 300x157 Use Recruitment Agencies To Save Time And Money

    Here’s how:

     1. SAVE TIME IN THE HIRING PROCESS *

    It’s possible a great potential employee may never come across your job posting. The best recruitment agencies have broad networks and keep the resumes of thousands of skilled local professionals on file. Upon seeing your needs for a position, agencies provide you with a candidate who’s more apt to be the right fit than you could likely find on your own. They also save you the time of wading through a multitude of resumes from applicants who don’t fit the bill.

    In addition to seeking out your perfect employee, recruitment agencies handle the most time-consuming aspects of the hiring process, including the initial interview, skills testing, and select reference checks. That way, you don’t take valuable time away from your own duties or the daily tasks of your management staff until you’re presented with A-list candidates.

    Another plus: Staffing specialists devote their workday to finding staffing solutions, so they’re able to move a lot faster. If you go it alone, the job search can proceed only as fast as your schedule allows.

    2. DECREASE TURNOVER COSTS *

    Turnover can be expensive. In fact, a survey reports a poor-performing employee takes up about 17 percent of a manager’s time. That equals almost one wasted day per week. Factor in the time it takes to train a replacement, and you’re looking at a lot of lost hours.

    Recruitment agencies may help reduce turnover by vetting candidates before they even walk through your door. In many cases, recruiting agencies have worked with a candidate on a temporary or consultative basis before, giving staffing specialists a good idea of whether the potential employee will be able to perform to your standards and mesh with the office culture.

    3. ELIMINATE UPFRONT HIRING AND TRAINING COSTS *

    Another way recruitment agencies cut your expenses is by performing pre-employment evaluations for you. They cover a lot of the expensive legwork that can drain your budget. These expenses can really hurt a small or even midsize organization with a tight budget, limited manpower, and limited human resources support.

    This is in addition to the potential cost of a bad hire if someone doesn’t work out. Recruitment agencies also often offer their candidates access to a variety of resources and training opportunities so they can continue to hone their talents, gain updated job skills, learn field-specific regulations and stay current with technological advancements. This training ensures you get a capable employee with a wide-reaching skill set and industry specialization.

    4. REDUCE OVERTIME *

    Recruitment agencies can help you save money during busy times, such as when you need skilled temporary workers to perform an audit, file taxes, initiate an IT upgrade, or publish new marketing materials. Staffing specialists have a diverse roster of candidates who boast the skill sets you require to fill the gaps, which eliminates the cost of paying overtime to your full-time staff and avoids burning out your most valuable team members.

    The long-term benefits and savings of working with a recruitment agency can alleviate the strain on your organization in terms of time management and budget. Staffing solutions also afford you access to the cream of the candidate crop.

    I want to be a recruiter 12 Tips For New Recruiters Tackling New Business Development
    12 Tips For New Recruiters Tackling New Business Development

    Picking up the phone can be a daunting task for a newbie recruiter. Needless to say, it’d be fairly harsh of an employer to task a rookie with winning new clients before they’ve even got a feel for their new role or market, but there is something to be said for throwing them in the deep end. Everyone has to start somewhere, right?

    New recruiters should be given the warmest introduction possible, so needless to say, a great balance needs to be struck between careful coaching and letting them get a feel for things themselves. We recruited our panel of industry experts to offer their advice to new recruiters tackling new business development!

    Network, network, network. *

    Don’t be afraid to call clients and ask them questions about their sector. Have a chat with them and THEM, not you. And do more with LinkedIn Groups – share decent content and comment on others’ content to market yourself effectively. But in all cases – spend as much time on the phone and with clients and candidates as possible. Oh! And remember their birthdays!

    Be persistent, be persuasive, and never give up. *

    Once you start having lots of conversations, you start having lots of leads. Pick up the phone and have as many conversations as possible. Find a way to make every one of those conversations valuable in one way or another. If you’re talking to a candidate who’s just left a job, find out what the job is. Work to get referrals. Have conversations about what people are seeing in the market – without expecting it to turn into a job order right away. You’ll build leads, but you’ll also build relationships and learn about the field you’re recruiting in, which is the best thing you can do for long-term success.”

    Two tips – do your research on the client beforehand – look at their website, look at any past dealings your company has had with the client etc. The more information, you can draw upon in the conversation, the more credible you will sound. Secondly, don’t be too salesy. There is nothing a client hates more than a hardcore sales call. Finesse your approach.”

    Don’t cold call for the sake of hitting call volume targets *

    Conversations are so important in our industry and will help recruiters learn key market intelligence enabling them to build their desks quicker instead of having random pointless conversations because of KPI’s. Take time to ask about the client and understand their business challenges before trying to pitch services. Only with key market knowledge can recruiters create a specialism within their industry.

    Cold calling only pisses off potential clients! It can be successful, but tends to attract clients who are desperate or who will show little commitment. Before you lift the phone or send an email, think, what value can I add? What information can I give away, for free, that they will appreciate? As Jeffery Gitomer says “people do not like being sold to, but they love to buy” and thanks to Rob Malec we know “the idea is to sell more, by selling less”. If you have to cold call then you are not spending enough time marketing. Read Joe Pullizi’s ‘Epic Content Marketing’ for some epic ideas.

    In much the same way as companies are creating their employer brands, you too should be creating YOUR own brand. Why do you do what you do? What’s your passion, and where’s your niche? What is your methodology to recruiting and where is your proficiency? Use data in many of these points and tell the story of who you are as a recruiter. You’ll start to separate yourself from the pack in this way.”

    RESEARCH *

    Spend time finding out WHO you are going to call and give yourself a good REASON why you are calling them, not just “have you got any jobs”- talk about their business wins, latest awards/products/services, recent hires, similarities in your background. Above all, be genuine and friendly. Engage with the other human at the end of the phone and LISTEN to what they have to say. Maybe it wont be a win TODAY but if you handle it properly, it could be a win for tomorrow.

    Keep the focus on quality rather than quantity. *

    Make sure you have something to speak about, whether it is an upcoming seminar, a reference or company news. Do a little bit every day, track everything you do, and always ensure you follow up as needed.

    Stop selling *

    Learn to build relationships, as slowly as it needs to take. Ask lots of questions, and listen. Stop trying to be the expert, stop trying to give advice. Just listen to what your prospects have to say, need and want.

    Do lots and lots and lots of it. *

    Tackling cold calls and new business meetings can be really nerve racking for new recruiters, and the only way to get good at them is to do lots of them, analyse everything you do and say, and try to be better the next time. Watch, listen and learn from the more experienced and successful people around you. Try out their ways of doing things, and take away what works for you. But most importantly try to enjoy them, take your job seriously, never take yourself too seriously.

    Don’t look at new business development as new business development *

    Look at business development as life long relationship management and learn, learn and learn. From understanding, comes growth.

    Stop sending generic inmails *

    Recruiters need to invest in hiring and learning how to specifically tailor their approach on line to niche skill types such as developers.

    Cover ltr sq Copy 9 Tips To Writing A Graduate Cover Letter
    9 Tips To Writing A Graduate Cover Letter
    How can a graduate cover letter looks like? *

    If you are a fresh graduate, your first priority after finishing your studies is to get a full-time job. When you are looking for work, you spend a lot of time writing and polishing your resume to make it exactly right. The cover letter almost seems like an afterthought.

    It can be tempting to simply send a couple of lines to a prospective employer with the resume:

    “Please find enclosed/attached my resume for the position of [x]. Kindly contact me for an interview”

    This is not going to impress a prospective employer these days! To can be invited for a personal interview by putting a lot more thought and effort into writing your cover letter.

    Each job that you are applying for will need its own letter, and you will need to put some care into crafting your response. Taking the time to write a quality cover letter will lead to more interviews and decrease the time it will take to get a job offer:

    1. Use language that carefully mirrors the wording used in the job ad: *

    A number of employers use computer software to screen candidates for available positions. You’ll need use keyword that match the ones used in the description if you want to be matched to the opportunity. Review the ad carefully and underline the main points before you start writing your cover letter.

    If your cover letter is being reviewed by a hiring manager personally, he or she is likely going to skim over it briefly at first. You’ll increase the likelihood of getting a closer review of your qualifications if you choose language that closely matches most (if not all) the requirements listed in the ad.

    Don’t embellish your qualifications to sell yourself to an employer if you don’t fully meet the requirements the company is looking for. Do present yourself in the best possible manner, though, by covering off as many of them as you can. The employer may give more weight to some qualifications more than others, and you have no way of knowing which ones the company values most.

    2. Use an appropriate format for business letters on your cover letter: *

    Basic block style is easy to read and you won’t get confused about the proper layout. You want the reader to be able to focus on the message without being distracted by a complicated letter writing style. With this set-up, the sender and the recipient’s address are left justified. With the exception of a double space between paragraphs, the entire letter is single spaced.

    3. Stick to a font that is easy to read: *

    Now is not the time to experiment with a highly-artistic font. Even if you are applying for a job in a creative field, keep your correspondence businesslike. Select a basic font that is easy to read in a size that your reader will not have to strain to make out. You also don’t want to select one that is excessively large, since this may come across as being aggressive.

    Times New Roman and Arial are the standard font used for business correspondence. Use a 12 pitch size when composing your letter. It’s large enough to be easy to read without being overwhelming.

    4. Address your cover letter to a specific person, if possible: *

    Try to find out the name of the hiring manager. That way, you can direct your letter to him or her personally. This is a much better choice than sending your letter “To Whom it May Concern.”If you aren’t sure how to spell the person’s name, contact the company directly to confirm the spelling.

    Since some names can be used for both genders, use this opportunity to confirm whether you are directing your letter to Mr. or Ms. [Whoever] at the same time. It’s always a good idea to ask a question, rather than assuming something and being wrong. Your application may put in the rejection pile if you make a mistake like that.

    In a situation where you can’t find a name for the hiring manager or the head of the Human Resources Department, you can address your letter to “Dear Hiring Manager.” It’s still a better choice than starting off with Dear Sir/Madam.

    5. Start your cover letter by stating when and where you found the job opening: *

    The company may be trying to fill multiple position. Be specific about which job you are interested in. The hiring manager is also interested to know where you get the job postings. It helps them in their efforts to target places where quality candidates are looking to find jobs.

    6. Focus on your educational background: *

    Your diploma and degree is your area of strength as you just recently completed this. Lead with it and highlight it in the body of your letter. Tell the employer the full name of the program you have just completed, including the concentration. Don’t expect him or her to refer to your resume for this information.

    Do refer to any awards or honors you received that would make you stand out as exemplary candidate for the position. Someone who has the drive to perform well in school can transfer those skills into the workplace.

    7. Include any training or internships you have completed: *

    If you have completed any internships or on-the-job training that is relevant to the position you are applying for, be sure to mention this in your letter. However, if you think about your prior experience and it’s a stretch for you to see how it relates to the work you would be doing if you were hired for this job, the better choice is to leave it off your cover letter.

    Don’t make the reader work to have to find the connection. You want to present yourself as the clear choice for the position.

    8. List any special skills you have to offer: *

    Are you familiar with any of the specific computer programs listed in the ad? Mention them in your letter. Do you know how to set up web pages or manage a social media campaign? If these are mentioned in the advertisement or are related to the job you are looking for, do include them in your cover letter.

    Be honest about your level of expertise. Present yourself as a confident and competent person. Just don’t oversell yourself either. Do no lie about your abilities. Employers will found out. It’s the quickest way to get yourself taken out of the running for a job. You can always learn more if you have some knowledge about a subject; it’s not necessary to claim to be an expert if you aren’t at that level.

    9. Ask for an interview: *

    The purpose of writing your letter is to present yourself as the best candidate for the job and to get the employer to want to meet with you. Ask for that meeting! It’s a good idea to explain if there are any dates when you will not be available to meet due to finishing coursework or other commitments. Being honest and up front about your schedule from the outset is the best way to deal with the situation if you are not immediately available for interviews.

    10. Proof-read carefully before sending: *

    After you’re finisher with writing, go over the cover letter carefully a couple of times before you send it to a prospective employer. The little things matter when you are trying to make a good first impression. Perfectly spell the company name and address. You should also double-check the spelling of the hiring manager’s name before sending it.

    With these suggestions, you can write an effective cover letter that get you your first job after graduation. Good luck with your cover letter writing!

     

    Recruitment Stress How A Labour Hire Agency Will Take The Stress Out Of Recruitment
    How A Labour Hire Agency Will Take The Stress Out Of Recruitment

    You have just signed a contract for a large project. Your initial thought – how are you going to get experienced staff to help out on the project? Rather than heading to the employment pages, why not start with a labour hire agency that can help you with your business?

    Here are some tips on how a labour hire agency can help you complete your large project on time and on budget.

    Large numbers of staff *

    With a large project, you will need higher numbers of staff. Once you’ve committed to providing an outcome, you need to be able to deliver and with a large project that means all hands on deck. The best place to start to find the numbers in one place is a labour hire agency. They will have plenty of people on their books with the skills you need, ready to start straight away.

    Experienced staff *

    The next important factor in a big project is experienced, staff. Not only do you need many hands to make light work of the project, but it’s important to have experienced and skilled staff. Labour hire agencies examine the skill sets and qualifications of the staff, so that you don’t have to. They work with the people on their employee lists to make sure their skills and accreditations are up to date so that anyone they send to your site is job-ready.

    Save time and money searching *

    A labour hire agency can also save time for your large project. Rather than spend hours advertising for workers, you can save the advertising dollars and put the money straight into the workers for the project. A labour hire agency can help with one phone call. Let them know what you need, when, and for how long and they can gather the best staff to assist you with your project.

    Staff in the right place at the right time *

    Heading to one source for workers means you get the right staff in the right place at the right time. On-time delivery is crucial for large projects and is vital in ensuring budgets are met. Your labour hire agency can be a partner in this process and help you by doing all the screening, HR, and insurance so that you can pour your time into your project to ensure its success.

    Do you have a large project coming up? Contact us today for our most competitive rates from a Company that follows through and delivery not just great rates, but the assurance and confidence you”ll have the Right People, at the Right Time to help secure and service all your Projects large and small.

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